cancer

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses a natural protector in our immune system that, somehow, gets turned against us in the micro-environment of some aggressive tumors.   The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPB Augusta SoundCloud page.


Courtesy of Boston Public Library

The network of rail lines and canals that gave Waycross its name now act as dividing lines for the community.

For a century, the canals carried runoff from the rail yard and other local industries. Generations of kids roamed along the banks and swam in the southeast Georgia heat. In 2015, four area children were diagnosed with rare cancers within the span of two months.


In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses new revelations about how our immune system can be prompted to battle and conquer cancer.

The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPB Augusta SoundCloud page.

Laura Coleman/GPB Augusta

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses advances in a technique doctors are using to diagnose the cancer, multiple myeloma.


GPB/ Taylor Gantt

Just about everyone knows someone who is or has been affected by cancer.   

 

According to the American Cancer Society, this year over 1.7 million new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States.  

 

People of color,  particularly African Americans, are more likely to die from cancer when compared to any other ethnic group in the U.S.

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses the progress scientists are making in engineering human t-cells that will target liver cancer.


In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses how two immunotherapies may work synergistically to battle certain tumors.  


American College of Radiology / National Cancer Institute

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South.  But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society.

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, the best-selling author who recently announced her illness by penning a personals ad for her beloved husband, has died at 51.

Rosenthal had ovarian cancer. Her longtime literary agent confirmed her death to The Associated Press.

The Senate is expected to vote this afternoon on the 21st Century Cures Act. It is considered landmark legislation that would provide funding for research programs like Vice President Joe Biden’s moonshot against cancer.

It will also make significant changes in how drugs are tested and approved.

The act passed in the House overwhelmingly and is expected to easily pass the Senate as well.

Michael Rivera / Wikimedia Commons

Within the span of two months in 2015, four children living in or near Waycross, GA were diagnosed with similar types of very rare and aggressive cancers. Three of the four have the very same cancer, and one little girl had a kind that’s even more rare. She recently lost her battle with the disease.

Their families and the community are still struggling to find out why and what, if anything, is being done to make sure other people don’t get sick.

There are less than 100 female black physicists in the United States. Hadiyah Nicole-Green, of the Morehouse School of Medicine, is one of those few women. And she's on the forefront of a new technology that uses lasers to target and destroy tumors. Professor Green has received a million dollar grant to push her research into clinical trials. 

She joins us to talk more about her medical breakthrough and why her fight against cancer is so personal. 

Rhythm Therapy: Beating Back Cancer

Aug 17, 2016
Linda Chen

There’s a special jam session that happens in Fayetteville, Georgia every Wednesday afternoon. The musicians are cancer patients who come together at Piedmont Fayette Hospital. They form a drum circle. The rhythms they make together helps relieve stress and create community. 

Producer Linda Chen dropped in on a recent drum circle session and brings us a head-bobbing audio postcard.

Lynn Wyatt

Brain tumors once thought to be inoperable can now be removed without a single incision through Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The procedure delivers small, highly precise doses of radiation to a specific area without damaging the rest of the brain. 

We speak with Dr. Shannon Kahn, radiation oncologist at Emory St. Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta, and cancer survivor Lynn Wyatt about the benefits of Gamma Knife surgery. 

Gary Meek/Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech Research Scientist Charlene Bayer is pioneering a new method for early cancer detection. No radiation, no fancy machines, just an inexpensive breathalyzer that can detect carcinogens caused by both lung and breast cancer.

Bayer explains how to use the technology and how it can be applied on a larger scale. 

pixbay.com

A group of faculty and student researchers at Kennesaw State University have recently discovered a new method for delivering vital proteins into human cells. This new method of cell penetration could have a number of important applications down the road, ranging from improvements to cosmetics all the way to aiding the fight against cancer.

We talk to KSU’s associate vice president of research Jonathan McMurry and graduate student Verra Ngwa about the science behind their team’s discovery. 

Mercer University

Macon poet Anya Silver says her poetry has helped her come to terms with mortality. Silver’s life could have taken a much different turn. She was first diagnosed with an aggressive and lethal form of breast cancer when she was 35 years old and pregnant. It didn’t stop her. She continues to teach English at Mercer University, and she's a writer. Her poetry earned her a spot as one of last  year's Georgia Author of the Year award recipients.

Michael Rivera / Wikimedia Commons

Something horrible is happening in Waycross, Georgia. Four area children were diagnosed with rare forms of cancer last year.