Education

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Students at Georgia Tech were part of a recent social experiment, but they just didn't realize it at the time. Computing Professor Ashok Goel teaches an artificial intelligence class every semester. Last semester, he did something different by adding another teacher’s assistant to his online course. Only this T.A. was A.I., operated by artificial intelligence.

Andrew Davis Tucker / University of Georgia

There is still a lot we don't know about the effects of climate change on our world.  NASA and the Air Force have collaborated to help us learn more. They've called on a special team of students from the University of Georgia for help.  The team will build two small satellites to be launched into space.  UGA student Caleb Adams details the project. 

Sarah Dorio

Chef Hugh Acheson is a mainstay in the culinary world. Acheson also hopes to change the way that kids interact with food in the classroom by bringing the traditional home economics program back into schools.

Host Celeste Headlee sits down with Acheson to talk about the home-ec curriculum he’s developed and the skills he wants to teach to young students who participate in the course

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Ashley Pointer says with her violin, she can pretty much do anything the human voice can do. 

Ironically, she says it wasn't her decision to pick up her bow. But today, as the first violinist to be accepted into the competitive Grammy Camp summer program, she is glad it happened. 

Kent D. Johnson / Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool, File

Many of the 11 Atlanta Public Schools educators who were convicted of racketeering in a cheating scandal last year can now return to the classroom. We learn more from Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Molly Bloom. 

Paula Wallace On The Spark Behind SCAD

May 11, 2016
Cindy Hill / GPB

Most twentysomethings are too bogged down in student loan repayment or first-job jitters to think about much else,  but Paula Wallace was an exception.  At age 29, she quit her job as a grade school teacher, and she started the Savannah College of Art and Design, w hich would become one of Georgia's most respected universities.

Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary

Students across the Southeast took part in an underwater robotics competition last weekend. Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary hosted the event and created a variety of challenges for the robots to complete. Each team had to build and program a remotely operated vehicle. GPB Savannah’s Gabrielle Ware was at the competition and brings us this audio postcard.

 

Dan Carsen / WBHM

Given thousands of related job openings but only hundreds of computer science college graduates, Alabama is trying to ramp up its computer science education. That includes a new policy allowing those classes to count toward core math graduation requirements. WBHM’s Dan Carsen concludes the Southern Education Desk series “Priming the Pipeline for STEM in the South” with a visit to a Birmingham-area class that’s leading the way.

Hoover High School junior Griffin Davis is all about his computer science class.

Lynn Hatter / WFSU

Florida students don’t have to take a foreign language to graduate from a public high school, but the state’s public university system does require at least two years of study in another language. Computer Coders have found a champion in Florida Senator Jeremy Ring. Ring, a former Yahoo! executive, believes coding and technology is an art, rather than a science. The Margate Democrat says why not broaden the language offerings? Instead of the usual suspects, like French or Spanish, and for those who are true romantics—Latin… why not something like Python? Or C++?

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

It looks like the Georgia Milestones test might not be tied to grade promotion this year after all.

So far, students in third, fifth and eighth grades had to perform up to grade level in core areas of study to pass onto the next grade.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psycho-educational programs." But now, another investigation into these special programs has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A string of small arsons and racist graffiti at Mercer University in Macon are distracting students at the end of the semester when they would otherwise be worried about finals.

The graffiti was both written and removed Wednesday night on doors in Sherwood Hall, a co-ed freshman dormitory.  Freshman finance and accounting major Kenny Olaganju didn’t see the graffiti before it was removed, but he heard about it.

“All that I heard is that someone went through on the first floor and wrote the N-word with a hard R on peoples’ doors,” he said

commons.wikipedia.org

The growing need for teachers in Georgia has led the Savannah-Chatham school district to rely on an often overlooked education program.  Alternative Pathways to Teaching allows anyone with a bachelor’s degree to earn a teaching certificate while serving as an interim teacher. The program has ushered in hundreds of new teachers to the Savannah school system.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah-Chatham schools let out for the summer in about six weeks. But district officials are already looking ahead to next school year. That’s when, for the first time in more than a decade, the district will run school buses instead of a private company. We looked at what that will mean for families - and bus drivers.

 

 

Grant Blankenship/GPB

 

 

All life is like this. All life is a trade off. This is just a field of gray, there's no black or white.

Michael Hayden wants college students, tomorrow’s leaders, to know just that. Hayden ran the NSA from 1999 to 2005 and the CIA from 2006 to 2009. Today he includes among his responsibilities teaching at George Mason University. Before a lecture at Mercer University in Macon, GA, Hayden shared the core of what he wants students to know.  His words follow.

twitter.com/NeumannicTimes

Being a teacher is not an easy job. Growing levels of career dissatisfaction, uncompetitive salaries, stress, low levels of teacher retention and many other factors make teaching a serious challenge. Ryan Neumann, a Cobb County teacher and host of the blog Neumannic Times, feels the weight of being a teacher and wrote a commentary based on the challenges voiced by many of his peers.

We take a listen to an excerpt of Ryan’s commentary and hear how he really feels about the his complicated career

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