Department of Natural Resources

Photo by Ray Bilcliff from Pexels

It’s nesting season for alligators in Georgia.

Female alligators can lay up to 40 eggs in nests that are typically 6 to 7 feet in diameter. The nests are often built in remote grassy areas, near the edge of a river bank or near a marsh.

Coastal Georgia Department of Natural Resources

The Department of Natural Resources is helping anglers — people who fish with a specific method using a rod and a line — safely return fish to Georgia’s waters.


Cindy Hill

Sea turtle nesting season is officially over. Scientists and volunteers counted 1,742 nests this year. That’s nearly half as many reported in 2016.


J. Cindy Hill

The number of nesting sea turtles along Georgia’s coast is down again this year following a record set in 2016. But that may not be something to worry about. 


We continued our look at Historically Black Colleges and Universities with Atlanta Journal Constitution reporters Eric Stirgus and Ernie Suggs. They recently rolled out a Re:Race series called “HBCUs: A Threatened Heritage.” The project looks at the enrollment numbers, finances, and the overall future of HBCUs in America. We also heard from some alumni and current HBCU students in Atlanta.

On March 1st, Georgia’s Department of Natural Resources will open its second annual Coyote Challenge.

Lauren Packard / NOAA/Flickr

Right whales are Georgia’s state aquatic mammal, and around this time of year they’re usually right off our coast having their calves. But this year, only three whales have been spotted, and none of them are calves. Environmental changes and human activity seem to be jeopardizing the endangered whales’ livelihoods.

So, how worried should we be? With us by phone was Clay George, biologist and head of right whale work for the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

 

 

  

 

The Bald Eagle's Triumphant Return In Georgia

Jun 27, 2017
Paul Malinowski / Foter

One of America’s most beloved species is making a comeback. The bald eagle was nearly extinct, before being labeled endangered in the 1960s. But a record number of bald eagle nests have been documented in Georgia this year, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.