Atlanta Airport

Donna Lowry | GPB

The House has passed a substitute to a controversial bill that would give the state control of Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

In the waning days of the 2019 legislative session, a "franken-bill" of several transportation priorities combined into one bill returns to the Senate after a vote of 104-70.

Lawmakers have only six legislative days left to debate and pass bills that could change policies all over the state. This week brought continued discussion about the potential Atlanta airport takeover and intense debate over women's reproductive rights. 

GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler joined "On Second Thought" to discuss this week in Georgia politics.


The Georgia General Assembly session begins on January 14, 2019.
Ken Lund / Creative Commons

By the end of crossover day, bills must be clear of one chamber or the other to remain in play for the rest of the legislative session. The state House and Senate passed a wave of legislation by the deadline, including a "heartbeat" abortion bill. GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler and Capitol correspondent for GPB TV's "Lawmakers," Donna Lowry, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss this week in Georgia politics.


Wikimedia Commons

The Georgia Senate has approved a measure that would move control of the world's busiest airport from the city of Atlanta to the state. 

SB 131, passed 34-22, would create the "Georgia Major Airport Authority" that would comprise elected officials and others appointed by the governor, lieutenant governor and House speaker. 

Nam Y. Huh / AP

O'Hare International Airport in Chicago was the busiest airport in the U.S. last year, surpassing Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport for the first time in four years.

The Federal Aviation Administration released data on Monday showing that O'Hare had more than 903,000 arrivals and departures during 2018. Atlanta's airport was second, with more than 895,000 arrivals and departures.

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.  

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.