Black History Month

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When you hear the name Rosa Parks, you probably flash back to your black history month education.

 

She's often credited as the woman who refused to move to the back of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955, leading to a series of boycotts.

But before Rosa Parks, there was Claudette Colvin.  

 

 


La'Raven Taylor/GPB

The Super Soaker toy gun was on the top of nearly every kid's wish list in the '90s, and it made summer heat a literal blast. The game-changing toy has racked up more than $1-billion in sales. It was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame in 2015. 

The man who invented the Super Soaker is Lonnie Johnson. While the toy water gun may be Johnson's most widely known invention among consumers, he has made contributions to the world of nuclear and mechanical engineering far beyond pump action toy. 


As you look back over the black history education you received in your childhood, you definitely heard about Dr. Martin Luther King and his movement of non-violent protest.  

 

 

But that wasn't case for every freedom fighter during the civil rights movement. Instead of turning the other cheek, some people were hiding guns in the countryside in case they had to literally shoot back.

 

 


Courtesy of AP Images

In 1832, playwright and peformer Thomas Dartmouth Rice used theatrical make-up to create a supposedly black character. The character's name was Jim Crow. That name later came to represent a system of extra-judicial terror and racial segregation laws that ended in 1965, but the recent political crisis in Virginia shows dressing up in blackface did not.


Offshore drilling and budget negotiations are taking top priority with state lawmakers this week. GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler reflected on the last few days at the Georgia State Capitol. 

A new radio documentary will highlight the roots of gospel music during Black History Month. The four-part documentary is called "Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul," and Grammy Award-winning gospel musician, Cece Winans will host the program. Bob Marovich is a historian and founder of the Journal of Gospel Music. He spoke with "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott about his contributions to the project. 

 


Courtesy of AP Images

A new radio documentary will highlight the roots of gospel music during Black History Month. The four-part documentary is called "Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul," and Grammy Award-winning gospel musician, Cece Winans will host the program. 

Bob Marovich is a historian and founder of the Journal of Gospel Music. He spoke with "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott about his contributions to the project. Marovich also told how Rosetta Tharpe, Aretha Franklin and Chance the Rapper have all incorporated praise music into hip-hop and rhythm and blues.


Luis Sandoval, Simon David

An upcoming documentary aims to highlight Atlanta soul musician Lee Moses for a new era. The documentary, "Time and Place," focuses on Moses' life and the soul scene in Atlanta during the 1970s. The documentary takes its name from Moses' solo album. The album has become a staple of Southern soul despite not finding commercial success when it was released. 

 

Filmmaker Simon David stopped by "On Second Thought" to discuss the documentary and how it traces Atlanta's soul scene through those who remember it. Doris Moses, Lee Moses' widow, also joined the conversation.

 

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One night in 1955, 14-year-old Emmett Till was visiting his family in Mississippi when he was kidnapped by a gang of white men and killed after he whistled at a white woman in a grocery store.

 

The two men behind the crime were eventually acquitted by an all-white jury.

But the pictures of Emmett Till’s body during his open-casket funeral sparked outrage across the country and fueled the Civil Rights movement in the 1960’s.

 

 


Courtesy of Tom Roche/"Alley Pat: The Music is Recorded"

“On Second Thought” began celebrating Black History Month by learning about the man who was nicknamed the “Mouth of the South,” James “Alley Pat” Patrick. Atlantans heard the disc jockey in 1949 on the city’s first black-owned radio station, WERD. Patrick was born on Dec. 2, 1919, in Montezuma, Georgia. His radio career began in 1951 at WERD.  

In addition to hosting a radio show, Patrick was instrumental in the Civil Rights movement. He was friends with activists and leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr., Hosea Williams and Andrew Young. Patrick was also known as a bail bondsman, as he bailed out activists from jail during the 1960s.


This week we’re hearing how some descendants are passing along Gullah heritage to the next generation. Patricia West is a writer and professor at Savannah State University. She was inspired to document her family’s roots after discovering her great great-grandmother’s grave on a trip to the family cemetery. 

The Scott-West family is also looking for ways to celebrate their history. Later this week, we will join them at the centuries-old cemetery where their American heritage begins, for a libations ceremony honoring ancestors.

February is Black History Month. Canada, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands also have months to commemorate black achievements. Host Celeste Headlee opens the Gripe Bag and talks about why a month doesn’t cut it.

 

 

HEADLEE: "Black History Month was the brainchild of eminent historian Carter Woodson. Woodson had a doctorate from Harvard in the 1920s, which is pretty amazing history, if you ask me.

 

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February is Black History Month here in the United States. Since 1976, every president has set aside the month to honor and remember African American history.

But is designating one month just for Black History appropriate? We tackle that question in the first part of our series about Black History Month.

We discuss this idea with Daniel Black. Black is an award-winning novelist and an African American Studies Professor at Clark Atlanta University. 

 

PINTEREST

February is a time to celebrate influential figures in African-American history. And our guest today is certainly one of those trailblazing figures.

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One of the ways African-Americans have shared the pain and the pleasure of the black experience is through music.  

 

Black artists have been an essential part of almost every genre of music. And black songs are often catalysts for change and enhanced public awareness.

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Each week during Black History Month, we will bring you a discussion centered around African American issues. In this episode, we discuss the role of black women in society and the difficulty of being a double minority.

 

We sit down with Stephanie Sears of Clark Atlanta University. She is an adjunct professor of Africana Women’s Studies. We discuss some of the issues facing black women today, what steps can be taken to achieve greater equality, and the idea of the “Angry Black Woman.”

This February is Black History Month, a time when the nation honors the contributions of African Americans. On Second Thought host Celeste Headlee says she doesn't really like Black History Month, but not for the reasons you might expect.