arts

© Maira Kalman, courtesy of Julie Saul Gallery, New York.

Maira Kalman is perhaps best known by adults for the now iconic "New Yorkistan" and other covers for The New Yorker, or a dozen books including And the Pursuit of Happiness and The Principles of Uncertainty. Kids, on the other hand, know her better for the 18 picture books she's written and illustrated.

Kalman's picture books for children are the inspiration for an exhibition opening this week at the High Museum of Art. It's called The Pursuit of Everything. One of her books, Max Makes a Millionis also being adapted for the stage. Kalman is in town for the play's world premiere at the Alliance Theatre and the exhibition's opening this weekend, but first, she joined On Second Thought from New York.


Courtesy of The Goat Farm Arts Center

Tucked away down a quiet street, not far from Howell Mill Road on Atlanta's Westside, you'll find the Goat Farm Arts Center. It's a compound of artist studios, residences, and performance and event spaces. While there are some goats, it's long been a community where artists can live, exchange ideas, and get projects off the ground.

The Goat Farm recently announced a $250 million transformation. Anthony Harper, founder and co-owner of the arts compound, joined On Second Thought to explain how this will allow them to both preserve most of the existing structures on the property while expanding the facilities and scope of their programs. He also discussed what they hope this will achieve for Georgia's arts community.


Courtesy Daniel Parvis

Most Americans say they know at least some of their neighbors, but admit they tend to interact less with neighbors who don't belong to the same class, race or political party, according to the Pew Research Center. So, when Tania del Valle and her husband Pablo move into the fixer-upper next door to Frank and Virginia Butley's historic home, a saga of microaggressions ensues.

Those racial, generational and economic tensions play out in Native Gardens, on stage this month at Lawrenceville's Aurora Theatre. Costars Fedra Ramirez-Olivares and Carolyn Cook, who portray Tania del Valle and Virginia Butley, respectively, joined On Second Thought in studio to share more about their production and the play's real-life parallels in Gwinnett County. 


Courtesy YouTube

Jackie K. Cooper is a retiree who's practiced law, served in the U.S. Air Force and written seven books. The 77-year-old can now add another title to his enviable resume: YouTube sensation. Cooper has reviewed movies, books and television shows on his YouTube page for the past 12 years.

He joined On Second Thought on the line from Perry, Georgia, to explain how he went from 136 to 150,000 subscribers in less than one month on YouTube. 


GPB

Creative industries are booming in Georgia. Film, television, music and art and digital entertainment pumped $62.5 billion and 200,000 jobs into the economy in 2017. That's according to Georgia's Economic Development and Council For The Arts.


Underground Atlanta Developer Holds Community Feedback Meeting

Jul 13, 2017
wikipedia.org

 

On Thursday, the developers hoping to breathe new life into Underground Atlanta held their first community meeting since purchasing the property.

Steve Howe is Chief Operating Officer with WRS, the real estate company that owns the site. He’s looking to turn the 12 acres in the heart of downtown Atlanta into a residential and commercial destination.

“We want to bring people that will live here, so that they can eat here, they can work here, and just really truly activate this part of town that is not as active as it really should be,” he said.

Fahamu Pecou

In metro Atlanta, art is all around us.

We asked some of the city's creative minds to share their perspectives about the Atlanta art scene, why they work in their particular medium and the value of public art.

Check out a slideshow of their favorite works above, and listen to what they had to say below.

Emily Jones / GPB News

The Savannah City Council on Thursday walked back from a plan to cut about $400,000 in funding for social service and arts organizations.

 

The move came after supporters of the groups facing cuts packed the council meeting to voice their concerns.

 

Many speakers argued against reducing arts funding to put more money toward public safety, a reason often cited for the cuts proposed in the 2017 city budget.