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Grant Blankenship / GPB

During the 1930s, Macon, Georgia was the nation's most redlined city. That term was not used until much later, but the practice -- denying mortgage loans or municipal services that effectively drew a line around areas based on race or income -- was common. Redlining is now illegal, but as GPB's Grant Blankenship reported in 2016, finding affordable housing in Macon -- and many of Georgia's growing cities -- is tough.


Ross Terrell / GPB News

The Fair Housing Act is 50 years old this year. Former President Lyndon Johnson implemented this landmark piece of civil rights legislation days after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. King often said housing was a key victory in the struggle for African-American equity in the United States.

We spoke with Dan Immergluck, a professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University. He discussed how legislation from 50 years ago shaped how housing in Georgia functions today.


atlantaga.gov

  • Job Training Grant Money Goes Unspent In Fulton County
  • 600 Jobs Coming To Columbus With Colorado-Based Employer
  • Health Departments Along Coast Begin Offering Flu Shots

Life expectancy nationwide has dropped for the second year in a row, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
CDC

The life expectancy of Americans is shorter for the second consecutive year, dropping from 78.7 to 78.6 years, according to the latest report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, who is exploring a presidential run in 2020, was in Georgia Saturday morning to listen to voters and help the Democratic Party of Georgia canvass ahead of this November’s midterm elections.

The term-limited Democrat spoke to about 45 volunteers at the DeKalb County Coordinated Campaign field office just outside of Atlanta before knocking on voters’ doors in Ellenwood.

Hickenlooper said he was in Georgia because of a conversation he had with gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams.

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, evangelical leaders and GOP politicians are continuing to voice their support for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh even as the controversy over allegations of sexual assault continue to cloud his confirmation.


atlantaga.gov

  • Plant Vogtle Vote Due By Monday
  • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau To Open Atlanta Office
  • Atlanta City Council Holds Listening Session On Street Name Changes

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

A vote that could determine the fate of Plant Vogtle must come by Monday.


atlantaga.gov

  • Family Of Georgia Tech Shooting Victim Sues The University
  • Kemp Releases School Safety Plan
  • District 28 Redo Set For December 4th

Clarkston The Film / Facebook

Chris Buckley served in Iraq and Afghanistan before becoming an Imperial Nighthawk of the Northern Georgia Ku Klux Klan. He said he turned to drug addiction and a hate group when he returned home from overseas. His wife, Melissa, wanted him to leave the KKK. She did some researching and looked for ways to help her husband turn his life around. That's when she met former neo-Nazi skinhead, Arno Michaelis. 

  • Georgia Water Coalition Releases Report On Water Quality
  • Atlanta United Picks Up Last Second Win Over San Jose
  • Johnny Isakson Says New Music Legislation Will Help Artists In Georgia


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Republican nominee for governor Brian Kemp revealed a new $90 million school safety plan Wednesday.

At his Buckhead campaign headquarters, the secretary of state was joined by Republican nominee for lieutenant governor, Geoff Duncan, and their families to make the announcement.

The three-pronged platform focuses on creating dedicated support counselors in Georgia high schools, providing $30,000 in one-time funding for all Georgia’s public schools to address safety and restructuring the Department of Education to add a School Safety Division.

Mike Gonzalez / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia's Water Coalition released it's second "Clean 13" report Wednesday. The report highlights groups or people working to improve Georgia’s water quality.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, both Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams are focusing on education and school safety this week on the campaign trail. We’ll discuss the nuanced differences between each candidate’s proposals and how they plan to fund their efforts.

LaRaven Taylor

Millennials aren't as religious as generations before them. That's according to a report from the Pew Research Center. The study found 35 percent of Americans born between 1981 and 1996 are religiously unaffiliated. We gathered a group of church leaders to explain how they engage with young people. 

Boston Public Library / Flickr

In an episode of "Meet the Press" in April 1960, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said he thought it was one of the most "shameful tragedies of our nation that 11 o'clock on Sunday morning is one of the most segregated hours in Christian America."

Nearly 60 years later, a pair of church leaders in Macon observed that not much had changed. The New Georgia Encyclopedia states Macon is home to more churches than any other city in the American South.

GPB recorded a conversation between Rev. Dr. Jake Hall of Highland Hills Baptist Church and Rev. Dominique Johnson of Kingdom Life, Inc. for the series "Macon Conversations." In this excerpt, they discussed finding common ground between white people and people of color in their congregations.


