disaster relief

Mitch Bulger / Pine Knoll Pecan Plantation

President Donald Trump has signed a $19.1 billion disaster aid bill aimed at helping communities across the country bounce back from hurricanes, floods, tornadoes and fires.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

A long-delayed $19.1 billion disaster aid bill has sailed through the House and headed to President Donald Trump for his expected signature, overcoming months of infighting, misjudgment and a feud between Trump and congressional Democrats.

Kimberly Vardeman / Wikimedia Commons

From the devastation of Hurricane Michael to trade tariffs, Georgia farmers have faced months of uncertainty. After stalled disaster and tariff aid packages, American farmers are still struggling while being shuffled around the political gameboard. 

 

Mark Peele is a cotton grower and president of the South Central Georgia Gin Company. He joined On Second Thought on the line from Berrien County to talk about the outlook — and mindset — of Georgia farmers. Jeffrey Harvey, director of the Georgia Farm Bureau's Public Policy Department, also joined the conversation from GPB's studio in Macon.

 

 

J. Scott Applewhite / AP

A conservative House Republican complaining of Washington’s free-spending ways has temporarily blocked a long-overdue $19 billion disaster aid bill.

As peak tornado season bears down on the Southeast, On Second Thought is looking at who gets aid after disasters. A recent NPR investigation found that federal emergency has been a political football played by both parties. Research from Carnegie Mellon and other sources shows that how much people affected by disasters get depennds on how your district votes.

Robert Benincasa is a producer for NPR Investigations. He researched and reported on the thousands of disaster buyouts Federal Emergency Management Agency or FEMA didn't want people to see.


Rogelio V. Solis / AP Images

As peak tornado season bears down on the Southeast, On Second Thought is looking at who gets aid after disasters. A recent NPR investigation found federal emergency money has been a political football for both parties. Research from Carnegie Mellon and other sources shows how much people affected by disasters get can depend on how their districts vote.

Robert Benincasa is a producer for NPR Investigations. He researched and reported on the thousands of disaster buyouts Federal Emergency Management Agency or FEMA didn't want people to see.


Ramon Espinosa / AP

Six months after hurricanes devastated the Southeast, Washington infighting has shelved a widely backed disaster aid package that President Donald Trump's allies in Florida and Georgia are desperately seeking.

Trump's opposition to aid to Puerto Rico — slammed by back-to-back hurricanes in 2017 — has sparked a standoff with Democrats demanding more aid for the island U.S. territory. Trump is feuding with the island's Democratic officials and railed against aid to Puerto Rico at a closed-door lunch with Senate Republicans last month.

Georgia Department of Agriculture

U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said he was extremely disappointed a disaster relief bill failed to clear the U.S. Senate earlier this week.

Much of the $13.45 billion relief package was set to help farmers impacted by Hurricane Michael.

Speaking in Newnan Friday, Perdue said he's just as frustrated as those affected.

Senate Votes No On Hurricane Disaster Relief

Apr 1, 2019
Grant Blankenship / GPB

A fight between President Donald Trump and Democrats over hurricane relief for Puerto Rico stalled a widely backed disaster aid bill that's a top priority for some of the president's Southern GOP allies.

Only about $600 million out of the $13.45 billion relief package was earmarked for Puerto Rico. The rest was intended for Southern farmers who had their businesses upended and in some cases literally ripped from the ground by Hurricane Michael last year.