Brad Raffensperger

Georgia Secretary of State's OFfice

The secretary of state's office is reviewing a petition signed by more than 1,400 people asking for another, deeper look at the state's new voting system. 

The petition, delivered Monday morning, alleges several issues with the state's certification process of the Dominion Voting System, which includes ballot-marking devices, precinct-level scanners, electronic poll books and the election management system.

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger certified the machines Aug. 9 after a third-party company tested the equipment "against the requirements set forth for voting systems by the Election Assistance Commission 2005 Voluntary Voting System Guidelines and the State of Georgia."

Andrew Harnik / AP

One day after a ruling was issued that requires Georgia to ditch its outdated touchscreen voting machines in 2020, a group of voters asked a federal judge to block the state from replacing it with a new $107 million ballot-marking device system.

Thursday, U.S. District Court Judge Amy Totenberg ordered the state to move to a paper ballot-based voting system after this fall’s municipal elections and to pilot hand-marked paper ballot voting in some elections this fall.

The new system selected by the secretary of state’s office satisfies that first order, as Dominion Voting Systems’ Image Cast X BMD combines a touchscreen tablet with a printer to produce a paper-based summary of a voter’s selection with a QR code that is then scanned and stored.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger says Georgians should have faith in the newly-announced voting machines coming for next year’s elections.

On Monday, Raffensperger announced the selection of Dominion Voting Systems as the state’s next voting machine vendor, with a $106 million price tag.

Georgia’s outdated touchscreen direct-recording electronic voting machines will be replaced by ballot-marking devices. Direct-recording electronic machines cast each vote on a memory card. But the BMDs print out a paper ballot with a summary of the voter’s selection plus a QR code that is then scanned and stored.

Andrew Harnik / AP

Today on Political Rewind, Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger has annonced new voting machines will be put in place ahead of the 2020 Presidential Primary. Where will the machines come from and how long will it take to get poll workers trained? Is it enough time for the primary election in March?


Grant Blankenship/GPB

A federal judge who said Georgia officials allowed its election system to “grow way too old and archaic” will soon decide if hundreds of county and municipal elections in 2019 must be conducted on hand-marked paper ballots.

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump's internal polls show him behind in Georgia, Florida and other key states. His campaign rally in Orlando gave the audience a glimpse of the themes on which he will run.


Andrew Harnik / AP

We have an election date: Two days after county elections officials expressed concerns about the still-to-be-decided presidential preference primary date, the secretary of state's office announced that voters will head to the polls March 24, 2020. 

That date is just before the deadline for a new voting machine vendor to fully implement a new system across the state's 159 counties.


President Donald Trump gives his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress, at the Capitol in Washington, as Vice President Mike Pence, left, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi look on. In Trump's estimation, the good times began to roll for t
Doug Mills / The New York Times via AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Democratic incumbents in Georgia's congressional delegation who are also running for seats in 2020 show no unanimity on the impeachment of President Donald Trump.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Georgia could be one of the last states to set its date for the 2020 presidential preference primary, which is one of the first elections to be held on a soon-to-be-selected new voting system. 

In years past, Georgia has joined a number of states in holding the presidential primary on the first Tuesday in March known as "Super Tuesday," or what then-Secretary of State Brian Kemp dubbed the "SEC primary" in 2016.

But this year elections officials are holding off on a date until the dust has settled on the procurement process to replace Georgia's 27,000 outdated direct-recording electronic voting machines. 


Another federal judge is allowing a second lawsuit alleging problems with Georgia's current voting system to continue.

Judge Steve Jones Thursday denied the state's request to dismiss the case, filed by Stacey Abrams-affiliated Fair Fight Action, Care in Action and a slew of local churches. 

Grant Blankenship/GPB

As the state Senate is set to vote on a sweeping elections bill that would authorize $150 million in spending to modernize Georgia’s touchscreen direct-recording electronic voting machines, the long-term cost of the proposed solution remains a point of contention.  

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A bill that would upgrade Georgia’s voting machines is winding its way through the Georgia Senate after clearing the House earlier this week.

HB 316 calls for Georgia to purchase touchscreen ballot-marking devices with a paper component, and makes numerous changes to how election law deals with absentee voting, voter registration and how votes are tallied.

New Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger has been following the bill’s progress closely, testifying at many of the subcommittee and committee hearings. He says that county elections officials overwhelmingly support ballot-marking devices as the best option for voters, and he thinks so, too.

While the bill was being heard for the first time in a Senate subcommittee on Thursday, I sat down with Raffensperger to talk about the bill and the future of Georgia’s elections.

Read the transcript of our conversation below.

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp gives a thumbs-up to supporters, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Athens, Ga.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Monday is a pivotal day in Georgia politics. Brian Kemp is being sworn in as the state’s 83rd governor while Geoff Duncan becomes lieutenant governor and Brad Raffensperger takes on the role of secretary of state.  It’s also the first day of the legislative session. The Georgia General Assembly now has 40 days to pass new legislation and shape the future of the state.

GPB Politics Reporter Stephen Fowler and “Political Rewind” host Bill Nigut stopped by “On Second Thought” to explore both of these topics.


Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

When Brad Raffensperger is sworn in as secretary of state Jan. 14, he will assume control of an office that’s been accused of suppressing minority votes in the past, he'll be a party to several lawsuits in the present and he will oversee changing Georgia’s voting system in the future.

The Johns Creek Republican has been working to transition into the role since his Dec. 4 runoff victory against Democrat John Barrow, and says he has been working with many different people to make sure he is prepared for the job.

The Atlanta Press Club Runoff Debates were held Nov. 2 for Public Service Commission District 3 and Secretary of State.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, early voting has begun in two key runoff races. Voters will pick a new Secretary of State, who will take charge of election machinery and processes that are the subject of raging controversy. They’ll also vote in a race that will help determine Georgia’s energy future. Our panel looks at the contests.


Candidates' websites

Whether you voted in the Midterm Elections or not, registered voters are eligible to vote in the Dec. 4 runoff for the office of secretary of state and the District 3 seat for the Public Safety Commission.

Republican Brad Raffensperger and Democrat John Barrow face off to fill the seat vacated by Brain Kemp, who won the hard-fought contest for the governorship against Democrat Stacey Abrams.

People hold signs as they protest the election in the rotunda of the state capitol building Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, more court cases and the counting goes on as Georgian's wait for a clear winner in the governor's race.

GPB

UPDATED Nov. 8: A runoff for secretary of state has been called for Dec. 4.

ORIGINAL STORY: In the race to replace Brian Kemp as secretary of state, no candidate received enough votes to declare victory. As final votes continue to be counted, Republican Brad Raffensperger and Democrat John Barrow appear to be headed for a runoff. 

With 99 percent of precincts reporting results Raffensperger, a state representative, leads Barrow by just over 28,000 votes. The lead is not enough, however, to put Raffensperger over the top.

Political Rewind: Blowout

Jul 25, 2018
(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp rolls to an overwhelming victory in the GOP runoff election for governor, and he’s already begun a blistering line of attacks against his Democratic opponent, Stacey Abrams. 


Political Rewind: Election Day In Georgia

Jul 24, 2018
(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, it’s election day in Georgia. 


Political Rewind: The Final Hours

Jul 23, 2018
(AP Photos/Todd Kirkland, John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a furious final weekend of campaigning in the GOP governor’s race.