DNC

Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden speaks during the I Will Vote Fundraising Gala Thursday, June 6, 2019, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Four presidential candidates traveled to Atlanta Thursday seeking endorsements, raising campaign cash and hoping to reach voters. 

Cory Booker says Georgia is a blue state. Pete Buttigieg claims that Stacey Abrams was robbed of an election. Joe Biden changes his stance on federal abortion funding. Beto O'Rourke proposes a plan to automatically register more voters. 


St. Martin's Press

"On Second Thought" and "A Seat At The Table" launched a new on-air book this week. The "A Book At The Table" series began with a discussion about "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Politics" by Donna Brazile, Yolanda Caraway, Leah Daughtry and Minyon Moore. 


(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp doubles down on his muscular advocacy for gun rights and it just may be propelling him forward in the GOP governor’s race.  The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why he thinks the Parkland massacre has not deterred, but empowered gun supporters.  We’ll also discuss the risky path Democrat Stacey Abrams charts as she works to win her party’s nomination.  Plus, Sonny Perdue’s biggest battle yet as Agriculture Secretary and why Atlanta could soon be on the national political stage once again. 

Panelists:

A long-simmering fight is back on this week over the role of the infamous Donald Trump dossier after a new report that confirmed that the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton's campaign helped fund it.

The battle over the unverified dossier is a crucial front in the broader political fight over the Trump White House, the public's perceptions of the president and his stunning election win.

It has been a quarter of a century since reliably red Alabama elected a Democrat to the U.S. Senate. But Democrats see an opening in the upcoming special election to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions' old seat because of the controversial record of Republican candidate Roy Moore, which includes twice being removed from public office.

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

As Democratic pols jettison their old contributions from Harvey Weinstein, the former entertainment executive embroiled in multiple allegations of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct, his cash is not likely to leave a big hole in party coffers.

It's a fascinating thing to watch activists in both American political parties grapple with a way forward in the Trump era.

Conservatives gathered outside Washington last week at a convention, the Conservative Political Action Conference, which had been a home for libertarians in recent years. The CPAC annual presidential straw poll has been dominated by people with the last name Paul over the last decade.

Democrats may have lost the House and the Senate over the past eight years, but they always had one thing: President Barack Obama — and his veto pen — in the White House.

That won't be the case next year, when Republicans find themselves with all the power in Washington for the first time since 2006.

The capitol's new power dynamic — and the aggressive agenda Republican leaders are laying out for 2017-- is forcing Democrats to make some tough strategic choices about how they'll work as a minority party.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

House Democrats decided to stick with the leader they have. They re-elected Nancy Pelosi yesterday. But as they seek a way back toward power, Democrats did add some new members to their leadership team including our next guest Cheri Bustos of Illinois.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST: