CDC

New data from the Associated Press reveal more than a thousand failing dams in the U.S. that could have catastrophic consequences if they gave out. Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Grant Blankenship analyzed the information and learned Georgia is one of the most at-risk states. Find out which dams could cause the most damage for surrounding communities.


Derek Davis / Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says flu season is starting to ramp up — and it's not too late to reduce your risk with a vaccine.

But scientists have come to realize that flu vaccines are less effective for people who are overweight or obese.

Andrew Harnik / AP

So far, 18 people have died, including one Georgian, and more than 1,000 people have been suddenly sickened with severe lung illness related to using electronic cigarettes, health officials say.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Principal Deputy Secretary Dr. Anne Schuchat said during the Oct. 3 update that the latest numbers indicate the problem is only growing worse. 


AP Images/Nam Y. Huh

Last week, the FDA disclosed a criminal probe into electronic cigarettes as the number of vaping-related illnesses climbed. The enforcement action dovetails with an ongoing Centers For Disease Control and Prevention investigation into vaping-related illness in the U.S. 

Five hundred thirty people with a history of vaping have been diagnosed with mysterious lung injuries. Eight people have died. Five of those cases are in Georgia, with another being investigated here.


vaping
Steven Senne / AP

The Atlanta-based Centers For Disease Control and Prevention has launched a base of operations for a nationwide investigation into illnesses from e-cigarettes. 


Climate Central

Intense heat is getting worse with climate change as small increases in temperature can magnify extremes, according to a study by Climate Central, an independent organization of scientists and journalists reporting about climate change and its public impact.

Around the globe, it’s been another summer of blistering heat. Just last month, GPB reported that Georgia could see an average of 77 days each year with a heat index over 105 degrees by the end of the century, according to a study by the Union of Concerned Scientists.

That’s compared to an average of four days a year from 1971 to 2000.

Andrew Thomas Lee

From Summer blueberry to Thanksgiving pumpkin, pies are packed with memories and traditions. Everyone has their favorite, but you may not be experiencing everything this “infinite dessert” has to offer.

Paul Arguin and Chris Taylor, a married pair of scientists from the CDC turned pie-baking champions, encourage you to escape the flaky crust rut of making the same old pie, with their cookbook The New Pie.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

More than 100 people in six states, including 17 in Georgia, have most likely become ill from E. coli from ground beef, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Friday.

While officials have not yet identified a common supplier, distributor, brand or other source of the outbreak, the 109 people who've gotten sick all ate ground beef products in restaurants or in their homes, the CDC said.

Gregory Bull / AP

The Atlanta-based Centers For Disease Control and Prevention is trying to figure out the source of an E. coli outbreak that has sickened 72 people in five states, including Georgia.

Because no specific food, store or restaurant has been connected to the outbreak, the CDC has made no recommendations concerning foods or places to avoid.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar during an interview at the 2019 National HIV Prevention Conference in Atlanta.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Just over a month after President Donald Trump shared his goal to eliminate HIV in the next decade, his health secretary is out touting details of how the administration hopes to end transmission and prevent new diagnoses by 2030. 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that drowning is one of the top three causes of unintentional deaths for people under 29 years old, and the risk for black children between ages 5 and 14 is three times higher than for white children.

AP file

The CDC reports that Georgia has had one of the highest flu rates in the country during this winter. Georgia has seen more than 400 flu-related hospitalizations since the start of flu season in September, according to the Georgia Department of Public Health.

 

Andy Miller, editor of Georgia Health News, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss flu trends in the state and how to prevent illness until peak flu season ends in February.

 


Courtesy AP Images

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15 to 29-year-olds in the United States. A 2018 study from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention shows suicide rates increased by 16 percent in Georgia between 1996 and 2016.

 

Tech giant Facebook wants to help prevent suicide with artificial intelligence.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta says suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and according to a new report, the number of people who take their own lives has risen substantially since 1999. Per the report, nearly 45,000 Americans age 10 or older took their own lives in 2016. Georgia alone saw a 16 percent increase in suicides from 1999-2016.


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  • CDC Focuses On Hepatitis C Testing

HEPVU

Baby Boomers are six times more likely to have hepatitis C than any other age group, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

Viral hepatitis is a leading cause of liver cancer in the United States and hepatitis C is the most common type of viral hepatitis.


