Brian Kemp

Tony Dejak / AP

The Georgia Department of Public Health has issued a health advisory following the death of a second person here in Georgia connected to vaping and the use of e-cigarettes. That person had a history of nicotine vaping and DPH does not yet know whether other substances were used.

Ezra Morris / GPB

Starting this week, state agencies have a little less money to get things done.   

Gov. Brian Kemp ordered budget cuts last month, encouraging departments to cut redundant spending and warning of a potential future economic downturn.     

But the lawmakers who craft the budget aren’t so sure. They met last week to hear more about the Georgia economy. 


GPB News

Georgia’s new economist says there is “about a 50-50 chance of a mild recession” next year amid uncertainty about the state’s revenue projections and Gov. Brian Kemp’s call for cuts to state agencies.

Members of the House and Senate appropriations committees heard economic outlooks from Jeffrey Dorfman and other presenters during two days of hearings in Atlanta this week.


John Bazemore / AP

Today on Political Rewind, we dive deep into the proposed budget cuts that Gov. Brian Kemp has ordered all state agencies to make.


Pexels

While Gov. Brian Kemp has asked state agencies to find ways to cut their budgets in the next fiscal year, the initial proposals submitted amount to an overall increase in state spending.

 

According to documents shared online by the governor’s Office of Planning and Budget, the state’s amended budget for the rest of the fiscal year (running July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020) would decrease by about $50 million, or two-tenths of a percent. 

However, the record-setting $27.5 billion budget would increase by 1%, or close to $300 million, for FY 2021 – even with cuts offered by many state agencies. Add to the mix recent news about record jobs growth, a booming economy and Georgia being the “number one state to do business” and many are left wondering what the cuts are all about. 

In this Feb. 14, 2019 photo, Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., leads a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington.  Gov. Brian Kemp has announced he is accepting applications from those looking to fill Isakson's seat when he steps down at the end of 2019.
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp takes an interesting approach to replacing Sen. Johnny Isakson by inviting all who are interested to apply for the job. Meanwhile, are we getting closer to learning which Democrats will compete for the seat?


GPB News

Freshen up your resume and bust out your thesaurus for the cover letter – it's application season for those seeking to be the next person to represent Georgia in the U.S. Senate.

Gov. Brian Kemp announced Tuesday that his office will be vetting would-be lawmakers who submit an application, including contact information, a resume or C.V., confirmation that you meet age and residency requirements and an acknowledgement that the public will get to see your interest in being appointed.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp is launching a new statewide initiative to promote Georgia-made products and bring new business to rural parts of the state.

At Faircloth Forest Products in Swainsboro, midway between Macon and Savannah, Kemp said he was fulfilling another campaign promise: to showcase economic opportunities available to companies that choose to invest in Georgia outside of the metro Atlanta area.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, in the wake of Johnny Isakson’s surprise decision to retire, two U.S. Senate seats are now on the ballot in Georgia in 2020. As Republicans and Democrats engage in complex maneuvering to benefit in the aftermath of Isakson’s announcement, we’ll take a behind the scenes look at the races for each seat.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

As rain began to fall on Georgia’s coast from Hurricane Dorian, Gov. Brian Kemp implored those who did not evacuate to stay vigilant and safe as state officials were making final preparations for the recovery phase of the storm.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp orders state agency heads to ignore requests by legislative leaders to attend fall budget hearings and send his mandated 4% cuts directly to him. Why is Kemp cutting legislators out of the process and what does it say about support under the “Gold Dome” for his dramatic cuts across the board? We’ll ask our panel for answers.

 


NOAA

Gov. Brian Kemp has expanded the state of emergency to nine more counties ahead of Hurricane Dorian’s arrival near the Georgia coast.

A state of emergency now exists in Appling, Bacon, Bulloch, Clinch, Echols, Evans, Screven, Tattnall and Ware counties.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

The pace of mandatory evacuation from the Georgia coast ahead of Hurricane Dorian Tuesday was steady even if it wasn’t a torrent.  

 

By midmorning Tuesday, the eastbound lanes of I-16 were empty despite having been open to westbound traffic since 8 a.m. Tommy Veal works out of the Georgia Department of Transportation office in Dublin, about 120 miles from the coast. He said whether it was packed or sparse, the contraflow was doing what it was supposed to. 

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp discusses evacuations and emergency plans for Hurricane Dorian during a news conference Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, in Savannah, Ga.  Kemp ordered a mandatory evacuation affecting all of Georgia's six coastal counties.
Russ Bynum / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Hurricane Dorian is disrupting life along Georgia's sea coast. Even as it appears the storm may skirt by the state, Gov. Brian Kemp is experiencing a major test in weather emergency. How is he responding? Saving lives comes first, but politics always follows. As we look into the storm response, our panel weighs in on how weather has played a key role in politics over the decades.

