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The dust has now settled on bills sent to Gov. Brian Kemp’s desk from this year’s legislative session.

Kemp had 40 days from Sine Die to weigh in on more than bills and resolutions passed by the state House and Senate during the 40-day legislative session.

The governor vetoed 14 measures plus several line items in the record-setting $27.5 billion FY2020 budget, including mandatory recess for some elementary school students, a study committee to revisit the state’s border with Tennessee and North Carolina and some tightened school safety measures.

Former first lady Michelle Obama makes a surprise visit to Spelman College in Atlanta on Saturday, May 11.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Former first lady Michelle Obama made a surprise visit to Spelman College ahead of a book tour event in Atlanta for her autobiography, "Becoming."

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

The House has passed a $19 billion disaster aid bill that would deliver long-sought relief to farmers, victims of hurricanes and floods, and rebuild southern military bases. Democrats controlling the chamber are trying to dislodge the legislation from a Senate logjam over aid to hurricane-slammed Puerto Rico.

GPB News

Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams says she's still considering running for president in 2020.

Abrams answered "yes" when asked in an interview with Pod Save America airing Thursday afternoon if she was still contemplating joining the crowded Democratic presidential field.

Abrams has also been floated as a possible vice-presidential pick, though she recently downplayed the idea, telling ABC that "you don't run for second place."

http://www.jmsburncenters.com

A major burn center in Georgia will soon get even larger.

Doctors Hospital in Augusta is embarking on a $75 million expansion of the Joseph M. Still Burn Center.

Hospital officials say it will double the number of patient rooms as well as build a six-level, 550-space parking deck.

The Augusta Chronicle reports that the project is the largest investment at the hospital since it was built in 1973.

Carolyn Meadows at the National Rifle Association's annual meeting of members in Indianapolis. Meadows was elected president of the NRA during a board meeting Monday, April 29, 2019.
Michael Conroy / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Democrats ponder their next steps in the effort to unseat David Perdue now that Stacey Abrams announces she won’t make the race.


Demonstrators protest the Food and Drug Administration's policies related to pharmaceutical opioids at a rally in front of the Health and Human Services headquarters in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the opioid crisis is a nationwide plague, killing or holding hostage to drug addiction countless Americans.


U.S. Rep. John Lewis will deliver the commencement address at Emory University's Oxford College.
Michael Dwyer / AP Photo

As spring comes to an end, graduation ceremonies quickly approach and commencement speakers are tasked with inspiring graduates as they enter the workforce. This year, Georgia’s colleges and universities will host notable speakers from across the nation, including Daymond John, Sally Yates, John Lewis, Andrew Young and Deborah Roberts.

Russ Bynum / AP Photo/File

A recent study by the American Lung Association shows the air along Georgia's coast and in the mountains is clean and unpolluted. But in the metro Atlanta area, residents should be wary of what they're breathing in.

National Senior Vice President of Public Policy Paul Billings spoke with On Second Thought about what it means that five metro Atlanta counties received failing grades on air quality while the cities of Augusta and Savannah earned A's.


Edith Carson-Supino, NOAA Fisheries

For years, the deepening of the harbor in Savannah has been one of the most eagerly awaited boosts to Georgia’s economy. With a deeper harbor comes more goods to move across the country.

But a deeper harbor will also make life harder for the endangered Atlantic Sturgeon and its smaller cousin, the Short-Nose Sturgeon.


Former Congressman John Barrow has annonuced a campaign for Georgia State Supreme Court.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia officials fear that a ruling by the Department of Justice could cost the state millions of dollars in lottery revenues and jeopardize funding for Hope Scholarships and pre-k programs.


Lefteris Pitarakis / AP Photo

While the Trump administration has put a plan to expand offshore drilling on hold, seismic testing could still happen off the Georgia coast.

John Amis / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp marks an early milestone in his tenure as the chief executive of the state, he’s been in office for 100 days. We take a look at what he’s accomplished so far and at controversies, he’s stirred up, too.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

It’s springtime in Georgia. The weather is warming, gardens are blooming and animals, well, they’re having babies. Lots and lots of babies. Sometimes, those babies need help.

“It’s going to be non-stop this month,” wildlife rehabilitator Kim Wright said. She lives in the city of Byron.


President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive to speak at the "Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit," Wednesday, April 24, 2019, in Atlanta.
Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump is in Atlanta today, speaking at a national conference on drug abuse. Our panel looks at how the Trump Administration has dealt with opioid abuse, which the president has called a national crisis.

