Education

Courtesy of March for Science Atlanta

The National Science Foundation awarded Morehouse College a new $1.5 million grant to increase student recruitment and retention in STEM fields. According to a Pew research study, black and Latinx professionals are underrepresented in STEM careers. Black professionals make up only nine percent of the total STEM workforce.

The grant will go towards a collaborative program with more than 20 HBCUs around the country, led by Morehouse's HBCU Identity Research Center. The program will fund research into enhancing students' resiliency and identies as future scientists.

Lycurgus Muldrow, executive director of the HBCU Identity Research Center, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the impact of the grant on students across the nation.


Today on the show, we surveyed the state to discuss issues of educational policy, in addition to farming after Hurricane Michael.

GPB reporter Grant Blankenship spoke about about gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp's visions for Georgia's education system. We also spoke with farmers, comissioners, and representatives from the Georgia Farm Bureau about the devastating loss of crops in southeast and southwest Georgia due to hurricane damage.

Courtesy of Beau Cabell / The Telegraph

The Georgia gubernatorial candidates are campaigning on opposing views about the future of the education system. Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams is in favor of funding wrap-around services by ending the state's private school scholarship program. Republican candidate Brian Kemp wants to expand the program.

 

We spoke to GPB reporter Grant Blankenship about these two visions for education, along with the choices parents have between private and public schools.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, education becomes a forefront issue on the campaign trail in Georgia. What will each candidate offer and how will their proposals improve rural education without causing large tax increases? 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp hopes to give public school teachers in Georgia a raise. The Republican candidate for governor says he will give teachers a permanent $5,000 annual pay raise, a plan that would cost taxpayers around $600 million a year.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

One morning during the second week of the school year, Principal Shandrina Griffin-Stewart was about to walk the halls of Appling Middle School in Macon. She'd just stepped outside her door when she saw a class of rambunctious sixth graders. She quickly got them in line.

"Raider Pride!" she intoned.

The students responded immediately, if less than enthusiastically.

"Gear up, work hard and do right," they said in a loose unison. Griffin-Stewart tried again.

"Raider Pride!"


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, evangelical leaders and GOP politicians are continuing to voice their support for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh even as the controversy over allegations of sexual assault continue to cloud his confirmation.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, both Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams are focusing on education and school safety this week on the campaign trail. We’ll discuss the nuanced differences between each candidate’s proposals and how they plan to fund their efforts.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

As students across Georgia are making plans to head back into the classrooms, Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams released her own plan for Georgia’s education system.

At a press conference, the former Georgia House Minority Leader said fully funding the Quality Basic Education formula for schools is an important first step in serving Georgia’s students, but it’s not enough.

Sex Ed In Georgia Schools Still Abstinence-Heavy

Jul 30, 2018
Sophie Peel

No sex until marriage. That’s the message in many Georgia counties, where sex ed is abstinence based. Despite hundreds of student requests for science-based programs and several parent-led initiatives for curriculum change, abstinence-based programs still dominate Georgia schools.


DeKalb County Schools

DeKalb County is looking to fill nearly 300 teaching positions ahead of the first day of school on Aug. 6 — but recruiting teachers is also an issue beyond the Atlanta area.


Jayingram11 / Wikimedia Commons

For the last five years, Georgia State University has awarded more bachelor's degrees to African-Americans than any other nonprofit college or university in the country. Serving more than 30,000 students — GSU became the state's largest university in 2015, when it merged with Georgia Perimeter College — the university has also brought up its graduation rate by more than 20 percent since 2003. So how did GSU get to be a paragon of personalizing education for all students? 


On Second Thought For Tuesday, June 5, 2018

Jun 5, 2018
GPB

Graduation Achievement Charter High School was founded in 2012 to help at-risk students earn their diplomas. But after six years of poor performance, Georgia’s first virtual charter high school — and only “alternative”  school within the state charter system — is shutting down. The last senior class graduates later this month. To learn more about the future of virtual and alternative charter schools in Georgia, we spoke with Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Vanessa McCray.

Barney Moss / Flickr

As each school year passes, it feels as if the summer vacation months are shrinking. But for many parents, summer break is no vacation. Instead, they are met with several dilemmas, such as how they will occupy their children while they are at work, and how to find affordable, educationally enriching programs to prevent their children from forgetting what they learned all year at school.