Courtesy Anthony Batista

Five years ago, Jonathan Merritt moved from Buford to Brooklyn, New York. Almost immediately, Merritt found he couldn't communicate with the people around him. It was not that they spoke a different language, but rather that Southern Baptist preacher's son — and Emory-educated Master of Divinity — felt unable to have the conversations about faith and spirituality that he had always had in his hometown. Merritt set out to find out if other people in the United States were avoiding conversations about religion. In a survey of 1,000 people, he found that 1 in 5 had not had a conversation about religion in the last year. 


Ross Terrell / GPB News

SunTrust Park opened in the Spring of 2017. It doesn’t yet have two full seasons of Atlanta Braves baseball, but the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday released a fiscal impact study of the stadium and surrounding areas.


A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
(AP PHOTO/DAVID GOLDMAN)

Monday night, a federal judge denied a request to move Georgia’s 159 counties to paper ballots ahead of the Nov. 6 midterm election.

But she also denied the state’s request to dismiss the lawsuit, writing that Georgia’s 16-year-old touchscreen voting system is at risk of cyberattack or other threats.

GPB's Stephen Fowler has been following the case. He spoke with GPB's Rickey Bevington about what comes next.


GPB

Today, "On Second Thought" took a scan of the state.

We spoke with NPR political reporter Asma Khalid about low voter turnout, and heard from some of the Georgians she met in Houston, Cobb and Hancock counties.

GPB's own Emily Jones also joined from Savannah with a story about alligators in the Okefenokee swamp, and "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott munched on some edible bugs with University of Georgia entomologist Marianne Shockley.

We also caught up with John T. Edge of the Southern Foodways Alliance. His new series, "TrueSouth," debuts on SEC Network tonight. Chef Todd Richards also told us about his favorite Southern ingredient: collard greens. 

A new voting machine which prints a paper record sits on display at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Federal Judge Amy Totenberg denied a group’s request to require the state to switch to paper ballots. Georgia’s 27,000 electronic voting machines will remain in use for November’s election. But she said that Georgia's election officials have "buried their heads in the sand" on the issue of voting vulnerabilities.


Sean Powers / GPB

We launched a new "On Second Thought" series on Tuesday called “Main Ingredient” in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. Host Virginia Prescott heads into the kitchen with Atlanta-based chef and cookbook author, Todd Richards. He shares with us his love for collard greens.

"Bacon, Collard and Fried Egg Sandwich" by Todd Richards

SEC Network / Bluefoot Entertainment

Football and food are two mighty markers of Southern identity. The two intersect Tuesday night when John T. Edge and Wright Thompson's new series "TrueSouth," an exploration of Southern food and culture, debuts on SEC Network. In the first episode, Edge, who directs the Southern Foodways Alliance, goes to Birmingham, Alabama, where he meets generations of Greek-Americans who transformed their community. 


Paul Sableman / Flickr

With American politics more polarized than ever, most Americans have at least one thing in common going into midterms: they tend to stay home on Election Day. In fact, as NPR political reporter Asma Khalid has found, midterm elections have not drawn a majority of voters to the polls since the early 1900s. She set out to find out why.


atlantaga.gov

  • Judge Rules Against Paper Ballots For November Election
  • Vote On Gulch Redevelopment Tax Incentives Delayed
  • Coca Cola: "No Interest In Marijuana Or Cannabis"

AP

As Georgia's November midterm elections steadily approach, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB-Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.

This week, we examine the role of the Lieutenant Governor in Georgia, a seperate election from the nationally scrutinized Governor's race. 

WHENISCALENDARS.COM/GOOGLE IMAGES

Georgia will not have to move from its direct-recording electronic voting machines for this November’s elections.

In a Monday night ruling, U.S. District Court Judge Amy Totenberg denied a preliminary injunction that would have required more than 2,600 voting precincts in 159 counties to switch to an optically-scanned paper ballot system for the Nov. 6 election.

Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Senate Judiciary Committee might have to delay their vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh after sexual assault allegations have surfaced.


atlantaga.gov

  • Paper Ballot Decision Pending
  • Georgia Red Cross Volunteers Deploy For Florence Recovery
  • Parks & Trails Network Proposed Along Chattahoochee River

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