bump stocks

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On this edition of Political Rewind, the candidates for Mayor of Atlanta slug it out in their first runoff debate. Did we learn anything new about the matchup between Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood?

A Democratic state representative has introduced legislation to ban “bump stocks” in Georgia and one GOP candidate for governor is already attacking the measure. How will it fare in the 2018 session? 

In today's headlines:

  • Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance Bottoms square off in their first debate
  • A bump stock ban in Georgia could be on the horizon
  • Preparations for Monday's implosion of the Georgia Dome are moving forward

Two weeks ago, bump stocks were just an odd-sounding firearm attachment largely unknown outside gun enthusiast circles.

That all changed early last week with the deadly shooting in Las Vegas, where police discovered a dozen of the devices in the shooter's hotel room overlooking the city's neon-lit Strip. Now, Republicans and Democrats in Congress, the National Rifle Association and other pro-gun groups are asking for a fresh look at the legality of bump stocks.

In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, most Americans — regardless of party — favor tightening restrictions on firearms, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

But significant partisan divides remain — and perhaps relatedly, they exist alongside divides in knowledge about guns in America.

Eight-in-10 Americans told the pollsters they favor bans on assault weapons, high-capacity ammunition magazines and "bump stocks," an accessory used by the Las Vegas shooter that allows a semi-automatic rifle to fire like an automatic weapon.

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Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The National Rifle Association says it is open to new regulations on bump stocks, devices possessed by the mass shooter in Las Vegas that can be used to fire rifles similarly to automatic weapons. This comes as top Republicans in Congress appear open to the idea of a federal law banning the devices.