Eric Draper / White House Archives

It’s been nearly 30 years since charter schools were proposed as an alternative to public schools. Minnesota passed the country’s first charter school law in the early 1990s. Since then, charter schools have spread across the U.S. In Georgia, there were more than 86,000 students enrolled in public charter schools for the 2017-18 school year, according to the Georgia Charter Schools Association.


  

Still from GACHS advertisement on YouTube

Graduation Achievement Charter High School was founded in 2012 to help at-risk students earn their diplomas. But after six years of poor performance, Georgia’s first virtual charter high school — and only “alternative”  school within the state charter system — is shutting down. The last senior class graduates later this month.

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona. Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explained how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

Leighton Rowell / GPB

This week we talked about student debt, modern mass protest movements and Martin Luther King Jr.'s lasting legacy. We sat down with our Breakroom guests to process it all. 

We were joined in the studio by Georgia State University professors Tanya Washington and Héctor Fernández, Soumaya Khalifa, executive director of the Islamic Speakers Bureau of Atlanta, and Leap Year founder and executive director Amber Scott. 

The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic ruling Brown v. the Board of Education more than six decades ago. Linda Brown, the namesake of that landmark court case, died March 25. She was 76. 

With Brown v. Board, it became illegal to separate public school students by race. But since the landmark ruling, many schools in the South have resegregated, according to a report from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study also found Latino student enrollment surpassed black enrollment for the first time.

We spoke about the resegregation of southern schools with Erica Frankenberg, associate professor of education at Penn State University, Belisa Urbina, executive director of Ser Familia, and Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Maureen Downey.

Tim Wilkerson

Mozart’s Magic Flute is a great first opera for children. In additional to magical instruments, it’s got a prince on a rescue mission, a funny but lonely birdcatcher, a high-strung Queen of the Night, wild animals and trials by water and fire.

We’ve all seen it: somebody shops on their work computer, or takes really long lunches, or “borrows” supplies. The workplace doesn’t always foster the most ethical behavior. But recent University of Georgia research shows it can get worse than that. Many employees lie on their timesheets, and even trash their co-workers to get ahead. We discuss with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. And Karen Rommelfanger, a professor from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

What do kids need for success in school? Good textbooks? Great teachers? Sure. But there are some intangibles, too.

School Dress Codes Ruffle Feathers

Nov 15, 2017
http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com

Atlanta Public Schools may institute a dress code to ban clothing considered distracting by school officials. At Monday night’s Board of Education meeting, two fifth-grade girls said the language of the code unfairly targets them, and not boys. They both wore leggings, which would be against the proposed rules. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Most school days You can find Jared Moore teaching freshman English at Northeast High School in Macon.


On a recent morning, students all faced each other, with their desks arranged in a room filling oval. Before they got to discussing the day’s text, Moore brought the class to attention.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

What did you do the last time your toaster broke? Or your smart phone? 

If you said you threw it out, you aren't alone. So in an age when its more the habit to toss electronics than to fix them, why would you teach high school students how to put together a circuit board? 

Well, not everything is digital. And some stuff can't be replaced.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

When students don’t come to open house, why not take open house on the road?

That’s what teachers at Hartley Elementary in Macon did the day before the first day of school this week when they piled onto a bus and toured the Hartley school zone.

Why do this? Principal Carmalita Dillard said, sure, a lot of kids missed open house, but there were other reasons.

“I want the teachers to be able to experience where our kids come from,” Dillard said.

WALB-TV

According to a recent lawsuit, hundreds of students at Worth County High School in Sylvester, Georgia were the subject of a humiliating pat-down by local sheriff's deputies. The case raises questions about privacy on school campuses.

Physics Tutor / flickr

More than six decades ago, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic Brown v. Board of Education ruling. For the first time in history, it was illegal for states to have separate public schools for black and white students. However, many public schools in the South have actually re-segregated in the years since Brown v. Board, according to a recent report from Civil Rights Project at UCLA.

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Jun 14, 2017

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

They say you can’t go home again. So maybe you should take a good long look before you leave?

That’s what seniors from Northside High School in Warner Robins did recently when they took a field trip to their old elementary and middle schools.

At Westside Elementary, students lined the halls to see the graduates. When Northside students walked in wearing their blue caps and gowns, students and teachers erupted.  At the head of the line is Alexis Monroy. This was her school.

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