e. coli

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More than 100 people in six states, including 17 in Georgia, have most likely become ill from E. coli from ground beef, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

While officials have not yet identified a common supplier, distributor, brand or other source of the outbreak, the 109 people who've gotten sick all ate ground beef products in restaurants or in their homes, the CDC said.

Petr David Josek / AP

The Georgia Department of Public Health on Wednesday confirmed 17 cases of E. coli in Georgia, after a multistate outbreak was reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nearly 100 people in Ohio, Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia have become sick, but no deaths have been reported.

MORE: Georgians Sickened In Multi-State E. Coli Outbreak

Gregory Bull / AP

The Atlanta-based Centers For Disease Control and Prevention is trying to figure out the source of an E. coli outbreak that has sickened 72 people in five states, including Georgia.

Because no specific food, store or restaurant has been connected to the outbreak, the CDC has made no recommendations concerning foods or places to avoid.

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona. Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explained how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are using DNA technology to try and prevent future E. coli outbreaks.

 

The method is called genome sequencing and it could eliminate the guessing game when it comes to finding the source of E. coli outbreaks. With it, scientists can determine the exact food and location in which the contaminated produce originated.

Liz West / Flickr

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona.

 

"Do not eat or buy romaine lettuce unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona growing region," says a statement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "This includes any pre-packaged salads or salad mixes.”

 

Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explains how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.