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What Alan Krueger Taught Us

5 hours ago

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Princeton economics professor and former Obama adviser Alan Krueger died this past weekend at the age of 58. The cause of death was suicide. Krueger made enormous contributions to the field of economics and, more broadly, to policies that affect the lives of all Americans.

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Your Stories About Applying To College

Mar 17, 2019

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The green, serrated leaves of cannabis are something you might expect to see on a college campus — perhaps grown secretly in a dorm, or emblazoned across clothing of students who support marijuana legalization — but certainly not within a college classroom.

At the University of Connecticut (UConn), cannabis is taking center stage in the biggest lecture hall on campus.

The university is teaching a whole class focused on growing just this one kind of plant. Perhaps unsurprisingly, it's a popular class — around 300 students have signed up.

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Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode Don't Fear Math.

About Adam Spencer's TED Talk

Adam Spencer is fascinated by prime numbers. These seemingly simple numbers can be found in monster sizes—the latest being almost 25 million digits long.

About Adam Spencer

Adam Spencer originally chose to pursue a law degree and a PhD in Pure Mathematics before he shifted course to pursue radio.

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Don't Fear Math.

About Eddie Woo's TED Talk

The world is full of recurring patterns based on math. Math teacher Eddie Woo explains why human beings are naturally drawn to patterns and how we can use math to engage with our complex world.

About Eddie Woo

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Don't Fear Math.

About Masha Gershman's TED Talk

About Masha Gershman

Masha Gershman is the director of outreach at the Russian School of Mathematics, a K-12 afterschool mathematics program with a mission to instill every child with a strong foundation and appreciation for mathematics. The schools are located throughout the United States.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Don't Fear Math.

About Dan Finkel's TED Talk

Dan Finkel says math is often taught as a series of rigid steps—which can be intimidating. Instead, he wants kids to see the fun, creative side of math that leads to deep learning and discovery.

About Dan Finkel

Two afternoons a week, Mikala Tardy walks six blocks from Eastern High School to Payne Elementary School, not far from Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

She signs in at the front desk just after 3:30 p.m. and makes her way to a classroom, where she'll be tutoring second- and third-graders who are full of energy after the school day.

Today, Mikala and three students work through an exercise about communities and the building blocks that create them. They learn how to spell people and playground — two essential components of any community, they decide.

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The college admissions scandal involving parents, college counselors and athletic coaches has revived a conversation about fairness and privilege in the college application process.

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Students with disabilities and disability rights advocates are among those angry — and feeling victimized — after the arrests in the college admissions and bribery scandal Tuesday.

"Stories like this are why we continue to see backlash to disability rights laws," Rebecca Cokley, director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress, said in a statement.

College Access And Inequality

Mar 14, 2019

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The federal case announced this week charging parents with buying their kids admission to top universities is shining a light on the admissions process. Every year, U.S. colleges and universities are tasked with sorting through a mountain of applications. Some of the most selective schools, like Harvard, can get upwards of 40,000. So how do officials know if the information in all of that paperwork is truthful?

Terry Cowdrey, a former acting dean of admissions at Vanderbilt University, says the key is in consistency.

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Actress Lori Loughlin, from the TV show Full House, turned herself in to the FBI Wednesday, a day after being charged by prosecutors in a massive college admissions cheating and bribery scandal.

Loughlin along with her husband, designer Mossimo Giannulli, were among 33 parents who allegedly paid enormous sums of money to get their kids into the nation's top universities.

It's no secret that wealth brings advantages when it comes to sending your kids to college. Rich and famous parents can donate large sums of money to schools or lean on their names and connections. Some ritzy colleges explicitly prefer the children and grandchildren of alumni — at Harvard University, an investigation found last year that these "legacy" admits were over five times more likely to get in than the average Joe.

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Paying for college has taken on an entirely different meaning. We've known that wealthy parents can use their influence and their money to get their kids into better schools. But what we heard about yesterday, if true, is egregious and illegal.

Go to college, we tell students. It's a ticket out of poverty; a place to grow and expand; a gateway to a good job. Or perhaps a better job. But just going to college doesn't mean you'll finish. To unlock those benefits — you'll need a degree.

And yet for millions of Americans, that's not happening. On average, just 58 percent of students who started college in the fall of 2012 had earned any degree six years later, according to the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

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If you're a wealthy family, you certainly enjoy some advantages when you're sending your kids to college.

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Taking Care: The Cost Of Child Care In 2019

Mar 12, 2019

NPR reported over the weekend that the Trump administration’s budget would include increased spending on child care, a policy priority of Ivanka Trump.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Federal officials have charged dozens of well-heeled parents, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, in what the Justice Department says was a multimillion-dollar scheme to cheat college admissions standards. The parents allegedly paid a consultant who then fabricated academic and athletic credentials and arranged bribes to help get their children into prestigious universities.

A new father trying to provide for his family. A grandmother finishing what she started more than four decades ago. A man navigating multiple schools, hidden curriculums and financial hurdles. These are just some of the older students working toward a degree in the U.S.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Report: K-12 school funding up in states that had teacher protests

A report released Wednesday by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities says K-12 school funding is up in four states where significant teacher strikes or protests occurred in 2018.

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