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This year marks 400 years since the transatlantic slave trade began. On Aug. 20, 1619, a ship carrying the first enslaved Africans to what became the United Stated arrived in Virginia, changing the course of American history.

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On this edition of Political Rewind, we come to you from Augusta.


Private Collection, Georgia Museum of Art

In the 1930s, the government created a package of programs to add new jobs to the faltering economy. One of them was the Works Progress Administration, which hired people to work on a wide variety of public service projects, including public art.

Many famous male artists that came to define American art, such as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, got their start through the WPA. But a new exhibit at the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens seeks to shed light on a number of female WPA artists.


St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office

Today on Political Rewind, as the debate over access to guns rages on, Georgia’s Republican lawmakers remain largely silent even as President Trump declares he’ll support new background check legislation.

On this edition of Political Rewind, the shockwaves reverberating from the massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio dominate the news headlines across the country and here in Georgia.

 


 

In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta. In two years, federal payments to hospitals treating a large share of the nation's poor will begin to evapor
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, an in-depth look at rural health care in Georgia.

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On this edition of Political Rewind, competing visions for creating a better future for Americans are being showcased in Atlanta this weekend.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, warning signs emerge that Gov. Brian Kemp’s plans for a partial expansion of Medicaid in Georgia may not win full support from the federal government and could cost far more than the state may be able to pay.

Alveda King, niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., along with religious leaders, from left, Rev. Bill Owens, Rev. Dean Nelson and Bishop Harry Jackson, speaks at the White House following a meeting with President Donald Trump.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the chorus of critics grow louder for what they say are President Trump’s racist pronouncements, hear why Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., says the criticisms are wrong.


Store surveillance video shows a confrotation between a state lawmaker and Publix shopper.
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On this edition of Political Rewind, allegations presented by Rep. Erica Thomas, as the victim of a racist taunt in a Cobb County supermarket, now appear to have unfolded differently than she described. What do the furiously partisan responses to the story tell us about the current political climate?


Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

The first launch is scheduled for late 2019 for one of two cube satellites made by the Small Satellite Research Laboratory at the University of Georgia.

Cube satellites, otherwise known as CubeSats, weigh less than three pounds and are approximately the size of a loaf of bread. Catching a ride on a rocket from a “launch provider,” each satellite plans to be in orbit between two and two and a half years.


In this June 19, 2013, file photo, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. When special counsel Mueller testifies before Congress it will be a moment many have been waiting for, but it comes with risk for Democrats.
J. Scott Applewhite, file / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Robert Mueller will give his highly anticipated testimony on Capitol Hill tomorrow. With four members on the House Judiciary Committee from Georgia, what roles will they play during the hearing? 


On Second Thought discusses the history of 152 Nassau Street, the site of some of county and blues music's earliest recordings, and why the building is at risk of demolition. The round table discussion is joined by Kyle Kessler, Atlanta architect and preservationist; Lance Ledbetter, co-director of Dust to Digital; Nedra Deadwyler, founder and CEO of Civil Bikes; and Steve Goodson, professor of history at University of West Georgia.


Residents in some Georgia neighborhoods are just starting to learn about the high concentrations of airborne toxins they breathe. Delve into an investigative piece from Brenda Goodman of WebMD and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.  Also, hear about The Georgia Environment Scan Report that sets the baseline for Georgia’s Medicaid waiver proposal. On Second Thought is joined by Ashli Owen-Smith, assistant professor of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences at Georgia State University.


Every day, millions of Americans use -and often rely on- GPS technology to help them navigate their commutes and get precise directions to their destinations. As Americans celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, they can thank the work of a Princeton University graduate, Todd Jaegar, who conceived and developed the Apollo 11 experiment that enabled GPS technology to take a “giant leap” forward.

Meet a hidden figure named Vicky Graves, who worked for NACA, the predecessor to NASA. 


DXR / Wikimedia Commons

The state’s economy has grown to be the ninth largest in the country. 

 

But not everyone in Georgia is enjoying economic prosperity.  

 

Take Athens-Clarke County, where 1 in 4 children live in poverty and over 28% of the population is poor. 

 

 


Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of UGA alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language. The co-founders and directors want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media.

Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


Christine Bernal

Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of University of Georgia alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language.

Hands In! co-founders and directors, Haley Beach and Amara Ede, want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media. Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


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On this edition of Political Rewind, Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry becomes the latest to announce his candidacy for U.S. Senate in 2020. 

Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., walks to the elevator for a meeting with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower, in New York. Casting a cloud over already tenuous negotiations, President Donald Trump said Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, that Deferred Action for Chi
AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File

Today on Political Rewind, the cash behind the campaigns. What do the fundraising numbers for candidates reveal about their support and how could the races in 2020 play out?

 


Migrants watch clashes with U.S. border agents, seen from Tijuana, Mexico.
Ramon Espinosa / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the immigration community takes a sigh of relief after President Donald Trump temporarily delayed plans to round up millions of undocumented immigrants across the country. What is next for Georgia’s immigrant community?

Album Cover Photo By Art Rosenbaum

"Corridos" are a traditional form of storytelling through song, which became widely popular during the Mexican Revolution. They often tell stories of history, oppression, the common human experience and cultural heroes. These songs chronicle life (and sometimes death) in an easily shared and consumed format.

A new album by Athens-based musician and activist Beto Cacao carries on the tradition of this musical form. It's called Undocorridos: Songs of the Stories and Struggles of the Undocumented in the USA


Dekalb County CEO Michael Thurmond speaks during the I Will Vote Fundraising Gala Thursday, June 6, 2019, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, a conversation with DeKalb County CEO and Georgia historian, Michael Thurmond. In his book Thurmond brings to light lesser known stories of African-American men and women in Athens, GA.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The University of Georgia continues to grapple with a difficult chapter of its history. It’s been under fire for how it handled the discovery of human remains under a school building during renovations. They appear to belong to people who were enslaved.

The growing tension recently erupted in protests. Demonstrators want reparations for descendants of slaves who built the university, including financial support for university staff and students as well as acknowledgment of the school’s history publicly and within the classroom.

GPB reporter Grant Blankenship went to Athens to witness the protests, and he talks with On Second Thought about what he found.


Brian Kemp waves after being sworn in as Georgia's governor during a ceremony at Georgia Tech's McCamish Pavilion, Monday, Jan. 14, 2019, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)
John Bazemore / AP Photos

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Brian Kemp is working on building a new healthcare waiver system. The governor has hired a firm to draw up plans in hopes of expanding Medicaid and giving a financial boost to private insurance buyers. How broad will the expansion program be and will there be a role for outside input before plans are finalized? 


Democratic activist Tom Steyer speaks during a "Need to Impeach" town hall event in Agawam, Mass. There has been rising disagreement among congressional Democrats over whether to pursue impeachment of President Donald Trump.
Steven Senne / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Rep. Lucy McBath from the 6th congressional district is being asked by constituents why she is not calling for the impeachment of President Trump. It is a question sure to play a role in Democratic Congressional races nationwide.


There's a building on the campus of the University of Georgia where the foundation rests on the bodies of enslaved people.

That's Baldwin Hall on UGA's picturesque North Campus. It's been years since more than 100 burials of enslaved people were discovered during an expansion of the building that houses the Anthropology Department. Since then, many on campus at UGA and in the larger Athens community have not been happy with the way UGA handled those remains.


Author and New York Times Columnist David Brooks speaking with Bill Nigut about his new book 'The Second Mountain.'
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On this edition of Political Rewind, David Brooks is one of The New York Times most widely read and respected opinion writers. He’s a familiar presence on public television and radio and his books routinely become best sellers. So why did he wake up one morning and realize something vital was missing in his life? He decided he lacked purpose and connection and that we as a society were similarly afflicted.


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On this edition of Political Rewind, the new head of the State Ethics Commission has launched a large-scale investigation of organizations led by Stacey Abrams. Ethics Chief, David Emadi says his probe is strictly non-partisan, but Democrats call it a blatant effort to undermine Abrams.


Emma Nigut

On this edition of Political Rewind, a federal judge has blocked the Mississippi abortion bill that closely resembles Georgia’s new “fetal heartbeat” measure. It is the latest judicial action halting new state laws that severely restrict abortion. What would this mean for Georgia’s new law?

 


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