Chattahoochee River

For three decades, Georgia and Florida have been battling over how to share a precious resource: water. Georgia has it, and Florida, which is downstream, says it's not getting its fair share. The dispute is once again headed to the U.S. Supreme Court, where Florida wants the justices to cap Georgia's water use. But a court-appointed special master recently rejected that idea.

More than 6 million people depend on water that starts at Lake Lanier, a reservoir northeast of Atlanta. It generates hydropower as its water is released from a dam into the Chattahoochee River.

Atlanta Trails

Many Atlanta roads are named after ferries and bridges, so at the request of listeners "40Watt" and Bill Witherspoon, we took a peek at the watery origins of these Atlanta roadways.


What makes Vidalia onions so special that they get their own festival — and declaration as Georgia's official state vegetable? We asked Delbert Bland of Bland Farms in Glennville, Georgia. He's been in the Vidalia business for decades and gave us a taste of the history and science behind this sweet onion.  

Mike Gonzalez / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia has been at war with Alabama and Florida over tri-state water use for decades. More recently, Tennessee entered the mix

The legal dispute began in 1990, when Alabama and Florida sued Georgia and the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) over a COE recommendation that a dam on the Chattahoochee River be used to supply Atlanta with water, rather than the states of Florida and Alabama. 

Keizers / Wikimedia Commons

The conservation group American Rivers has put the entire Apalachicola-Flint-Chattahoochee River basin on top of its list of Most Endangered Rivers for 2016.

They say overuse, an outdated management plan, and a decades-long conflict over the rivers could lead to lasting economic and environmental damage in Georgia, Alabama, and Florida.