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  • Atlanta Institutes Overnight Scooter Ban
  • Gwinnett County Dismissing Misdemeanor Marijuana Cases
  • More Active Hurricane Season Predicted

Courtesy of Dad's Garage

Comedian and actor Scott Adsit has been on everything from Friends to The Office, but you may know him best as Pete Hornberger from the sitcom 30 Rock. Or perhaps as the voice of Baymax from Big Hero 6.

This weekend, he's in Georgia. Adsit is doing a two-night, four-show run at Dad's Garage in Atlanta. First, he stopped by On Second Thought to share stories about how improv influenced his acting career, why he never really got into stand-up comedy, and his connection to the Marvel Universe. 


Mary Beth Meehan

If art is supposed to start conversations, then “Seeing Newnan” is working. The project mounted 19 large-scale photographs of residents on buildings around Newnan, Georgia.

Artist Mary Beth Meehan’s large-scale photographs of residents in Newnan have exposed the shifting demographics of the town. A resident, who protested the image of two Muslim schoolgirls in the town square, got more than a thousand responses from others who embrace a more inclusive vision of the town.


Taylor Gantt / GPB

Originally aired on August 21, 2018:

 

This Saturday, thousands of Muslims across Georgia will begin observing one of the most holy days in the religion of Islam.

 

Eid al-Adha is known as the "Festival of Sacrifice" in Islam, commemorating the prophet Abraham and the sacrifice he promised to God.

 

 


  • Muslims In Georgia Prepare For The Holy Day Of Eid al Adha
  • Gwinnett County Throws Out Marijuana Cases Due To Hemp Confusion
  • Progressive National Baptist Convention Wraps Up In Atlanta


  • Atlanta Puts Nighttime Ban On E-Scooters
  • Demolition Halted On Site Of Country Music's First Hit
  • Forecasters Say Above-Average Hurricane Season Now More Likely  


Sophia Saliby / GPB

A stop-work order issued has halted demolition of 152 Nassau Street after it began Thursday, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Earlier this month, the city of Atlanta approved a demolition permit to tear down the building to make way for a new Margaritaville Resort.

The site briefly served as a recording studio for Okeh Records when music pioneer Ralph Peer came from New York to the South to set up a temporary recording studio.

NOAA

Forecasters now say we could be in for a more active hurricane season than they originally predicted. 

 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the El Niño weather pattern, which suppresses hurricane activity, has ended. That means it's more likely this hurricane season will be above normal.

 

Forecasters are now predicting 10 to 17 named storms this season. An average season has 12.

Rebecca Hammel / U.S. Senate Photographic Studio

Republican U.S. Sen. David Perdue says he has concerns about “red flag” gun laws that would give judges authority to temporarily remove a person’s guns if they are considered dangerous to themselves or others.

Speaking to a group of reporters in his Atlanta office during a wide-ranging interview, he said he could not comment on any specifics until a bill has been drafted.

CREDIT MAPPING INEQUALITY, RICHMOND UNIVERSITY

A report by financial news and content company, 24-7 Wall Street, identifies the 25 most-segregated cities in America. Four are in Georgia, and one of those is in the top five.

The area covering Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell is number 22. Columbus comes in at 19. Macon is number 11. Albany, Georgia, comes in at No. 3.


Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced on Thursday a nighttime ban on e-scooters and bikes. Starting Friday, the dockless devices won’t be available for rent between 9 p.m. and 4 a.m.

The decision comes on the heels of multiple fatal crashes involving scooter riders. Four riders have been hit and killed since May.


Michael Sohn / AP

Authorities say another electric scooter rider has died in a metro Atlanta wreck.

Atlanta police say 46-year-old Quineterry McGriff, clothed in all black, ran a red light during rush hour traffic Tuesday morning and crashed into a truck.

  • Activists Seek Solution For Overcrowding Issue At Fulton County Jail
  • Augusta City Officals Confirm Federal Investigation Of Government Acitivities
  • Comcast Expands Internet Program For Low-Income Georgians


  • More Ga. Communities Join Lawsuits Targeting Opioid Manufacturers and Distributors
  • Calls Grow For Fulton Co. To Deal With Jail Overcrowding
  • Sen. Perdue Weighs In On Potential Gun Legislation Following Mass Shootings


Ross Terrell / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Faith leaders and activists want Fulton County commissioners to deal with overcrowding at the county jail. A small group gathered Wednesday outside of the Fulton County government center, after speaking at the commissioner’s meeting.


On this edition of Political Rewind, the shockwaves reverberating from the massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio dominate the news headlines across the country and here in Georgia.

 


 

Washington Post

Several Georgia communities are involved in one of the largest civil trials in U.S. history. The consolidated case is unfolding in federal court in Cleveland, Ohio, with local governments as the plaintiffs and opioid manufacturers and distributors as defendants.

