domestic violence

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Domestic violence and sexual assault are leading causes of injuries for young women and girls over the age of 15 in Georgia, according to the state's Department of Public Health. In fact, reports indicate that 30% of Georgia women in that age group will be abused at least once by their partners in their lifetimes.

To understand why, we spoke with Michelle White, who is a child and youth project manager for the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She explained how to identify and prevent teen dating violence as well as why teens are less likely to report it. And White also described the characteristics of healthy relationships.


Georgia Power is on track to close its coal ash ponds by sometime next year, and who regulates that process could change soon.  The federal EPA wants to give that oversight to the states. The public has until Aug. 27 to weigh in on the possible transition. Grant Blankenship visits On Second Thought to discuss what it could mean for the environment.


Leighton Rowell / GPB

According to the Georgia Department of Public Health, domestic violence and sexual assault are the leading causes of injuries for young women and girls over the age of 15 in Georgia.  To understand why, we spoke with Michelle White, who is a child and youth project manager for the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence. She explained how to identify and prevent teen dating violence as well as why teens are less likely to report it. White also described the characteristics of healthy relationships. 


Today on the show, we broke down complicated ballot amendment language, explored the history of gerrymandering and discussed domestic violence issues in Georgia.

There are seven ballot measures currently up for vote during Georgia's midterm elections. We spoke with GPB's Stephen Fowler and Zac Peskowitz, assistant professor of political science at Emory University, to learn the history behind these measures and decode their complicated language.

We also spoke with Charles S. Bullock III, professor of political science at University of Georgia, about gerrymandering and drawing district lines in Georgia. Bullock said Georgia's 13th district "looked like a dead cat on the expressway" when first drawn.


Photo by U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Kelsey Tucker / U.S. Air Force

Over the past decade, Georgia has ranked among the top fifteen U.S. states for domestic violence-related deaths. During the past decade, an average of 126 Georgians were killed due to domestic violence each year, according to the Georgia Coalition Against Domestic Violence (GCADV). In 2017, that number rose, and domestic violence killed 149 Georgians. According to the Georgia Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project, 70 percent of those deaths were attributed to firearms.


In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

Shedding A Light On Dating Violence

May 6, 2016
Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Teen reporters with VOX Teen Communications in Atlanta are turning their attention to the problem of relationship violence. The United Nations reports that children who grow up in abusive households are more likely to become perpetrators or victims of domestic violence later in life. Many types of abuse aren’t physical.  One common form of psychological abuse is known as gaslighting.