A Cappella Books

Rachael Joyce

Revisionist History podcast host Malcolm Gladwell's books have opened up new ways to consider human behavior — introducing concepts like "stickiness," the "10,000 hour rule" and The Tipping Point

His newest New York Times best-seller asks why we are so bad at understanding people we don't know. It's called Talking To Strangers. 


Rachael Joyce

The Rachel Maddow Show is the biggest draw on MSNBC’s primetime line-up. The show tilts against Fox News’ Sean Hannity in the high stakes battle for cable news viewers. Both hosts have large and obsessive audiences, and both have seen double digit jumps in ratings since congress launched an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

That story was roiling when Rachel Maddow made her way onto the stage, at an event sponsored by A Cappella Books last Sunday, Oct. 13. On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott interviewed Maddow at the Fox Theatre. Today’s episode is part of the interview from Sunday.


If music is a universal language, then OneBeat has diplomacy down. It’s a group of 25 emerging musicians from around the world who collaborate on writing, producing and performing original music. They also tour select cities. A few of the members, Farid Ghannam, a singer, Ming Qi, a synthesist, Rodney Barretto, a percussionist and Free Feral, a string player and composer, stopped by the studio to talk to On Second Thought.


Frank Gargani

The first wave of punk rock growled out of the economic and social malaise of New York and London in the mid-1970s. But Los Angeles played a huge role in what came next, when punk's energetic D.I.Y. ethos began to diversify, cross genres and sprawl like the vast city itself.

One of the groups that sprouted in that time was the seminal punk band X. Three years ago, X's singer and bassist John Doe and music publisher Tom DeSavia pulled together first-hand accounts of the nascent scene from members of LA's tight-knit punk community. The resulting book, Under The Big Black Sun, was nominated for a Grammy.


The official start of summer is just around the corner. Whether you are headed to the lake or the beach, it’s the perfect time to pick up your next favorite summer read.

On Second Thought asked a group of Georgia independent bookstore owners to recommend their favorite big hits and hidden gems for summer. Jessica Osborne from E Shaver in Savannah, Janet Geddis from Avid Bookshop in Athens and Frank Reiss from A Cappella Books in Atlanta all shared their picks for the season.


Ted Anthony / Associated Press

Frank Reiss and Emmy Carmichael from A Cappella Books in Atlanta stopped by "On Second Thought" to share their recommendations for our "Southern Reading List." It's our series of authors and readers sharing books that define and reflect the South.

 

Carmichael recommends Caleb Johnson's "Treeborne" and Hannah Pittard's "Visible Empire." Reiss recommends Anne Gisleson's "The Futilitarians: Our Year of Thinking, Drinking, Grieving, and Reading" and Michael Farris Smith's "The Fighter."

 


Courtesy of Thomas Dunne Books / Courtesy of U.S. State Department

Stuart Eizenstat has worn many hats: U.S. ambassador to the European Union, Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, international lawyer.

 

He was also President Jimmy Carter's chief domestic policy adviser, a position which served as the basis for his new book, "President Carter: The White House Years."

 

In the history, Eizenstat details what he says is the underappreciated legacy of the Carter administration.

 

Among the accomplishments of President Carter that Eizenstat describes are the peace negotiations Carter facilitated between Egypt and Israel. Carter also passed the country's first comprehensive energy policy and deregulated some of America's biggest industries, including communications.