Brian Kemp

Elijah Nouvelage / AP

Today on Political Rewind, Kelly Loeffler’s success in business is an asset Gov. Brian Kemp trumpeted when he named her as Sen. Johnny Isakson’s successor. But do her far flung interests pose ethical questions as she assumes her position in the Senate? Our panel weighs in.

Some 55,000 Georgians face a loss of their food stamps as Sonny Perdue’s USDA sets in motion tougher work requirement rules for SNAP recipients. We’ll look at what’s behind the changes.


Sam Bermas-Dawes / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, our panel looks at what's in stake in the case after a federal judge ordered Gov. Brian Kemp to submit to two hours of questioning in a lawsuit alleging Georgia election processes have violated voter rights.

And the 6th District Congressional battle appears to be coming into sharper focus as yet another GOP contender signals she may abandon the race. Are we heading to a contest between the Republican who once held the seat and the Democrat who defeated her?


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

A federal judge says Gov. Brian Kemp must answer some questions about his time as Georgia's top elections official as part of a wide-ranging lawsuit challenging how elections are administered.

U.S. District Court Judge Steve Jones ruled last week that the governor will need to answer two hours' worth of questions about comments he made about increasing minority voter turnout and his actions as chair of the State Election Board.


Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, the senior-most Republican in Georgia’s congressional delegation announces he will not seek re-election. Why has Rep. Tom Graves joined the GOP exodus from Congress? 


Mary Grace Heath, Office of the Governor

The wait is finally over: Gov. Brian Kemp has formally announced his pick to replace retiring Sen. Johnny Isakson.

Kelly Loeffler is a political newcomer and longtime Republican donor who has decades of experience in the financial services sector. She will be the second Georgia woman to serve in the Senate, and, if she wins a special election next November, she would be the first woman elected to the Senate.

Her appointment comes as President Trump and others urged Kemp to appoint someone else, and as Democrats look to flip the state in 2020.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On Wednesday's Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp officially announced that Kelly Loeffler is his pick to replace the retiring Sen. Johnny Isakson. An Atlanta business executive, Loeffler is new to the game of politics. 

What can we expect from Loeffler as a senator and as a senatorial candidate leading up to Georgia’s 2020 elections? And, now that the announcement has been made, how will conservative Republicans react to Kemp’s choice? How will Rep. Doug Collins, President Donald Trump’s choice for the Isakson seat, respond?


Elijah Nouvelage / AP

Gov. Brian Kemp on Wednesday named Atlanta businesswoman Kelly Loeffler as Georgia’s next U.S. Senator as the Republican party in Georgia seeks to maintain control of two Senate seats, the state House and its presidential vote heading into the 2020 election cycle.

Loeffler will be the second-ever woman to represent Georgia in the Senate, and, if she wins a special election next fall, she will be the first Georgia woman elected to the Senate. In her remarks, she acknowledged that it will take work for her become known to voters in Georgia.

“But here’s what folks are gonna find out about me: I’m a lifelong conservative, pro-Second Amendment, pro-military, pro-wall and pro-Trump,” she said. “And I make no apologies for my conservative values, and will proudly support President Trump’s conservative judges.”


Sam Bermas-Dawes / GPB News

Today on Political Rewind, we are live from the studios of WUGA in Athens. We will discuss the impending announcement from Gov. Brian Kemp about his decision regarding Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat. At the moment, Atlanta business executive Kelly Loeffler seems likely to be the pick, despite pressure from President Donald Trump to tap a fierce ally from Georgia, Rep. Doug Collins.

How will Georgia conservatives react to this perceived rebuke of the president? Will Collins, if he is not tapped for the seat, plan on contesting it in 2020?

We also hear Sen. Isakson's farewell address from the U.S. Senate floor.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

After months of speculation, hundreds of resumes submitted and a holiday weekend Twitter war mentioning jellybeans and jorts, Gov. Brian Kemp is set to finally announce who Georgia’s next U.S. Senator will be.

 

Kemp will be joined by members of Georgia’s Congressional delegation, state lawmakers and party leaders, grassroots activists and his appointee at 10 a.m. Wednesday in his ceremonial office.

John Amis / AP Photo

Gov. Brian Kemp has a big decision to make: who will be Georgia’s next U.S. Senator?  

The first-term Republican has leaned towards Kelly Loeffler, an Atlanta businesswoman who co-owns the local WNBA team and runs a bitcoin trading and storage company. But President Trump, whose Twitter endorsement helped push Kemp to a gubernatorial primary victory, has called for Rep. Doug Collins (R-Gainesville) to be selected.  

Rep. Doug Collins R-Ga., speaks on a news conference during the House Republican members conference in Baltimore, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019.
AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana

Today on Political Rewind, As we await word on Gov. Brian Kemp’s appointment to fill Johnny Isakson’s seat in the U.S. Senate, President Trump advocates for Rep. Doug Collins. Will Kemp agree or will he go with his own choice?


Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, President Donald Trump jumps the gun and declares his choice for Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat, even before Gov. Brian Kemp announces his own preference. Will Kemp bend to the president’s will or make an independent decision? Our panel weighs in on the possible fallout from the president’s impulsive decision to back Congressman Doug Collins for the job. 

"I think the governor needs to consider that the president is looking for partisan loyalty," Spelman College's Marilyn Davis said.


Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp sets Monday as the deadline to apply for Sen. Johnny Isakson’s seat. More than 500 people have offered themselves for the job, including some prominent GOP leaders and well-known Georgians. We ask our panel if they expect more big names to come forward in the final days of the process.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Georgia is currently ranked third among states with most uninsured residents.  More than 1.4 million Georgians were without insurance in 2018.

Governor Kemp announced the second of two healthcare waiver proposals to increase coverage on Monday. If approved, the waivers will allow the state of Georgia to remain compliant with the Federal Affordable Care Act — making changes to the health insurance market in the state without expanding Medicaid.

Georgia is currently one of 14 states that have chosen to not fully expand Medicaid.


John Bazemore / AP

Today on Political Rewind, we sit down for an exclusive interview with Georgia’s Speaker of the House David Ralston. Our conversation’s timing could not be better.

 

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will get a chance to weigh in on Gov. Brian Kemp’s health care waivers. Kemp’s proposals would give more authority to the state for health insurance powers that are now held by the federal government. Where do Georgians stand on the state government’s role in health care coverage?

 


John Amis / AP

Gov. Brian Kemp released a plan Monday to expand Medicaid to the state's poorest able-bodied adults, on the condition that they work, volunteer, receive job training or attend school.

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on Political Rewind, the deep partisan divide among Georgia congressmen is apparent as the U.S. House votes to launch a formal impeachment investigation into President Donald Trump. How will the weeks ahead play into 2020 elections here and across the nation?


Pixabay

On this edition of Political Rewind, Democratic presidential candidates are dueling over a variety of proposals for improving delivery. We’ve heard them tout their various plans for Medicare for All or a public option to Obamacare, all while promoting “universal health care.”

What do these terms really mean and how would they be paid for? Our panel explores the health care debate’s terms and explains the proposals.

 


Pexels

Overall grades for Georgia's schools fell in the 2018-2019 school year, with Gov. Brian Kemp and state Superintendent Richard Woods repeating their calls Friday to overhaul grading methods.

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Today on Political Rewind, Georgia Democrats rally around their chances to win key races in 2020 at their annual dinner. In attendance: both declared and potential candidates for the two U.S. Senate seats on the ballot in Georgia.


Stephen Fowler

It's been about 10 months since Gov. Brian Kemp took office — with a pledge to lift up rural Georgia. 

Now, he has launched a Rural Strike Team, designed to boost economic development across the state. And he's embarked on a "Georgia Made" tour to highlight local companies and their successes. 


Tony Dejak / AP

The Georgia Department of Public Health has issued a health advisory following the death of a second person here in Georgia connected to vaping and the use of e-cigarettes. That person had a history of nicotine vaping and DPH does not yet know whether other substances were used.

Ezra Morris / GPB

Starting this week, state agencies have a little less money to get things done.   

Gov. Brian Kemp ordered budget cuts last month, encouraging departments to cut redundant spending and warning of a potential future economic downturn.     

But the lawmakers who craft the budget aren’t so sure. They met last week to hear more about the Georgia economy. 


GPB News

Georgia’s new economist says there is “about a 50-50 chance of a mild recession” next year amid uncertainty about the state’s revenue projections and Gov. Brian Kemp’s call for cuts to state agencies.

Members of the House and Senate appropriations committees heard economic outlooks from Jeffrey Dorfman and other presenters during two days of hearings in Atlanta this week.


John Bazemore / AP

Today on Political Rewind, we dive deep into the proposed budget cuts that Gov. Brian Kemp has ordered all state agencies to make.


Pexels

While Gov. Brian Kemp has asked state agencies to find ways to cut their budgets in the next fiscal year, the initial proposals submitted amount to an overall increase in state spending.

 

According to documents shared online by the governor’s Office of Planning and Budget, the state’s amended budget for the rest of the fiscal year (running July 1, 2019, to June 30, 2020) would decrease by about $50 million, or two-tenths of a percent. 

However, the record-setting $27.5 billion budget would increase by 1%, or close to $300 million, for FY 2021 – even with cuts offered by many state agencies. Add to the mix recent news about record jobs growth, a booming economy and Georgia being the “number one state to do business” and many are left wondering what the cuts are all about. 

In this Feb. 14, 2019 photo, Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., leads a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington.  Gov. Brian Kemp has announced he is accepting applications from those looking to fill Isakson's seat when he steps down at the end of 2019.
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp takes an interesting approach to replacing Sen. Johnny Isakson by inviting all who are interested to apply for the job. Meanwhile, are we getting closer to learning which Democrats will compete for the seat?


GPB News

Freshen up your resume and bust out your thesaurus for the cover letter – it's application season for those seeking to be the next person to represent Georgia in the U.S. Senate.

Gov. Brian Kemp announced Tuesday that his office will be vetting would-be lawmakers who submit an application, including contact information, a resume or C.V., confirmation that you meet age and residency requirements and an acknowledgement that the public will get to see your interest in being appointed.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp is launching a new statewide initiative to promote Georgia-made products and bring new business to rural parts of the state.

At Faircloth Forest Products in Swainsboro, midway between Macon and Savannah, Kemp said he was fulfilling another campaign promise: to showcase economic opportunities available to companies that choose to invest in Georgia outside of the metro Atlanta area.


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