Cancer diagnoses

Courtesy of Boston Public Library

The network of rail lines and canals that gave Waycross its name now act as dividing lines for the community.

For a century, the canals carried runoff from the rail yard and other local industries. Generations of kids roamed along the banks and swam in the southeast Georgia heat. In 2015, four area children were diagnosed with rare cancers within the span of two months.


Courtesy of Susan G. Komen Greater Atlanta

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among Georgia women. The good news is more than half of deaths linked to the disease were prevented in the U.S. over the past three decades; however, there's a big racial gap in Georgia. African-American women are more likely to die from breast cancer than non-hispanic white women. The American Cancer Society released these findings.

Carol DeSantis is the lead author of the study and spoke with "On Second Thought" with the latest statistics. Janice McKenzie-Crayton also joined the conversation. McKenzie-Crayton is a three-time breast cancer survivor and chair of Komen Atlanta's Sisters of Promise.