comedian

Matt Misisco

He is, by his account, "World Champion." Of what? Depends on when you ask. 

It may be easier to pin down Judah Friedlander's resume as an actor and comedian in movies like Wet Hot American Summer, American Splendor, Meet The Parents and The Wrestler. Or maybe you'd recognize him — and his hats — from NBC's 30 Rock, where he played the slumpy and kind of sleazy Frank Rossitano.


John Paul Filo / CBS Broadcasting Inc

Mo Rocca follows the world of the living as correspondent for CBS Sunday Morning, panelist for Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me, and host of The Henry Ford's Innovation Nation.

His other beat is the departed. He is host of the Mobituaries podcast, now in its second season. In it, Rocca tells stories of people and things that have passed through this earthly plain with too little notice, and uncovers little known facets of iconic figures who did get a lot of ink.


Courtesy of Dad's Garage

Comedian and actor Scott Adsit has been on everything from Friends to The Office, but you may know him best as Pete Hornberger from the sitcom 30 Rock. Or perhaps as the voice of Baymax from Big Hero 6.

This weekend, he's in Georgia. Adsit is doing a two-night, four-show run at Dad's Garage in Atlanta. First, he stopped by On Second Thought to share stories about how improv influenced his acting career, why he never really got into stand-up comedy, and his connection to the Marvel Universe. 


Photo Credit: Yoon Kim

Hari Kondabolu is a comedian, writer and podcaster based in Brooklyn, New York. He has performed on "The Late Show with David Letterman," "Conan," "Jimmy Kimmel Live," and more. He's a regular guest on NPR's "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!," and he released his first Netflix comedy special, called "Warn Your Relatives," last year.

In that stand-up special, Kondabolu jokes about serious topics like politics, religion, racial prejudice and white guilt, which, he says, means his comedy may not be for everybody. He joined "On Second Thought" to talk about touring with his political material, the importance of diversity in comedy and the difference between being funny for a private and public audience.


Taylor Gantt / GPB

Writer, actor and comedian Maz Jobrani has been using humor to talk about race and stereotypes in American culture for more than a decade.

Jobrani, who is Iranian-American, has tackled these sensitive subjects through stand up comedy, including last year’s protests surrounding President Trump’s travel ban.

 

 

jufchicago / flickr

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in "That '70s Show," "Fargo," "Bob’s Burgers," and, of course, "Law and Order." However, he may be best known for his stand up specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." Gaffigan is in Atlanta this weekend for a live show. He told us there is an argument for comedians not to talk about the news.