Donald Trump

John Gaps III / AP

Today on Political Rewind, Republicans have called the impeachment investigation of President Trump a Democratic witch hunt. Two decades ago, Democrats attacked the impeachment of President Clinton with similar fury.


Robin Rayne / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, a battle brews in Pickens County after the school superintendent issues a rule allowing transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice, leaving some parents up in arms. Our panel weighs in on the controversy in north Georgia.

“Attitudes are changing, they are in flux," The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Jim Galloway said. "And this is something that the wall may hold for a number of years, but eventually I think there’s going to be a breach.” 


David Goldman / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Democrats praise national party leadership for choosing the state as the site for November's presidential debate. We will look at the strategies they might use to maximize their candidates’ impact in Georgia and how Republicans may respond.


John Amis / AP

Former President Jimmy Carter is weighing in on the House impeachment inquiry after learning of the Trump administration’s decision to block a U.S. diplomat from speaking with lawmakers about his alleged involvement in President Donald Trump’s request for a foreign official to investigate a domestic political opponent.

Carter said the White House was “trying to stonewall” the inquiry by blocking officials from cooperating.

Mark Humphrey / AP

Today on Political Rewind, our panel weighs in on former President Jimmy Carter's comments on the current impeachment inquiry in an interview with NBC's Andrea Mitchell. What did one of the Peach State's favorite sons have to say about President Donald Trump?


Meg Kinnard / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Speaker of the U.S. House Nancy Pelosi visits Atlanta and tells reporters Georgia will not be neglected by national Democrats in 2020 races. She also defends her decision to launch the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump after months of hesitation.

The AJC’s Jim Galloway and GBP’s Robert Jimison were among the few journalists who had the opportunity to speak with her. 


J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Today on Political Rewind, several intriguing candidates for Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat have emerged, including a prominent GOP figure's daughter and the son of a former Democratic candidate for vice president. Our panel looks at the latest developments in the Peach State's two U.S. Senate races.


Benjamin Franklin was a leading voice in the debates framing the Constitution.
Howard Chandler Christy / Architect of the Capitol

As Congress moves toward a possible formal impeachment of President Donald Trump, they should consider words spoken at the Constitutional Convention, when the Founders explained that impeachment was intended to have many important purposes, not just removing a president from office.

President Donald Trump walks off after speaking with reporters after arriving at Andrews Air Force Base, Thursday, Sept. 26, 2019, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md.
Evan Vucci / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, our panel weighs in on the events that have played out in Washington this week. What are the next moves for the whistleblower, the president and house Democrats?

President Donald Trump meets with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy at the InterContinental Barclay New York hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019, in New York.
Evan Vucci / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, it has been one of the most consequential weeks in American politics. In just a few days, House Democrats went from a wait-and-see attitude on alleged misdeeds by President Trump to a full throttle embrace of collecting the evidence for impeachment. 


GPB

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we monitor the reaction from Georgia representatives on Capitol Hill as events continue to unfold surrounding a whistleblower complaint on a call held between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy. 


Rep. Doug Collins criticizes House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats for launching a formal impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia congressmen are taking sides to either support an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump or speak out against it. So far, four Democratic representatives are backing the move.


Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET

President Trump has released a transcript of his July call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

President Trump told Ukraine's president that "a lot of people want to find out" about the activities of former Vice President Joe Biden's family in Ukraine and asked its leader to be in touch with lawyer Rudy Giuliani and Attorney General Bill Barr.

That's according to a briefing for correspondents about the contents of the July 25 phone call, on Wednesday at the Justice Department.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga. during a television news interview at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 16, 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Rep. John Lewis (D-Atlanta) and Rep. Hank Johnson (D-Lithonia) are calling for impeachment proceedings in the aftermath of President Trump’s alleged efforts to pressure the president of Ukraine to look into the business dealings of Joe Biden’s son, Hunter.


J. Scott Applewhite / AP

Some of Georgia’s congressional delegates announced Tuesday their support for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

The calls for impeachment have grown after the Washington Post reported a whistleblower alleged Trump asked Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelensky, to investigate Joe Biden and Biden's son.

Richard B. Russell Federal Building in downtown Atlanta.
U.S. District Court Northern District of Georgia

A focus of President Donald Trump’s administrative agenda, reshaping the judiciary, moves forward in Atlanta with the latest conservative jurist set to take a seat on the federal appeals court in Atlanta.

Former federal prosecutor Steven Grimberg was confirmed to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia 75 to 18 in the U.S. Senate Wednesday. Georgia Senators Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., and David Perdue, R-Ga., both voted yes.

In this photo provided by U.S.People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, Sunday, June 17, 2018.
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Trump administration issues new rules designed to further reduce the number of immigrants seeking new lives in the United States.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams’ future plans have been a secret for months ever since she passed on a run for U.S. Senate. Now, her plans are revealed. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, the shockwaves reverberating from the massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio dominate the news headlines across the country and here in Georgia.

 


 

John Locher / Associated Press

President Donald Trump is headed to both Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, Wednesday in response to the recent mass shootings in the two cities.

Along with the previous week's shooting in Gilroy, California, there were 34 people killed and dozens injured in a single week.

Rick Rojas is also in El Paso. He's the new national correspondent for the South at The New York Times. He joined On Second Thought to give us an update on the situation — and the sentiment — in the aftermath of the El Paso shooting.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, competing visions for creating a better future for Americans are being showcased in Atlanta this weekend.


Andrew Harnik / AP

Today on Political Rewind, Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger has annonced new voting machines will be put in place ahead of the 2020 Presidential Primary. Where will the machines come from and how long will it take to get poll workers trained? Is it enough time for the primary election in March?


U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., speaks as, from left, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., listen during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Monday, July 15, 2019.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Sam Olens ran two successful statewide campaigns for attorney general and chose not to confront the anti-semitic slurs directed at him from some voters, a decision he now regrets.


Joe Biden, left,  speaks during a presidential candidates forum in Des Moines, Iowa. Bernie Sanders, right,  participates in a rally in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Charlie Neibergall/Jacqueline Larma / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, members of Georgia’s congressional delegation respond to President Trump’s tweets urging Democratic congresswoman of color to go back where they came from.


Plant McDonough-Atkinson in Smyrna, Ga is a natural gas plant capable of producing in excess of 2,500 MWs, enough energy to power approximately 625,000 homes.
Georgia Power

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Public Service Commission is preparing to vote on a power plan that will determine how the state generates power and how much they will produce in the years ahead. A move away from coal is a mainstay of the plan.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, it is unclear whether the citizenship question will be added to the 2020 census after the U.S. Supreme Court sent the issue back to lower courts. The partisan implications of the question have been hotly debated, but what could be the economic impact of the decision in Georgia? 


David Goldman / AP

President Donald Trump on Saturday dismissed Jimmy Carter's swipe at the legitimacy of his election and said the charge was nothing more than a "Democrat talking point," while offering his own digs at the 94-year-old former commander in chief.

John Amis / AP Photo

Jimmy Carter is taking a swipe at the legitimacy of Donald Trump’s presidency, saying Russian interference in the 2016 election was responsible for putting Trump in the White House.

The 94-year-old former U.S. president said Friday that he believes Russia’s meddling “if fully investigated would show that Trump didn’t actually win the election in 2016.” Carter said he believes Trump “lost the election” and became president “because the Russians interfered on his behalf.”

Migrants watch clashes with U.S. border agents, seen from Tijuana, Mexico.
Ramon Espinosa / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the immigration community takes a sigh of relief after President Donald Trump temporarily delayed plans to round up millions of undocumented immigrants across the country. What is next for Georgia’s immigrant community?

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