Brian Kemp

John Amis / AP

Tuesday on Political Rewind, the legislature is back in session after a week-long break. They have been studying deep cuts Gov. Brian Kemp has proposed to the mid-year budget.

Republican House leaders want to restore funds for what they say are essential services, including state food safety inspectors.


Gov. Brian Kemp
John Amis / AP

Members of the Georgia House of Representatives are rejecting some midyear budget cuts proposed by Gov. Brian Kemp.

They say the Republican governor wanted to cut too deeply on some items.

Kemp is proposing more than $200 million in midyear reductions in state spending, citing a shortfall in state revenues. House subcommittees on Thursday recommended putting back more than $2.8 million of Kemp's proposed reductions. 

The full Appropriations Committee is scheduled to vote Tuesday on amendments to the current spending plan.

David J. Phillip / AP

Friday on Political Rewind, what is the role of Georgia in election year politics? National attention turns to the Peach State in 2020.

Earlier this week, Lucy McBath announced her support for Bloomberg. The endorsements come as the former New York City mayor tries to recover from the leaked remarks he made in a 2015 speech defending the “stop and frisk” policing policy.


GPB

Gov. Brian Kemp says he foresees a “great budget” when the second round of budget discussions end this week.

Just 12 days into the 2020 session under the Gold Dome, lawmakers decided to take a second break — after having discussed at length already in January concerns they had with the governor’s proposed 4% cuts to the budget this year and 6% cuts next year.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said the new state court building in Atlanta is a “majestic” building that pays homage to both the rule of law and the criminal justice reforms enacted by former Republican Gov. Nathan Deal.

At a dedication ceremony for the 6-story, 6-acre building Tuesday, the Georgia-born jurist said that Georgia leaders must look ahead to ensure that people continue to be treated fairly under the eyes of the law.


Andrew Harnik / AP

Tuesday on Political Rewind, it is a crowded field in the race for the Senate seat held now held by Gov. Brian Kemp appointee Sen. Kelly Loeffler. A feisty battle between Loeffler and Rep. Doug Collins is sparking division between GOP leaders.

Our panel discussed the latest developments in that race.


Wikimedia

Monday on Political Rewind, formal meetings in the legislature were put on hold last week as agency heads and legislative leaders discussed Gov. Brian Kemp's proposed budget cuts. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Ariel Hart discussed the impacts on Georgia health issues.

And, in other health news, the federal government is signaling it is likely to approve the governor's waiver designed to lower insurance premiums through government subsidies. The proposal would assist insurance companies in paying for medical bills for Georgians with insurance plans from the Affordable Care Act's exchanges. 


John Amis / AP

Thursday on Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp has offered a sharp rebuke to lawmakers who have called a halt to the legislative session to try and resolve an escalating budget fight. Without using his name, Kemp attacked Speaker David Ralston, who called for the seven-day suspension of the session.


Elijah Nouvelage / AP

Gov. Brian Kemp and state Superintendent Richard Woods are announcing a plan Tuesday to cut five mandatory standardized tests for Georgia public school students, including four in high school. The Republican officials are also trying to cut the length of state tests and evaluate local tests that Georgia’s 181 school districts give to evaluate student progress.

Both Woods and Kemp oppose the current amount of testing, part of a national backlash to a system largely built by Republicans in Georgia.

Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp made an appearance Tuesday morning at the Georgia Freight Depot, where hundreds of people in longterm recovery from addiction gathered to celebrate Addiction Recovery Awareness Day.

The message from the community to Kemp is that people in recovery come from across the state. They get better, they buy homes and they vote,  Executive Director of the Georgia Council on Substance Abuse Neil Campbell said.

"It's not just an Atlanta thing," Cambpell said. "It's not just a legislature thing. It's a Georgia thing that there are people in recovery all over who want to help."

But as much as they want to help, they need help, too.


Jeff James / Flickr

Monday on Political Rewind, we took an in-depth look at sports betting from two of the leading advocates for a law enabling betting in Georgia; the CEOs of two of Atlanta's major sports organizations.

What are the opportunities and risks for Georgia associated with the legalization of some specific forms of sports betting?


Monday on Political Rewind, there is one less contender in the Democratic race for David Perdue’s seat in the U.S. Senate. Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry has announced he will quit that race and run instead for a seat on the DeKalb County commission.

Several key rural legislators are pushing back against Gov. Brian Kemp’s demands for deep cuts in the state budget. House Appropriations Chairman Terry England said he fears the cuts will hurt efforts to improve health care in rural areas of the state.

Kemp has told lawmakers his cuts are necessary to protect the state against an economic downturn.


John Amis / AP

On Thursday's Political Rewind, we waded into impeachment news to check on how Georgians may be reacting to the ongoing trial of President Donald Trump. Georgia’s attorney general added his name to a letter from the top prosecutors in 21 other states who are calling impeachment an unconstitutional partisan effort.

In news surrounding the presidential race, Sen. Bernie Sanders is showing gains in national polling and in key Democratic primary states. Our panel analyzed his surge.


GPB

Despite a state audit critical of Georgia's popular film tax credit, Gov. Brian Kemp has no plans to rush into making possible adjustments.

Kemp said any decision involving changes to the film industry credit should require a "very methodical" approach.

The audit by the Georgia Department of Audits and Accounts said Georgia's film tax credit "been overstated," and the report did acknowledge the tax incentive has increased the production of movies, television, and interactive entertainment in Georgia and has created jobs.

