coal ash

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A report from leading environmental advocates in Georgia describes how the toxins left over from burning coal for power are being stored by Georgia Power in direct contact with groundwater.  

  

The report from the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, The Altamaha Riverkeeper and the Coosa River Basin Initiative, and based on analysis of Georgia Power data, came one day before the only chance for Georgians to tell the federal Environmental Protection Agency what they think about plans to handle the management of those toxins, called coal ash, to Georgia’s Environmental Protection Division.   

 

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A new report by the Altamaha River Keeper, Environment Georgia and others looks at the Georgia data from a first ever national survey of coal ash storage by the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Cleaning Up Georgia's Coal Ash Ponds

Nov 13, 2017
Flickr

Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.