coal ash

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Several bills relating to the regulation of coal ash in Georgia made it through crossover day in the Georgia legislature and may still become law. But those bills did not include the high profile “lined storage bills” supported by the people of Juliette who live next door to one of the largest coal-burning power plants in the country.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

It was late on a rainy night when Fletcher Sams of the Altamaha Riverkeeper guided his truck down a long muddy road to Ken and Dorothy Krakow’s home on the banks of the Ocmulgee River. With him in a notebook were the results of their well testing. 

He laid out the bad news on their kitchen table after digging through his notebook with data from over 60 other homes.   

“It is tied at the very highest for the worst,” he said. 

Dorothy Krakow buried her face in her hands at the news. Ken Krakow cracked a joke.  

“Yeah. Wow. Congratulations to us,” he said. “What’s going on?”

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Residents of the town of Juliette worried about coal ash from Georgia Power’s Plant Scherer in their drinking water traveled to the capitol Monday to press lawmakers on a pair of coal ash bills.  

They wore matching T-shirts reading “Save Juliette,” made the 80-plus mile trek on charter buses and worked the rope line outside the house chambers,  hoping to speak representatives from around the state to press for passage of bills that would mandate coal ash be stored away from groundwater.  

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A Georgia bill relating to coal ash management that fizzled last year has now passed out of committee.    

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Gloria Hammond remembers the day the man from Georgia Power came to talk about buying the home she shared with her husband Cason.  They were just back from the hospital. The man gone no farther than the front yard.

 

“I said, ‘Look, I'm telling you right now, we're not selling nothing right now,’” Hammond said. “Because I already knew Cason was terminal.”

By terminal she meant Cason was already sick with the cancer that eventually took his life. By then, most everyone else up and down Luther Smith Road in Juliette had already sold out to the utility. 

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

When trash leaves your house and goes to the landfill, that landfill has features in place that keep liquids from the trash from getting into groundwater. Right now, those features are not required for Georgia landfills that store the toxic coal ash from power plants.

A bill filed this week in the Georgia Legislature would bring coal ash storage rules in line with the rules for your household garbage.

St. Simons Sound Incident Unified Command Joint Information Center

The Georgia Water Coalition’s annual “Dirty Dozen” list was released Thursday. It highlights serious pollution threats to waterways across the state.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

A report from leading environmental advocates in Georgia describes how the toxins left over from burning coal for power are being stored by Georgia Power in direct contact with groundwater.  

  

The report from the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, The Altamaha Riverkeeper and the Coosa River Basin Initiative, and based on analysis of Georgia Power data, came one day before the only chance for Georgians to tell the federal Environmental Protection Agency what they think about plans to handle the management of those toxins, called coal ash, to Georgia’s Environmental Protection Division.   

 

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A new report by the Altamaha River Keeper, Environment Georgia and others looks at the Georgia data from a first ever national survey of coal ash storage by the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Cleaning Up Georgia's Coal Ash Ponds

Nov 13, 2017
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Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.