Georgia’s Republican governor and first lady have announced a slate of legislative measures they want to see enacted this year to combat human trafficking.

Gov. Brian Kemp and first lady Marty Kemp said the proposals unveiled Tuesday build on work already being done by the administration. A spokesman for Kemp said the legislation will be introduced next week. The measures will require the legislature's approval in order to become law.

Ga. House of Representatives stream

Gov. Brian Kemp told lawmakers Tuesday his $28.1 billion budget includes millions in savings that don’t require drastic cuts to services Georgians need while some agency heads said slashing spending would not be easy.

Speaking to the joint House and Senate Appropriations committees, the Republican talked about his spending plan and the listed several examples of streamlining operations.


Governor's Office of Planning and Budget

Gov. Brian Kemp’s latest budget proposal would increase state spending to $28.1 billion for the next fiscal year, largely driven by increases in formula-based funding for education and health care plus a pay raise for public school teachers. 

The proposal comes as many other state agencies have been asked to cut back.

The governor’s budget report released Thursday kicks off the next phase of budget discussions at the state Capitol, where lawmakers have been greeted with the news of tepid tax collections as the larger economy continues to grow.

The amended budget proposal for fiscal year 2020, which ends June 30, has been revised down slightly from $27.5 billion to $27.4 billion as the governor’s office projects only a slight growth in the amount of money collected from taxes and fees.

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On Thursday's Political Rewind, we discussed Gov. Brian Kemp’s 2020 State of the State address to the General Assembly earlier.

The governor took the opportunity to lay out his legislative priorities during the speech before a joint session of the General Assembly.

Our panel will discuss the issues he highlighted and those he omitted. 


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Speaking on the state House floor in front of representatives from Georgia’s executive, legislative and judicial branches, Gov. Brian Kemp said the state of the state is strong.

“And folks, we’re just getting started,” he said.

The governor, entering his second year in office, painted an extended metaphor of the state as a house under construction.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp will give his State of the State address at 11 a.m. Thursday.

He calls it his, "blueprint for a stronger, safer and more prosperous Georgia."

Kemp's second annual State of the State speech comes amid questions about whether he can cut income taxes and deliver a campaign promise to raise teacher pay, while also trimming the state budget.

The governor has touted an agenda for the upcoming year that includes reforming state adoption law, combating human trafficking and fighting street gangs.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Wednesday on Political Rewind, we tackled a range of issues that will be considered this year in the Georgia legislature, including sex trafficking and a state takeover of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. 

Some Georgia farmers interested in growing hemp will be paying close attention. They have been cautioned they cannot move forward with growing the potentially lucrative crop until the state finds funds for overseeing production.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

More than 2,600 lawmakers and business leaders filled a ballroom at the Georgia World Congress Center Wednesday to hear several top politicians share their perspectives on the state’s economy.

The overall message of the morning was that business is booming in Georgia: from low unemployment rates to more companies expanding their operations across the state. But state officials have difficult decisions to make regarding proposed budget cuts as slowing tax revenues don't match up with larger growth seen elsewhere.

Ken Lund / flickr

Friday on Political Rewind, Georgia legislators are set to take up residence at the state Capitol once again next week. The 2020 session of the General Assembly gets under way on Monday.

Our panel discusses what you can expect from the legislature.


Georgia House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, speaking with the press ahead of the 2020 Georgia General Assembly.
Donna Lowry / GPB

The top Republican in Georgia’s House of Representatives is anticipating a lengthy 2020 legislative session as state lawmakers grapple with tax and budgeting rules.

During his annual pre-session press conference House Speaker David Ralston, R-Blue Ridge, laid out his expectations and offered a preview of the upcoming General Assembly.

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s a look at the biggest political stories of 2019.  A new governor put his unique stamp on Georgia, an unexpected resignation put the state front and center in the race for Senate, and two Georgia members of Congress announced their departures. 

GPB

2020 is shaping up to be a busy year for Georgia politics.

The economy is doing well, but the state government is making some significant budget cuts.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp’s proposal to expand Medicaid with a waiver-application process is being met with backlash.


Gov. Brian Kemp on Friday issued an emergency declaration for Fulton County following a catastrophic failure of Grady Memorial Hospital's internal piping system that rendered multiple floors of the hospital inoperable.

A 2-foot water pipe burst, causing extensive electrical damage on several floors. The hospital said 158 beds will be inaccessible for several months.

Elijah Nouvelage / AP

Today on Political Rewind, Kelly Loeffler’s success in business is an asset Gov. Brian Kemp trumpeted when he named her as Sen. Johnny Isakson’s successor. But do her far flung interests pose ethical questions as she assumes her position in the Senate? Our panel weighs in.

Some 55,000 Georgians face a loss of their food stamps as Sonny Perdue’s USDA sets in motion tougher work requirement rules for SNAP recipients. We’ll look at what’s behind the changes.


Sam Bermas-Dawes / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, our panel looks at what's in stake in the case after a federal judge ordered Gov. Brian Kemp to submit to two hours of questioning in a lawsuit alleging Georgia election processes have violated voter rights.

And the 6th District Congressional battle appears to be coming into sharper focus as yet another GOP contender signals she may abandon the race. Are we heading to a contest between the Republican who once held the seat and the Democrat who defeated her?


Pages