Athens

Dekalb County CEO Michael Thurmond speaks during the I Will Vote Fundraising Gala Thursday, June 6, 2019, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with DeKalb County CEO and Georgia historian, Michael Thurmond. In his book Thurmond brings to light lesser known stories of African-American men and women in Athens, GA.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The University of Georgia continues to grapple with a difficult chapter of its history. It’s been under fire for how it handled the discovery of human remains under a school building during renovations. They appear to belong to people who were enslaved.

The growing tension recently erupted in protests. Demonstrators want reparations for descendants of slaves who built the university, including financial support for university staff and students as well as acknowledgment of the school’s history publicly and within the classroom.

GPB reporter Grant Blankenship went to Athens to witness the protests, and he talks with On Second Thought about what he found.


Brian Kemp waves after being sworn in as Georgia's governor during a ceremony at Georgia Tech's McCamish Pavilion, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
John Bazemore / AP Photos

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp is working on building a new healthcare waiver system. The governor has hired a firm to draw up plans in hopes of expanding Medicaid and giving a financial boost to private insurance buyers. How broad will the expansion program be and will there be a role for outside input before plans are finalized? 


Democratic activist Tom Steyer speaks during a "Need to Impeach" town hall event in Agawam, Mass. There has been rising disagreement among congressional Democrats over whether to pursue impeachment of President Donald Trump.
Steven Senne / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Rep. Lucy McBath from the 6th congressional district is being asked by constituents why she is not calling for the impeachment of President Trump. It is a question sure to play a role in Democratic Congressional races nationwide.


There's a building on the campus of the University of Georgia where the foundation rests on the bodies of enslaved people.

That's Baldwin Hall on UGA's picturesque North Campus. It's been years since more than 100 burials of enslaved people were discovered during an expansion of the building that houses the Anthropology Department. Since then, many on campus at UGA and in the larger Athens community have not been happy with the way UGA handled those remains.


Author and New York Times Columnist David Brooks speaking with Bill Nigut about his new book 'The Second Mountain.'
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, David Brooks is one of The New York Times most widely read and respected opinion writers. He’s a familiar presence on public television and radio and his books routinely become best sellers. So why did he wake up one morning and realize something vital was missing in his life? He decided he lacked purpose and connection and that we as a society were similarly afflicted.


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, the new head of the State Ethics Commission has launched a large-scale investigation of organizations led by Stacey Abrams. Ethics Chief, David Emadi says his probe is strictly non-partisan, but Democrats call it a blatant effort to undermine Abrams.


Emma Nigut

On this edition of Political Rewind, a federal judge has blocked the Mississippi abortion bill that closely resembles Georgia’s new “fetal heartbeat” measure. It is the latest judicial action halting new state laws that severely restrict abortion. What would this mean for Georgia’s new law?

 


In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with Grady Hospital President and CEO John Haupert on the many crises that public health institutions across the country continue to face.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, at their state convention this weekend, Georgia Republicans made it clear they’ll tie their 2020 destinies to President Trump and to the conservative politics Trump has championed.


Courtesy Max Ritter

Kishi Bashi made a name for himself with the shiny, fantastical indie pop of his first three albums. (The singer and multi-instrumentalist also made a pseudonym for himself: his stage name is a mashup of his first initial – K, for Kaoru – and last name, Ishibashi.) 

Ishibashi's newest record Omoiyari (available May 31) takes a more sober turn. From Japanese, "omoiyari" roughly translates as compassion or kindness shown toward others, which stirred in the Athens-based musician after President Trump's administration placed a travel ban on people from specific, predominantly Muslim countries.


On this edition of Political Rewind, we sit down with the state's new Lt. Gov., Geoff Duncan. Elected last November, he just completed his first session presiding over the state Senate.

 


Jim Beck, the commissioner of the Georgia Insurance Department, has been indicted in fraud case.
Jim Beck for Georgia

On this edition of Political Rewind, a federal grand jury has issued a 38-count indicitment against Georgia Insurance Commissioner Jim Beck. The former lobbyist is accused of commiting fraud. Lawyer's for Beck have said he does not plan to resign. We discuss how these proceedings move forward and what role the governor will play.

Bob Andres / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp makes good on a campaign promise. He has signed H.B. 481 into law. The measure all but outlaws abortion in Georgia.

 


GPB

Michael Owens, past chairman of the Cobb County Democrats and cyber security expert, announced his bid for U.S. House of Representatives Monday morning. Owens will be challenging incumbent Democratic Rep. David Scott. 

