Atlanta History Center

AP Photo/David Goldman

Two years ago, far-right groups gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia, to oppose the city council's decision to remove a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a public park.

Those protests culminated in a "Unite The Right" rally, where members of Alt-Right, white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups clashed with counter-protestors ⁠— one of whom was killed. More than 49 people were injured. 


COURTESY YALE LAW SCHOOL/HENRY HOLT AND CO.

Eunice Hunton Carter was New York's first African-American assistant district attorney. The Atlanta native was the granddaughter of slaves, and now her grandson, Stephen Carter, is bringing her story to light. 

Invisible: The Forgotten Story of the Black Woman Lawyer Who Took Down America's Most Powerful Mobster tells the story of Eunice, the black woman and prosecutor who helped take down Charles "Lucky" Luciano. Eunice was born in Atlanta during a time when race riots were on the rise in the city. Her family eventually moved to Brooklyn in 1906. By 1936, Eunice found evidence linking organized crime to Luciano. On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott spoke with Eunice's grandson Stephen about his family's history. 


photo credit, Josh Luxenberg/Twitter

If asked about the "Plessy v. Ferguson" case, many Americans might connect the case to racial segregation. Far fewer would know the name Homer Plessy or what happened after he was arrested for refusing to leave a whites-only railway car in New Orleans the summer of 1892. 

Author and "Washington Post" editor Steve Luxenberg discovered the act of protest was decades in the making. Luxenberg joined "On Second Thought" and explained how Plessy, a fair-skinned man of African descent, was the perfect plant to challenge the constitutionality of separate rail cars in a case that made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896.


Jason Hales/ Atlanta History Center

When the panoramic painting known as the Battle of Atlanta Cyclorama opened in 1886 in Wisconsin, its Northern audience delighted in celebrating the North’s Civil War victory over the South.  

 

Most American adults had lived through the historic conflict stretching from 1861 and 1865.  

 

But after the cyclorama moved to Atlanta in 1892, both the canvas and the story of the battle were reshaped into a point of Southern pride. 

Courtesy Yale Law School/Henry Holt and Co.

Eunice Hunton Carter was New York's first African-American assistant district attorney. The Atlanta native was the granddaughter of slaves, and now her grandson, Stephen Carter, is bringing her story to light. 


American University

It’s been three years since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri. The chaos in Ferguson brought to light deeper and disturbing issues involved in policing African Americans. American University Law Professor Angela Davis has edited an anthology of essays about black men and boys who have died at the hands of police.

Jud McCraine

Georgia's Civil War legacy has been hotly debated over the years by everyone from historians to lawmakers to civil rights debaters. The Atlanta History Center developed online tools to help put Confederate monuments in historical perspective. Atlanta History Center president and CEO Sheffield Hale explains why he thinks there is a need for additional interpretation of these monuments.

 

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Jun 14, 2017

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center. We talk about Atlanta’s flimsy historic preservation record with Sheffield Hale, President of the Atlanta History Center; and Mtamanika Youngblood, President of Sweet Auburn Works.

Amazon.com

A hundred years ago, the United States entered into WWI. To mark the centennial, the Atlanta History Center is taking a closer look at Georgia’s connections to the conflict. Take the red poppy, now a ubiquitous symbol in times of war.

Commentary: Learn From Confederate Monuments, Don't Remove Them

Mar 9, 2016
Jud McCranie

Georgia's Civil War legacy has been hotly debated over the years. The Atlanta History Center has created online tools to help put Confederate monuments in historical perspective. In a commentary, the Center’s president and CEO Sheffield Hale says we should learn from Confederate memorials, not tear them down.