Doug Collins

Sam Bermas-Dawes / GPB News

U.S. Rep. Doug Collins joined Georgia Public Broadcasting's Bill Nigut last week to discuss the Gainesville native’s candidacy for Senate and his close relationship with President Donald Trump.

In an increasingly sour race against Gov. Brian Kemp-appointee Sen. Kelly Loeffler, Collins said he is running as a different kind of conservative who can appeal to a wider field of potential voters.

JACQUELYN MARTIN / AP

Georgia’s secretary of state has set the qualifying period for the special U.S. Senate election featuring Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler and GOP Rep. Doug Collins. Qualifying in the race will take place next week from March 2-6, Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger’s office announced Monday.

That’s the same window that candidates in other 2020 Georgia races must officially declare to get on the ballot. The move could limit the amount of opposition that Loeffler, who was sworn in Jan. 6, will face.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Friday on Political Rewind, President Trump says he is considering naming Georgia Congressman Doug Collins permanent director of national intelligence. The move would end what is becoming a nasty campaign battle between Collins and Sen. Kelly Loeffler as they position themselves for the November special Senate election.

In an interview with Political Rewind just hours before the president’s comments, Collins signaled he would likely choose the Senate race over an administration position.


Andrew Harnik / AP

Tuesday on Political Rewind, it is a crowded field in the race for the Senate seat held now held by Gov. Brian Kemp appointee Sen. Kelly Loeffler. A feisty battle between Loeffler and Rep. Doug Collins is sparking division between GOP leaders.

Our panel discussed the latest developments in that race.


Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Friday on Political Rewind, President Donald Trump hinted that he is looking for a compromise to end the showdown between U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler and U.S. Rep. Doug Collins. The two Georgia Republicans are running for the same U.S. Senate seat.

Trump did not make it clear he will step into the contest or how he thinks he could resolve the head-to-head battle.


Precinct captain Carl Voss of Des Moines displays the Iowa Democratic Party caucus reporting app on his phone outside of the Iowa Democratic Party headquarters in Des Moines, Iowa, Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020.
AP Photo/Nati Harnik

On this edition of Political Rewind, it's our second live show of the day as we await the results of Monday night's Iowa caucuses.  At least some results are expected later in the day, but will we learn the winner?  A big question for all candidates: how much will the delay impact fundraising and their performance in New Hampshire?


Rama / Wikimedia

On Friday's Political Rewind, House Speaker David Ralston has ended speculation that the legislature could pass a bill forcing primary elections for both Georgia U.S. Senate seats this year. The proposed measure appeared to be designed to offer GOP Senate candidate Doug Collins a leg up in his battle with Sen. Kelly Loeffler.

It could have put legislators on a collision course with Gov. Brian Kemp, who favors an election that puts candidates of both parties on a special election ballot in November.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger wants to postpone any changes to a so-called "jungle primary" rule until after this November's special election, avoiding a May primary contest between appointed Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) and Congressman Doug Collins (R-Gainesville) while making other changes the chief elections official desires.

In a statement, Raffensperger agreed with earlier comments House Speaker David Ralston (R-Blue Ridge) made about eliminating the election rule that sees all candidates, regardless of party, on the same ballot.

David Goldman / AP

Thursday on Political Rewind, Rev. Raphael Warnock, the pastor of historic Ebenezer Baptist Church, announced he is a candidate for Sen. Kelly Loeffler’s U.S. Senate seat.

Georgia Democrats have urged Warnock to enter the race because they see him as a unifying candidate the party can rally around.


J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Wednesday on Political Rewind, Congressman Doug Collins has now made it official. The Gainesville-native announced earlier today he is running for the Senate seat currently occupied by Sen. Kelly Loeffler.

He downplayed expectations that a battle between him and Sen. Loeffler will create a deep rift in the Georgia Republican party. 


Rep. Doug Collins (R-9) joins Political Rewind to talk through the current issues on Capitol Hill and his work as the top Republican on the House Judiciary Committe.
GPB

Georgia Congressman Doug Collins has officially launched his campaign for U.S. Senate, opening a rift in the Republican party that adds another layer of intrigue to an already contentious 2020 election cycle in Georgia.

Speaking on “Fox and Friends” from Atlanta, the Gainesville Republican said that it was time to take his message to a bigger stage.

“Well I think what we’ve done is proven what we can do in the House and take this message to the entire state of Georgia,” he said. “Georgia is a state that is a wonderful state that’s growing and has a lot of new ideas and new people coming in – they need to see the conservative values that actually believe in people.”

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Georgia Congressman Doug Collins (R-Gainesville) is taking steps to run for the U.S. Senate seat currently occupied by Sen. Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.), setting up a contentious campaign to earn Republican votes in a wide-open contest Democrats are hoping to flip.

Collins, ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee and a staunch ally of President Trump, has been informing supporters of his decision in recent days and has no official announcement date planned yet.

He spoke on the Georgia House floor Tuesday to honor the late Rules Chairman Jay Powell (R-Camilla) who died late last year. Afterward, he said nothing to reporters about his aspirations except more information would come soon.

Jeff James / Flickr

Monday on Political Rewind, we took an in-depth look at sports betting from two of the leading advocates for a law enabling betting in Georgia; the CEOs of two of Atlanta's major sports organizations.

What are the opportunities and risks for Georgia associated with the legalization of some specific forms of sports betting?


J. Scott Applewhite / AP

On Tuesday's Political Rewind, the impeachment trial of President Trump begins and Georgia congressional delegates play key roles.

