confederate flag

Sarah Rose / GPB News

Former Kennesaw City Council member Jimmy Dickens stood in front of the city council Monday night with a plea for its members and the mayor. Across the street in Memorial Park, the Confederate flag was still flying high.

"Kennesaw is my home, Kennesaw is what I love," he said. "But I want Kennesaw to love me the same."

KELLY A. TYLER (2002) / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

NASCAR has banned the Confederate flag from all events and properties.

NASCAR says the Confederate flag “runs contrary to our commitment to providing a welcoming and inclusive environment for all fans, our competitors and our industry.” 

David Goldman / AP

A city in Georgia has voted to stop using taxpayer dollars to fund a veterans parade following a lawsuit by a group of Confederate descendants who were barred from flying the Confederate flag during the event.

The Alpharetta City Council unanimously voted to stop sponsoring the Old Soldiers Day parade, which it has co-hosted to honor war veterans for almost 70 years. In its early years, the parade was a tribute to local Civil War veterans.

“It’s just time for us to get out of this parade business,” Mayor Jim Gilvin said at the Monday meeting.

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

John Amis / AP Photo/File

On today’s special edition of "Political Rewind" we talk to former Georgia governor Roy Barnes. In 2001 he led a risky and controversial fight to remove the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag.

Barnes knew he’d have a fight on his hands: business and civic leaders wanted the flag changed and so did  the Georgians who saw the flag as a symbol of the state’s slave past. But there would be fierce resistance from those who were determined to honor the Confederate past. Making the change would require skilled political maneuvering.

To walk around Berlin is to constantly, inevitably, trip over history.

Almost literally, in the case of the Stolpersteine, or "stumbling stones," embedded in the sidewalks outside homes where victims of the Holocaust once lived.

Germany's culture of "remembrance" around the Nazi years and the Holocaust is a well-documented and essential part of the nation's character. Though occasionally political parties may challenge it, those elements have thus far remained thoroughly fringe.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Civil War ended 152 years ago, but some of its battles are still being fought in Henry County, Georgia.

On the grounds of Nash Farm Battlefield, there’s an outdoor wedding chapel, markers commemorating the Battle of Lovejoy and, until recently, a Civil War museum.

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Some of them came in a 20-truck caravan, flags flapping in the morning breeze. Some of them came with their children, holding miniature red, white and blue pinwheels and the remnants of breakfast. Some of them came from all corners of the state, riding from Jesup or Conyers or right down the road. But all of them came together to fight what they say is an attack on their history, their heritage and the Confederate flag.

On the morning of May 27, more than 200 people gathered in the field next to the Nash Farm Battlefield Museum in Henry County.

When 60-year-old Owen Golay talks about the two Confederate flags he flies in his front yard, he sounds like many Southern defenders of such symbols.

"It stands for heritage; it's a part of our history," Golay said.

But it's not really his history. Golay lives in rural Pleasantville, Iowa, about 40 miles from where he was born. He still carries a small Confederate flag that his father gave him as a child. But aside from some people way back in his family tree who fought on both sides in the Civil War, he has no real ties to the South.

Prison For 2 Who Threatened Violence At Black Child's Party

Feb 27, 2017
Douglas County Sheriff’s Office

A Georgia judge sentenced two people to lengthy prison terms for their role in the disruption of a black child's birthday party with Confederate flags, racial slurs and armed threats.

Jose Ismael Torres, 26, will spend 13 years in prison; Kayla Rae Norton, 25, is to serve six years, Atlanta news outlets report.

Both wept as the sentences were handed down Monday in Douglas County, west of Atlanta.

"Their actions were motivated by racial hatred," said Superior Court Judge William McClain.

Roswell Police Department

A former Roswell police sergeant is suing the city after being terminated for flying a Confederate flag outside of her home. Silvia Cotriss filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court and names the City of Roswell, the Chief of Police, and the City Administrator as the defendants.

Leaders of the National Cathedral in Washington recently made the decision to remove the Confederate Battle Flag from the landmark’s stained glass windows. Why does this flag – and really any symbol – hold so much power in our culture and society? We speak with a flag expert (also known as a vexillologist) Ted Kaye and social psychologist Clay Routledge about the historical and psychological importance of symbols.