The case is so complicated a special master proposed grouping the participants into an unprecedented “negotiation class” to try to settle, and participants debated the idea at a hearing Tuesday.  U.S. District Judge Dan Polster, who’s pushed for a settlement in general, showed interest in the novel idea.


  • Kemp Calls For State Agency Budget Cuts
  • Augusta City Government Under Federal Investigation
  • Atlanta United Move To Finals Of U.S. Open Cup

John Locher / Associated Press

President Donald Trump is headed to both Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, Wednesday in response to the recent mass shootings in the two cities.

Along with the previous week's shooting in Gilroy, California, there were 34 people killed and dozens injured in a single week.

Rick Rojas is also in El Paso. He's the new national correspondent for the South at The New York Times. He joined On Second Thought to give us an update on the situation — and the sentiment — in the aftermath of the El Paso shooting.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019

Aug 7, 2019

About two dozen Georgia counties and cities are involved in one of the largest civil trials in U.S. history.  They’re some of about 2,000 local governments suing opioid manufacturers and distributors. 

Learn about a proposal floated Tuesday to group participants into an unprecedented “negotiation class.”  University of Georgia Law Professor Elizabeth Burch joins On Second Thought.

Also, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Steven Rich from the Washington Post joins On Second Thought to outline how court proceedings are used to get documents and data that show where massive amounts of the drugs have gone in Georgia -- and the deadly results.


Spc. Tori Miller / U.S. Army National Guard

Gov. Brian Kemp is telling agencies around the state to prepare for spending cuts.

In a letter on Tuesday, Kemp directed government agencies to develop budget proposals with a 4% spending reduction this fiscal year, ending in June of 2020, and a 6% cut in fiscal year 2021, beginning July of next year.


GovTrack

Among the races for U.S. House of Representatives around the country, few are as closely watched and contested as Georgia's 7th Congressional District. After five-term Republican Rob Woodall declared he would not seek re-election, several have considered entering the race. Challengers include Woodall's 2018 opponent, Georgia Legislators, a former NFL star, business executives and a number of first-time politicians. 

Hear from the candidates who hope to represent Georgia's 7th Congressional District. Each candidate was given two minutes to explain the top issue that has driven them to run for the U.S. House of Representatives. 

Ron Harris / AP

The first death from Legionnaires' disease related to an outbreak of Legionella at the Sheraton Hotel in Downtown Atlanta was confirmed Tuesday by the Georgia Department of Public Health.

There are now 12 lab-confirmed cases of Legionnaires’ disease, including one death, and 61 probable cases, DPH spokeswoman Nancy Nydam said Tuesday. That's up from 55 suspected cases and 11 confirmed.

The Sheraton voluntarily closed July 15. The first set of environmental samples were collected four days later and additional samples were collected July 29, Nydam said.

In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta. In two years, federal payments to hospitals treating a large share of the nation's poor will begin to evapor
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, an in-depth look at rural health care in Georgia.

  • Atlanta City Council Allocates $1.5m For HIV/AIDS Housing
  • Atlanta's Dept. Of Transportation To Oversee Dockless Scooter Permits
  • Atlanta United Plays U.S. Open Cup Semi-Finals Game Today

Wes Browning

Mining below the surface of ordinary lives has made Joshilyn Jackson a multiple New York Times best-selling novelist.

Her newest book, Never Have I Ever, ratchets things up to thriller level when a new neighbor knocks at Amy’s door. The sultry and charming stranger, Roux, hijacks the agenda at book club, and soon moves onto Amy’s life with a blackmail scheme to expose a long buried secret.


About 250 Atlanta citizens with HIV or AIDS could face eviction. Willoughby Mariano, a reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and Patrick Saunders, editor of Project Q Atlanta, join On Second Thought to discuss why a dispute between contractors and the city of Atlanta is making it harder for the clients of the nonprofit group Living Room to pay the bills.


  • Georgians Can Weigh In On Coal Ash Management In The State
  • Atlanta Hotel Remains Closed After Outbreak Of Legionnaires' Disease
  • After Three E-Scooter Deaths In Atlanta, New Permits Still Frozen 


  • Georgia Supreme Court Finds Prosecutor Caused Mistrial Intentionally
  • Atlanta Department Of Transportation Could Take Over E-Scooter Regulation
  • Report: Toxic Coal Ash Is Submerged In Georgia Groundwater


Grant Blankenship / GPB

A report from leading environmental advocates in Georgia describes how the toxins left over from burning coal for power are being stored by Georgia Power in direct contact with groundwater.  

  

The report from the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, The Altamaha Riverkeeper and the Coosa River Basin Initiative, and based on analysis of Georgia Power data, came one day before the only chance for Georgians to tell the federal Environmental Protection Agency what they think about plans to handle the management of those toxins, called coal ash, to Georgia’s Environmental Protection Division.   

 

 

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