Atlanta Cyberattack

Atlanta Police Department

In March, hackers attacked Atlanta’s computer network. They held data hostage for a $51,000 ransom, which the city didn’t pay.

The group SamSam was identified in the ransom note. It’s known for choosing targets with weak security and high incentives to regain control of their information.


Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Atlanta’s mayor has asked for her entire cabinet to resign nearly 100 days into her first term. 

Monday morning, Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms asked more than two dozen department heads to hand in their resignations.

By the end of the week, she will decide who gets to stay, and who will move on.

The city’s Communications Director Anne Torres announced her resignation Monday, and Chief Operating Officer Dan Gordan stepped down last week.

AP Photo/David Goldman

 March 29, 4pm: 

The City of Atlanta is recovering slowly from a cyberattack that began March 22.  Some online customer services returned today, and Atlanta police officers are filing reports electronically again. The City says there's no indication the personal information of customers or employees was compromised. 

The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday. Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the $50,000 ransom hackers have demanded in exchange for the city to regain access to its data. Georgia Public Broadcasting reporter Emily Cureton updated us on the latest developments in the data breach. We also spoke with Milos Prvulovic, a professor in Georgia Tech's School of Computer Science.

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The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday.

Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Those behind the attack are demanding about $50,000 in exchange for the city to regain access to its data.

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the ransom. In the meantime Atlanta officials have resorted to filling out paperwork by hand. 

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The City of Atlanta’s computer network is still under siege by a ransomware cyberattack that began March 22. The shutdown is backlogging the city’s justice system. 

People who showed up for municipal court Monday morning were turned away and told their court dates would be automatically rescheduled.  Jackson McKay drove six hours from Ocala, Florida to get documents he needs for an auto dealer license.