 

 


U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter, a Republican who represents Georgia’s 1st Congressional District spoke at the 2019 Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta.
Robert Jimison / GPB

U.S. Congressman Earl "Buddy" Carter represents a large part of Georgia's coast. Some of the counties in his district are among the hardest hit in the state by the opioid crisis. Carter is also the only pharmacist currently serving in Congress. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

It's taken about a hundred years for coyotes to move in and fully saturate every corner of the South. As coyotes settled in, they began putting predator pressure on the still-growing white-tailed deer population that it hasn't experienced in a long, long time.

Now, a new analysis of the of coyotes caught and released in the largest study of coyotes in the South suggests that as they change the ecology of deer in the region, deer are in turn changing coyotes.


Emily Jones / GPB News

The movie “Jaws” famously shows us a shark’s eye view of swimmers in the water, their legs kicking while the shark prepares to attack.

 

We know that sharks don’t really go after people like the movie’s monster great white. But we still have a lot to learn about how they detect their prey. A researcher at Georgia Southern University is trying to change that.

 

It turns out, understanding sharks’ senses could help people make a living on the water.


Stephen Morton / AP

The life of a Revolutionary War hero often called the "Father of the American Cavalry" may be a rare window into the complexities of gender.

Gen. Casimir Pulaski was a Polish nobleman who fought on the side of American colonists before dying in 1779 near Savannah. There had long been a monument to Pulaski with what were thought to be his remains buried in the base. Though, no one was ever 100% sure.


Matt Slocum / AP Photo

 

As golf fans head home, Augusta is still buzzing from the energy of Tiger Woods, who won his fifth Masters on Sunday.

It’s been over a decade since Tiger won a green jacket, the ceremonial garb given to the tournament’s champion every year.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah State University is testing a new machine that could help law enforcement solve more crimes. It’s the first of its kind in Georgia.

Bret Lane / travelingmamas.com

 

The Masters, one of golf's most prestigious events, tees off this morning at Augusta National Golf Club.

 

Defending champion Patrick Reed will be looking to earn his second green jacket, the treasured prize bestowed on every Masters winner.

Kimberly Vardeman / Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday marks six months since Hurricane Michael blew through parts of south Georgia. With planting season just a few weeks away, Georgia cotton growers are keeping an eye on the weather. 

 


AUGUSTA NATIONAL

The Masters begins tomorrow at the legendary Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia. It's among professional golf's most prestigious tournaments, bringing in big names like Dustin Johnson, Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods.

Last week, the golf course made history, hosting its first women's tournament: the Augusta National Women's Amateur. On Second Thought spoke with Bob Harig, senior golf writer for ESPN who joined the program from Augusta, about what it took to get women on the famous green. Anya Alvarez, former Ladies Professional Golf Association player and women's sports journalist, also joined the conversation from New York.


Ashley Rasys / University of Georgia

Geneticists at the University of Georgia have accomplished the first ever editing of the genes of a lizard with the gene editing tool CRISPR.  

 

The scientists weren’t shocked that the process worked, but they were surprised at the extent to which it was effective. That’s because the technique they were pursuing was a kind of work around for a peculiarity of reptile reproduction. 

 

 

David Goldman / AP

 


 

The first ever Augusta National Women’s Amateur Tournament ended this weekend with Wake Forest senior Jennifer Kupcho coming out on top.

 

Kupcho bested 71 other golfers to win the tournament, finishing 10 strokes under par to close out the event on Saturday.

Robert F. Bukaty / AP

A bill passed by the Georgia legislature this year will expand access to drugs that can prevent HIV infection.

 

PreP is short for pre-exposure prophylaxis, and when taken faithfully, PreP drugs can actually prevent people who get exposed to HIV from getting infected by the virus.

 

 


Pam Fessler / NPR

Three-quarters of a million people would likely lose their food stamps later this year under a new proposal by the Trump administration. The goal is to encourage able-bodied adults to go to work and get off government aid. But opponents predict people would go hungry instead, if the rule goes into effect.

A public comment period, which ends Tuesday, has so far drawn more than 28,000 comments overwhelmingly against the proposed rule.


State Rep. Ed Setzler, R-Acworth, asks questions during a committe hearing at the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta.
David Goldman / AP Photo

Georgia is on track to have the toughest abortion laws in the country – and to have that law challenged in court.

Followed by a smattering of “Shame!” from the gallery, the Georgia House gave final passage to HB 481, which would effectively ban abortion once a heartbeat is detected, around six weeks into pregnancy and before most women know they are pregnant.

Georgia State Capitol
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, it's the final days of the 2019 legislative session and some bills are moving at light speed while others are fighting howling headwinds.  Are some Republicans losing heart in supporting the heartbeat abortion bill?  Just what is a Frankenbill and how has it been weaponized to protect a state takeover of Hartsfield Jackson Airport?  How has the bill allowing production and distribution of medical marijuana coming down from what appeared to be a big high?  

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