economy

J. Cindy Hill

The U.S. Coast Guard is hosting a public hearing Thursday about a proposed rocket launching facility on Georgia's Coast.
 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Chalk it up to the law of unintended consequences.

The Federal tax reform that passed this year was intended to provide tax relief. The perhaps unintended effect was a potentially massive disruption in one of the private solutions to public sector problems often beloved by Republicans and Democrats alike.

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Macon’s Target store is closed. When Target announced it was closing a dozen stores across the country, people in Macon were disappointed to learn the Presidential Parkway store on the was on the list.

If there was an upshot, it was the going out of business sale. That’s how Robert and Mikieoel Revels loaded up with the children’s clothes they had when they left the store a few weeks before it closed with their son Noah. Though they were happy for the bargains, Robert Revels said he wasn’t happy to lose the store.

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Rajeev Dhawan, director of the Economic Forecasting Center at Georgia State University, expects moderate job growth for the rest of 2017.

Dhawan issued his forecast for the third quarter on Wednesday, August 23. He says that Georgia’s income and job growth has been affected due to domestic demand driven sectors, such as hospitality, retail and education, not showing much growth.

The U.S. economy created an estimated 209,000 jobs in July, representing a modest slowdown from the previous month but coming in better than many economists had expected. The unemployment rate ticked down to 4.3 percent from 4.4 percent.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said in its monthly report that, statistically, July showed little change from previous months, as the number of unemployed persons remained around 7 million.

Viking Economics

Jun 6, 2017
Melville House Books

In his new book, “Viking Economics,” author George Lakey examines why countries like Iceland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark have some of the happiest and most highly-paid workers and how we can apply their policies to our own economy. We spoke with George Lakey from the WNCU studios in Durham, NC.

Tariffs Could Trigger Job Losses In Northwest Georgia

May 31, 2017
Susan Ferriss / Center for Public Integrity

President Donald Trump promises to bring back factory jobs by cracking down on imported products from Mexico and China. But many worry he will trigger a trade war—and end up wiping out jobs, not creating them. As Jacqui Helbert reports with the Center for Public Integrity, Northwest Georgia could end up one of the biggest losers of all.

Beneath the “Buy American” roadside signs here, a globalist heart beats in this mostly rural corner of Northwest Georgia.

Google Images

It's been nearly 200 years since French political scientist Alexis de Tocqueville traveled 7,000 miles across a young United States. His book, "Democracy in America," described how all Americans had the potential to reach economic success, no matter what their origins. But the "American Dream" feels out of reach for many people in 2016.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Macon-Bibb County political leaders got their first look at an old school at the heart of a new housing development Tuesday.

A few members of the Macon-Bibb County Commission and Mayor Robert Reichert toured the still under renovation A.L. Miller High School building. For Commission member and Miller Alumnus Elaine Lucas, the tour brought memories and hopes for what will come once this is low income housing.

"It's going to be a boost for this whole area. A lot of our neighborhoods are in decline and this is one of them," Lucas said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Demolition formally began Monday in one of Macon’s oldest and largest public housing projects, Tindall Heights.

During a ceremony that could have looked like a groundbreaking from a distance, officials and politicians swung golden sledgehammers to break the first piece of the project’s red brick.

For longtime educator and former Bibb County School Board President,  Thelma Dillard, the day was bittersweet.

“I'm here today because I want to see the ending of my beginning,” she said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

The tick tick tick with the turn of the key only meant one thing: this moving truck wasn't starting.

Battery? Dead.

Not too long before on this sunny Wednesday afternoon, Kenny Howell Jr. had pulled up behind the apartment he, his girlfriend and their three kids shared in the Tindall Heights public housing project in Macon, ready to load up and go.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Communities in Georgia often spend public dollars on sports facilities with economic development in mind. Think a new major league baseball stadium in Cobb County. But not every sports-centric development is that large. In Macon, for example, money was poured into a new tennis complex.

Macon-Bibb County has taken the adage spend money to make money to the tennis court. About $1 million  from a 1 cent sales tax increase for special project went to renovate the county’s John Drew Tennis Center.