Gov. Brian Kemp discusses evacuations and emergency plans for Hurricane Dorian during a news conference Monday, Sept. 2, 2019, in Savannah.
Russ Bynum / AP

While the exact path Hurricane Dorian will take up the Atlantic coastline is uncertain, the message from Gov. Brian Kemp and other state officials remains the same: if you live on the coast, evacuate.

About 400,000 Georgians who live east of I-95 are under mandatory evacuation orders as the storm looming off the Florida coast continues its slow churn.

Gerald Herbert / AP

After ordering a mandatory evacuation of parts of six Georgia coastal counties, Gov. Brian Kemp and local officials are urging caution as Hurricane Dorian — now a Category 4 storm  — approaches the coast of Florida.

Those living east of I-95 in Glynn, Chatham, Liberty, McIntosh, Bryan and Camden counties are ordered to evacuate effective noon Monday, according to the governor's office. Officials will also start contraflow of traffic on I-16 starting 8 a.m. Tuesday.

National Hurricane Center

UPDATE 4:30 p.m.: Gov. Brian Kemp has declared a state of emergency for 12 Georgia counties — Brantley, Bryan, Camden, Charlton, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh, Pierce and Wayne — as Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida’s coastline.

Seth Wenig / AP

Former Georgia Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams has announced a multimillion-dollar initiative to staff and fund voter protection teams in battleground states across the country ahead of the 2020 elections.

Abrams said Tuesday that she would focus on that effort rather than run for president herself. She made the announcement during a speech before a labor union convention in Las Vegas.

Spc. Tori Miller / U.S. Army National Guard

Gov. Brian Kemp is telling agencies around the state to prepare for spending cuts.

In a letter on Tuesday, Kemp directed government agencies to develop budget proposals with a 4% spending reduction this fiscal year, ending in June of 2020, and a 6% cut in fiscal year 2021, beginning July of next year.


In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta. In two years, federal payments to hospitals treating a large share of the nation's poor will begin to evapor
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, an in-depth look at rural health care in Georgia.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, competing visions for creating a better future for Americans are being showcased in Atlanta this weekend.


Gov. Brian Kemp’s administration is investigating after a Georgia Health News and WebMD report alleged airborne toxins are in Cobb County. Local officials and the company are also responding. Get an update from GPB’s Ross Terrell.

An Alabama company wants to mine for heavy minerals in southeast Georgia about four miles from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. The proposal from Twin Pines Minerals promises 150 to 200 jobs, but it’s also raised serious environmental concerns. On Second Thought hears about the issue.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, warning signs emerge that Gov. Brian Kemp’s plans for a partial expansion of Medicaid in Georgia may not win full support from the federal government and could cost far more than the state may be able to pay.

PCOM

South Georgia's Colquitt County has its first four-year medical school in Moultrie and Gov. Brian Kemp will speak during the Aug. 6 ribbon cutting.

The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine is designed to help meet physician workforce needs in rural Georgia, President Jay Feldstein said in a release.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, a newly released poll offers clues about Georgian’s opinions on how Gov. Brian Kemp is performing in office, their feelings towards President Trump, and which Democratic presidential candidate is their current top choice. 


Stephen Fowler / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Brian Kemp has nominated a veteran lawyer to serve as the judge on a new court designed to handle complex business matters. 

Walt Davis, a partner at Atlanta firm Jones Day, has been tapped to head up the new statewide business court. Georgia voters approved the court last November and the legislature codified it with bipartisan support.  

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry becomes the latest to announce his candidacy for U.S. Senate in 2020. 

AP

The 2018 election for governor between Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams may be over, but second quarter fundraising numbers show healthy war chests for parts of their political futures.

Kemp raised more than $726,000 from April to June and is sitting on more than $1.2 million just a few months into his term as governor. He raised close to $21 million in the race against Abrams, and this quarter's haul will go towards a potential rematch in 2022.

Sean Powers / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, Democrats across the state are crafting their strategy to attempt a majority in the next state legislative election. Hoping to mobilize voters around the heartbeat bill and internal GOP party struggles, party leaders are optimistic.


Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello, left, speaks in Washington. Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, right, at the state Capitol in Atlanta.
Evan Vucci/John Bazemore / AP Photo

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosello is calling on Gov. Brian Kemp to address allegations that Puerto Rican citizens are being discriminated against when applying for a Georgia drivers license. 

In a statement Rosello said that a federal lawsuit alleging discrimination when attempting to obtain a drivers license is "absurd." 

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