Education

Ways to Connect

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Updated at 4:37p.m. EST.

The U.S. Department of Education says it is opening an investigation into Yale and Harvard universities for failing to disclose hundreds of millions of dollars in gifts and contracts from foreign donors.

The two Ivy League schools have been singled out in a federal crackdown on institutions of higher learning for allegedly not reporting foreign donations of more than $250,000, as required by law under Section 117 of the Higher Education Act.

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Contests in New Hampshire and Iowa have done little to resolve the Democratic Party's divisions between moderates and progressives.

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We have reached the point where the New Hampshire primary is a round-the-clock affair.

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Ryan Pascal, a 17-year-old student at Palos Verdes High School near Los Angeles, says when her school holds active shooter drills, it's "chaos." The first time it happened, not long after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., in 2018, rumors started flying over Snapchat and text that the school was really under attack.

"We had some students trying to stack up desks to blockade the door. We had some students sort of joking around because they weren't sure how to handle this. There are other students who are very, very afraid."

Updated at 8:10 p.m. ET

Students in Howard University's Karsh STEM Scholars Program say they tend to feel the lack of diversity in their fields most when they go on their summer internships.

"A lot of times ... we're one of something," says Adjoa Osei-Ntsansah, a junior from Laurel, Md., studying biology, chemistry and community health. One of the only women. Or one of the only black students. "Now we get to see that there's a real need for us ... so that just fuels us to want to do more and be more."

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In southeast India, rising out of green fields roamed by herds of goats, is a brand-new set of white towers connected by courtyards, balconies and breezeways. This is SRM University Andhra Pradesh.

A federal judge in Boston has handed down the stiffest penalty yet in the massive college admissions scandal. Douglas Hodge, the former CEO of the global investment giant PIMCO, has been sentenced to nine months in prison.

U.S. District Judge Nathaniel Gorton also sentenced Hodge, 61, to two years of supervised release and 500 hours of community service. He also must pay a fine of $750,000.

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We still don't have the final results of the Iowa caucuses.

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Financial firms may be discriminating against people based on where they went to college, a watchdog group says. In particular, the group found that a lender named Upstart appears to be charging higher interest rates on student loans to graduates of historically black or predominantly Hispanic colleges.

A lot more people are getting loans these days from a new breed of lenders known as fintechs, or financial technology firms. And some of these lenders factor in where loan applicants went to college.

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Public servants with student loans were furious, and the U.S. Department of Education heard them. The department revealed Thursday that it will simplify the process for borrowers to apply for an expansion of the troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) Program.

It has been more than two years since the nation's most powerful financial watchdog examined the companies that manage about $1.5 trillion of federal student loans owed by 43 million borrowers.

On Thursday, two members of the Senate Banking Committee said they're exasperated with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's continuing failure to pursue mounting problems with the way student loans are handled.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

Charles Lieber, the chair of Harvard University's Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, has been arrested and criminally charged with making "false, fictitious and fraudulent statements" to the U.S. Defense Department about his ties to a Chinese government program to recruit foreign scientists and researchers.

The final moments of Friday afternoon are slipping away at Eastern High School in Lansing, Mich., as announcements echo through the halls.

As students stream through the doors, teacher Dee Halstead is rolling her supply cart to the library. Her workday is just ramping up.

"This is my classroom on wheels," Halstead said. "It's my laptop and all of the papers I need to give the students and my flash drive so I can print off this exam."

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Nowadays, if you're a teenager who's good at video games there's a lot more to be had than just a pot of virtual gold.

There's college scholarships, tournament money and high salary jobs.

Today, more than 170 colleges and universities participate. And there's money on the table — more than $16 million in college scholarships. Naturally, high schools have followed suit.

This year, 17 states and the District of Columbia are offering formal esports teams.

In 2015, a Boston University student was assaulted in her dorm room. The perpetrator was an unescorted visitor on campus. Her door was allegedly unlocked. Now she’s suing the school for not protecting her.

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