New polling from The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and CNN checks on Georgia and national opinions on a range of issues, including impeachment.


On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s a look at the biggest political stories of 2019.  A new governor put his unique stamp on Georgia, an unexpected resignation put the state front and center in the race for Senate, and two Georgia members of Congress announced their departures. 

Rep. Barry Loudermilk, R-Ga., speaks as the House of Representatives debates the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019.
House Television via AP

In Washington, members of Congress are stating their cases for and against two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump. The debate process is expected to last six hours and will prominently feature a number of representatives from Georgia.

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee listen as the panel considers the investigative findings in the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Dec. 9, 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

In a vote along party lines, the House Judiciary Committee voted to advance two articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump to the full House on Friday. Following two days of debate and lengthy televised hearings, the committee process has ended and the House is expected to take up the two articles for a vote next week.

Three representatives from Georgia sit on the influential committee: Rep. Doug Collins, R-Gainesville, Rep. Hank Johnson, D-Lithonia, and Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Marietta.


House Judiciary Committee ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., gives his opening statement during a House Judiciary Committee markup of the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington
Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Georgia members serving on the House Judiciary Committee aligned with their respective party when approaching how to make a case for or against the impeachment of President Donald Trump. 

On Wednesday, committee members began the two-day process to consider the articles of impeachment against the president.

Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, the senior-most Republican in Georgia’s congressional delegation announces he will not seek re-election. Why has Rep. Tom Graves joined the GOP exodus from Congress? 


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On Wednesday's Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp officially announced that Kelly Loeffler is his pick to replace the retiring Sen. Johnny Isakson. An Atlanta business executive, Loeffler is new to the game of politics. 

What can we expect from Loeffler as a senator and as a senatorial candidate leading up to Georgia’s 2020 elections? And, now that the announcement has been made, how will conservative Republicans react to Kemp’s choice? How will Rep. Doug Collins, President Donald Trump’s choice for the Isakson seat, respond?


Ranking Member Rep. Doug Collins accompanied by Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler speaks as Attorney General William Barr does not appear before a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

When the House Judiciary Committee takes up the impeachment inquiry into President Trump, expect Georgia Congressman Doug Collins to lead the Republican messaging.

As ranking member, the Gainesville Republican tells GPB News that he’s heading into tomorrow’s proceedings ready to push back against “what is actually going to be very much a waste of American taxpayers’ time.”


Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp is locked in a battle with President Donald Trump over his choice to replace Sen. Johnny Isakson in the U.S. Senate. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that Kemp is set to name Atlanta business executive Kelly Loeffler to the seat. Critics claim Loeffler is not a true Trump conservative and want Rep. Doug Collins for the job.

How will this fierce battle play out in the week ahead? Our panel weighs in.

John Amis / AP Photo

Gov. Brian Kemp has a big decision to make: who will be Georgia’s next U.S. Senator?  

The first-term Republican has leaned towards Kelly Loeffler, an Atlanta businesswoman who co-owns the local WNBA team and runs a bitcoin trading and storage company. But President Trump, whose Twitter endorsement helped push Kemp to a gubernatorial primary victory, has called for Rep. Doug Collins (R-Gainesville) to be selected.  

Rep. Doug Collins R-Ga., speaks on a news conference during the House Republican members conference in Baltimore, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Today on Political Rewind, As we await word on Gov. Brian Kemp’s appointment to fill Johnny Isakson’s seat in the U.S. Senate, President Trump advocates for Rep. Doug Collins. Will Kemp agree or will he go with his own choice?


Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, President Donald Trump jumps the gun and declares his choice for Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat, even before Gov. Brian Kemp announces his own preference. Will Kemp bend to the president’s will or make an independent decision? Our panel weighs in on the possible fallout from the president’s impulsive decision to back Congressman Doug Collins for the job. 

"I think the governor needs to consider that the president is looking for partisan loyalty," Spelman College's Marilyn Davis said.


Russ Bynum / AP

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump moved into a new phase last week as the House Intelligence Committee held its first open hearings.

As the witnesses were sworn-in that morning, the president’s supporters in Georgia’s Congressional delegation had already begun to voice their opposition to the inquiry.

Left, Rep. Doug Collins, ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Right, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announcing a formal impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.
Patrick Semansky/Andrew Harnik / AP

Rep. Doug Collins (R-Gainesville) is one of Georgia’s top Republicans in the House, and as such is leading the charge as one of President Donald Trump’s chief defenders during the ongoing impeachment inquiry on Capitol Hill.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

House lawmakers Hakeem Jeffries and Doug Collins couldn't be more different.

Jeffries is a Democrat and an avid hip-hop devotee, while Collins is a Republican who favors country music. Jeffries hails from a largely urban New York district, and Collins represents a largely rural pocket much farther south in Georgia.

Yet, somehow this duo found common ground this past year to pass a major policy initiative. And now one of the oldest schools in the country will award them with its Prize for Civility in Public Life.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Some of Georgia’s congressional delegates announced Tuesday their support for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

The calls for impeachment have grown after the Washington Post reported a whistleblower alleged Trump asked Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate Joe Biden and Biden's son.

Democratic presidential candidates resume their debate Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, after a break during a Democratic presidential primary debate hosted by ABC at Texas Southern University in Houston.
David J. Phillip / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, for the first time in this election cycle, the top three candidates in the Democratic presidential race appear on stage together. It was also an opportunity for lower-tier candidates to try and make some headway against poll leaders. Our panel gives their insights about how they think the debate unfolded.

 

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