At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona. Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explained how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are using DNA technology to try and prevent future E. coli outbreaks.

 

The method is called genome sequencing and it could eliminate the guessing game when it comes to finding the source of E. coli outbreaks. With it, scientists can determine the exact food and location in which the contaminated produce originated.

Liz West / Flickr

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona.

 

"Do not eat or buy romaine lettuce unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona growing region," says a statement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "This includes any pre-packaged salads or salad mixes.”

 

Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explains how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

On Second Thought For Friday, April 27, 2018

Apr 27, 2018

It’s been seven months since Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico. Blackouts continue. Utility crews on the island are still in emergency restoration mode. As recovery continues on the island, Georgia Tech’s Economic Development Lab (EDL) has opened free office space in Atlanta’s Tech Square to entrepreneurs and researchers from Puerto Rico. It's an expansion of a program Georgia Tech has had in place since 2012.

Courtesy of Special Kneads and Treats

April is Autism Awareness Month. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates 1 in 68 U.S. children is on the autism spectrum.

 

Ten years ago, Tempa and Michael Kohler opened Special Kneads and Treats, a bakery in Lawrenceville. Like many bakeries, they make delicious cakes and other sweets treats. But what's special about the Kohlers' bakery is the employees: adults with disabilities.

This year's Pulitzer Prize winners and finalists were announced Tuesday. We listened back to interviews with four past and present honorees. Renee Montagne was named a 2018 finalist for her investigation examining racial disparity in maternal deaths. James Forman Jr. won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction for his book "Locking Up Our Own:  Crime and Punishment in Black America." We also revisited conversations with Alfred Uhry, who won the Pulitzer for drama in 1988, as well as Bill Dedman, who in 1989 won the prize for investigative reporting.  

What makes Vidalia onions so special that they get their own festival — and declaration as Georgia's official state vegetable? We asked Delbert Bland of Bland Farms in Glennville, Georgia. He's been in the Vidalia business for decades and gave us a taste of the history and science behind this sweet onion.  

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

The newest appointed director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is already facing serious accusations. Dr. Robert Redfield has been accused of fabricating or seriously botching HIV vaccine data. President Trump's appointee also has no experience running a public health organization. This problematic news comes months after the controversy with previous CDC director, Brenda Fitzgerald.

frankieleon / Flickr

The opioid crisis continues to ravage Georgia and the rest of the nation.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, prescription opioids caused more than 32,000 deaths in 2016.

Incirlik Air Base

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta save lives and eradicate sicknesses, but the CDC is also in show business. In its more than 70-year history, it’s captured the imagination of TV writers and filmmakers. So, could the monkey in the movie Outbreak actually spread disease? Could flesh-eating zombies like the ones in The Walking Dead actually be a reality? On Monday night, the Atlanta Science Festival separates fact from fiction.

Daniel Mayer / Wikimedia Commons

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has seen plenty of turmoil over the past week -- Director Brenda Fitzgerald resigned over financial conflicts of interest, and impending budget cuts are forcing the agency to drastically cut its overseas programs. What does all of this mean for the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked first with Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the CDC. He’s now the President and CEO of Resolve to Save Lives, a global health initiative of Vital Strategies. Later in the show we were joined by Andy Miller, editor and CEO of Georgia Health News.

A week ago, Brenda Fitzgerald resigned as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The revelation she holds financial stakes in a tobacco company -- and thus has a major conflict of interest -- comes as the CDC faces enormous budget cuts. The agency is preparing to downsize its global epidemic prevention programs by about 80 percent. Should we be worried about the CDC’s ability to do its job? We talked with former CDC director Tom Frieden and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.

Courtesy of Raed Mansour / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

On this edition of Political Rewind, another Georgian resigns from a high-level position in the Trump Administration.  We’ll discuss why the head of the CDC is out.  Also, Georgians respond to President Trump’s State of the Union speech.  Plus, we’ll look at news from the governor’s race: Stacey Evans wins a big endorsement and GOP candidates look to show fundraising muscle to compete with Casey Cagle as they face today’s disclosure deadline.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

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