Athens

Peter Frey / UGA

The University of Georgia's College of Education will be named next year to honor the school's first African American graduate. 

 

Mary Frances Early was the third black student to attend UGA, but she was the first to graduate, earning a master's degree in music education in 1962.

 

 


David Swanson / AP

NEW YORK (AP) — Jane Fonda was arrested at the U.S. Capitol on Friday while peacefully protesting climate change.

The actress and activist was handcuffed on the east side steps and escorted into a police vehicle. Video of the arrest circulated online.

Fonda was one of 16 people arrested for unlawfully protesting and was charged with "crowding, obstructing or incommoding." She was released hours later.

On Thursday, the actress vowed to join Friday protests at the Capitol "inspired and emboldened by the incredible movement our youth have created."

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is considering changes to the rules governing shark fishing.

Two deepwater species of sharks, the Ocean Whitetip and the Shortfin Mako, would receive greater protections under the proposal. Fishing for the Whitetip would be banned entirely while Makos that are harvested would need to be larger.


John Amis / AP

Former President Jimmy Carter fell Sunday at his home in Georgia and needed some stitches above his brow, but "feels fine," his spokeswoman said.

Deanna Congileo said in an email that the 39th president fell Sunday in Plains, Georgia, and received stitches. Carter turned 95 on Tuesday, becoming the first U.S. president to reach that milestone.

UGA COLLEGE OF AG & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES - OCCS

The University of Georgia has been seeking research proposals about the school's history regarding slavery.

University administrators say they're committing $100,000 for the effort.

A Cross Cut Of Georgia Concerts

Sep 30, 2019
Emily Jones / GPB

GPB Loves Music has been running the whole month of September. We’ve heard from bands big and small. We’ve learned about a variety of genres, from jazz to hip-hop to punk rock. We heard about Georgia’s music roots, and a law class based on music contracts. But we realized: something seemed to be missing.

One of the best and most crucial parts of loving music is seeing it live — the dimmed lights, the vibrations from the speakers, the collective feeling of people sharing a night out on the town.

So, instead of bringing musicians into the studio, we decided to go out. We sent three of our folks, in three different Georgia cities, to three different concerts, all on the same weekend.


Terrapin Beer

The Georgia Water Coalition is celebrating individuals and groups that are working to keep the state’s waterways clean with its annual “Clean 13” list. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Paul Van Wicklen drives a cherry picker in a library.

It’s actually a vault, and Van Wicklen is the vault manager. The cherry picker makes its way down an enormous aisle underneath the University of Georgia’s Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library. There are two other rooms just like it.


AP Photo/Gerry Broome

The dog area of an Athens, Georgia, animal shelter is under quarantine after three puppies tested positive for the highly contagious canine parvovirus.

News outlets report Athens-Clarke County Animal Shelter announced Wednesday that the area will be quarantined until Sept. 16.

Former candidate for Lieutenant Governor, Sarah Riggs Amico, has formally announced her run for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Sen. David Perdue
File, Stephen Fowler/GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, a new entry in the Democratic race for U.S. Senate. 

In this photo provided by U.S.People who've been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, Sunday, June 17, 2018.
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Trump administration issues new rules designed to further reduce the number of immigrants seeking new lives in the United States.

Wiki Commons

This year marks 400 years since the transatlantic slave trade began. On Aug. 20, 1619, a ship carrying the first enslaved Africans to what became the United Stated arrived in Virginia, changing the course of American history.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, we come to you from Augusta.


Private Collection, Georgia Museum of Art

In the 1930s, the government created a package of programs to add new jobs to the faltering economy. One of them was the Works Progress Administration, which hired people to work on a wide variety of public service projects, including public art.

Many famous male artists that came to define American art, such as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, got their start through the WPA. But a new exhibit at the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens seeks to shed light on a number of female WPA artists.


St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office

Today on Political Rewind, as the debate over access to guns rages on, Georgia’s Republican lawmakers remain largely silent even as President Trump declares he’ll support new background check legislation.

On this edition of Political Rewind, the shockwaves reverberating from the massacres in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio dominate the news headlines across the country and here in Georgia.

 


 

In this Friday, Jan. 24, 2014 photo, a worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital, in Atlanta. In two years, federal payments to hospitals treating a large share of the nation's poor will begin to evapor
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, an in-depth look at rural health care in Georgia.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, competing visions for creating a better future for Americans are being showcased in Atlanta this weekend.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, warning signs emerge that Gov. Brian Kemp’s plans for a partial expansion of Medicaid in Georgia may not win full support from the federal government and could cost far more than the state may be able to pay.

Alveda King, niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., along with religious leaders, from left, Rev. Bill Owens, Rev. Dean Nelson and Bishop Harry Jackson, speaks at the White House following a meeting with President Donald Trump.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the chorus of critics grow louder for what they say are President Trump’s racist pronouncements, hear why Alveda King, the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., says the criticisms are wrong.


Store surveillance video shows a confrotation between a state lawmaker and Publix shopper.
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, allegations presented by Rep. Erica Thomas, as the victim of a racist taunt in a Cobb County supermarket, now appear to have unfolded differently than she described. What do the furiously partisan responses to the story tell us about the current political climate?


Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

The first launch is scheduled for late 2019 for one of two cube satellites made by the Small Satellite Research Laboratory at the University of Georgia.

Cube satellites, otherwise known as CubeSats, weigh less than three pounds and are approximately the size of a loaf of bread. Catching a ride on a rocket from a “launch provider,” each satellite plans to be in orbit between two and two and a half years.


In this June 19, 2013, file photo, then-FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. When special counsel Mueller testifies before Congress it will be a moment many have been waiting for, but it comes with risk for Democrats.
J. Scott Applewhite, file / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Robert Mueller will give his highly anticipated testimony on Capitol Hill tomorrow. With four members on the House Judiciary Committee from Georgia, what roles will they play during the hearing? 


On Second Thought discusses the history of 152 Nassau Street, the site of some of county and blues music's earliest recordings, and why the building is at risk of demolition. The round table discussion is joined by Kyle Kessler, Atlanta architect and preservationist; Lance Ledbetter, co-director of Dust to Digital; Nedra Deadwyler, founder and CEO of Civil Bikes; and Steve Goodson, professor of history at University of West Georgia.


Residents in some Georgia neighborhoods are just starting to learn about the high concentrations of airborne toxins they breathe. Delve into an investigative piece from Brenda Goodman of WebMD and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.  Also, hear about The Georgia Environment Scan Report that sets the baseline for Georgia’s Medicaid waiver proposal. On Second Thought is joined by Ashli Owen-Smith, assistant professor of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences at Georgia State University.


Every day, millions of Americans use -and often rely on- GPS technology to help them navigate their commutes and get precise directions to their destinations. As Americans celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, they can thank the work of a Princeton University graduate, Todd Jaegar, who conceived and developed the Apollo 11 experiment that enabled GPS technology to take a “giant leap” forward.

Meet a hidden figure named Vicky Graves, who worked for NACA, the predecessor to NASA. 


DXR / Wikimedia Commons

The state’s economy has grown to be the ninth largest in the country. 

 

But not everyone in Georgia is enjoying economic prosperity.  

 

Take Athens-Clarke County, where 1 in 4 children live in poverty and over 28% of the population is poor. 

 

 


Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of UGA alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language. The co-founders and directors want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media.

Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


Christine Bernal

Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of University of Georgia alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language.

Hands In! co-founders and directors, Haley Beach and Amara Ede, want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media. Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Clarkston Mayor Ted Terry becomes the latest to announce his candidacy for U.S. Senate in 2020. 

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