In his announcement, Owens said, "The next member of Congress for Georgia's 13th must be a progressive leader that will advocate for bold policies that will better the lives every American." 

University of Georgia Extension News

When people in Georgia talk about gnats, those conversations typically happen below the "gnat line" just south of Macon. But, this year, the annoying insects are showing up well north of there.

Months of heavy rain have increased water levels in Georgia’s rivers. That means an increase in larvae and more black flies, one of the many insects commonly referred to as a gnat.

Carolyn Meadows at the National Rifle Association's annual meeting of members in Indianapolis. Meadows was elected president of the NRA during a board meeting Monday, April 29, 2019.
Michael Conroy / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Democrats ponder their next steps in the effort to unseat David Perdue now that Stacey Abrams announces she won’t make the race.


Demonstrators protest the Food and Drug Administration's policies related to pharmaceutical opioids at a rally in front of the Health and Human Services headquarters in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the opioid crisis is a nationwide plague, killing or holding hostage to drug addiction countless Americans.


U.S. Rep. John Lewis will deliver the commencement address at Emory University's Oxford College.
Michael Dwyer / AP Photo

As spring comes to an end, graduation ceremonies quickly approach and commencement speakers are tasked with inspiring graduates as they enter the workforce. This year, Georgia’s colleges and universities will host notable speakers from across the nation, including Daymond John, Sally Yates, John Lewis, Andrew Young and Deborah Roberts.

Former Congressman John Barrow has annonuced a campaign for Georgia State Supreme Court.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia officials fear that a ruling by the Department of Justice could cost the state millions of dollars in lottery revenues and jeopardize funding for Hope Scholarships and pre-k programs.


John Amis / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp marks an early milestone in his tenure as the chief executive of the state, he’s been in office for 100 days. We take a look at what he’s accomplished so far and at controversies, he’s stirred up, too.


Gov. Brian Kemp and his wife Marty Kemp greet President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump as they arrive at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport to attend the "Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit," Wednesday, April 24, 2019, in Atlanta.
Evan Vucci / AP

Speaking at the National Rx Drug and Heroin Abuse Summit in Atlanta, President Donald Trump told attendees that his support for faith-based initiatives was critical for the effort to combat the opioid crisis. 


President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump arrive to speak at the "Rx Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit," Wednesday, April 24, 2019, in Atlanta.
Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump is in Atlanta today, speaking at a national conference on drug abuse. Our panel looks at how the Trump Administration has dealt with opioid abuse, which the president has called a national crisis.

 

 


U.S. Rep. Buddy Carter, a Republican who represents Georgia’s 1st Congressional District spoke at the 2019 Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta.
Robert Jimison / GPB

U.S. Congressman Earl "Buddy" Carter represents a large part of Georgia's coast. Some of the counties in his district are among the hardest hit in the state by the opioid crisis. Carter is also the only pharmacist currently serving in Congress. 


Courtesy of Neon

Long before Aretha Franklin became known as "The Queen of Soul," she was singing gospel in her father's church. A new documentary called "Amazing Grace" highlights the recording of her 1972 Grammy-Award winning album of the same name over two nights at a church in south Los Angeles. That footage has never been released publicly — until now. 

Alan Elliott directed the film and spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about the delays in releasing the documentary. Producer Tirrell Whittley also joined the conversation. 


Brian Kemp and Nathan Deal during a campaign rally.
John Amis / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, we look at criminal justice in Georgia.


Mary Frances Early UGA Black African-American Graduate
University of Georgia / Twitter

Mary Frances Early is a trailblazer. While Charlayne Hunter-Gault and Hamilton Holmes were the first African-Americans admitted to University of Georgia as undergrads in 1961, Early was the first to graduate. She earned a master's degree in music education.

Last week, UGA announced an initiative to name its College of Education after Early. Last year, when UGA was celebrating 100 years of education groundbreaking women, On Second Thought spoke with Early about her experiences as the first African-American student to graduate from the Georgia college. We hear that conversation.

UGA

Today on Political Rewind our Town Hall at the University of Georgia in Athens.


Ashley Rasys / University of Georgia

Geneticists at the University of Georgia have accomplished the first ever editing of the genes of a lizard with the gene editing tool CRISPR.  

 

The scientists weren’t shocked that the process worked, but they were surprised at the extent to which it was effective. That’s because the technique they were pursuing was a kind of work around for a peculiarity of reptile reproduction. 

 

 

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, in 2017 Doug Jones became the first Democrat elected to an Alabama U.S. Senate seat in more than two decades with the help of a massive turnout of African-American voters.

 


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