dogs

On this “Two Way Street,” we’re talking about what dogs think and feel with a neuroscientist who has spent years studying them—Dr. Gregory Berns. His book, “What It’s Like to Be a Dog,” details his years of research on canine cognition.  

What if your dog could talk? Georgia Tech researchers have developed a vest that can help service dogs communicate. Melody Jackson leads the initiative, and she’s the director of Georgia Tech’s Center for BioInterface Research. We talk about canine communication with her, and with Greg Berns. He directs the Center for Neuropolicy at Emory University, and is author of the new book, “What It's Like to Be a Dog: And Other Adventures in Animal Neuroscience.”

I cover Congress, and one of the coolest secrets about my job is the furry, four-legged friend I get to bring to work everyday.

Mickey Chang is my effervescent, forever loving, black and white Shih Tzu. You may not know this, but the U.S. Capitol is the most dog-friendly workplace you will ever find. And come on — anyone who has to watch Congress all day needs a therapy dog.

Besides, Mickey loves schmoozing with senators.

Lawmakers have been bringing their dogs to the Capitol since the 1800s, according to the Senate Historian's Office.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

When Regenia Brabham opened the back door of the two story family home she’s converted into an animal shelter, out came a pit bull named Stark.

“He’s a sweetheart,” Brabham said as Stark bolted into the backyard of the shelter. “Macon-Bibb Animal Welfare found him in an abandoned building in downtown Macon.”

Stark was a bait dog. His job was to lose to stronger dogs. He bears scars from that life including the largest one earned when his handlers tried to burn him to death.

Cherokee County School District

Earlier this month, a police K-9 assigned to the Cherokee County School District died from heat exhaustion. The four-year-old dog named Inca was left inside his handler's police cruiser at the end of their shift. This isn't the first police K9 in recent years to die in Georgia from heat exhaustion. George Mathis decided to look deeper into this problem.