art

Private Collection, Georgia Museum of Art

In the 1930s, the government created a package of programs to add new jobs to the faltering economy. One of them was the Works Progress Administration, which hired people to work on a wide variety of public service projects, including public art.

Many famous male artists that came to define American art, such as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, got their start through the WPA. But a new exhibit at the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens seeks to shed light on a number of female WPA artists.


Mary Beth Meehan

If art is supposed to start conversations, then “Seeing Newnan” is working. The project mounted 19 large-scale photographs of residents on buildings around Newnan, Georgia.

Artist Mary Beth Meehan’s large-scale photographs of residents in Newnan have exposed the shifting demographics of the town. A resident, who protested the image of two Muslim schoolgirls in the town square, got more than a thousand responses from others who embrace a more inclusive vision of the town.


David Kaminsky

Suzanne Jackson has lived a creative life. She's known for her visual art - but is also a poet, dancer, writer, radio host and has a master's in theatrical set design from Yale University.

 

Telfair Museums in Savannah is revealing a 50-year retrospective of Jackson's work. It's called, "Suzanne Jackson: Five Decades." The exhibition will begin showing this Friday. Jackson spoke with On Second Thought about her life, work and how art has always been a part of it all.

 

In Search Of Flannery O'Connor's Peacocks

Jun 25, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

Once you turn onto the dirt road leading up to Andalusia, it’s easy to forget that you’re in a college town and not a rural 1950s farmland.

Flannery O’Connor’s historic home appears almost exactly as it did when she lived in Milledgeville, with a notable exception: the writer’s famous aviary, which once housed more than 40 peacocks, has been whittled down to just two of the colorful birds and moved to the opposite end of the backyard.

This month, researchers broke ground on an archaeological dig at Andalusia, hoping to find the exact location of O’Connor’s peacock pens.


Courtesy of The Goat Farm Arts Center

Tucked away down a quiet street, not far from Howell Mill Road on Atlanta's Westside, you'll find the Goat Farm Arts Center. It's a compound of artist studios, residences, and performance and event spaces. While there are some goats, it's long been a community where artists can live, exchange ideas, and get projects off the ground.

The Goat Farm recently announced a $250 million transformation. Anthony Harper, founder and co-owner of the arts compound, joined On Second Thought to explain how this will allow them to both preserve most of the existing structures on the property while expanding the facilities and scope of their programs. He also discussed what they hope this will achieve for Georgia's arts community.


An estimated one million people thronged to Atlanta for the 2019 Super Bowl. When the opposing teams and visiting fans returned home, a series of murals depicting Atlanta's civil rights and social justice journey stayed behind. 

Among the 11 artists who painted murals for the WonderRoot "Off The Wall" initiative surrounding the big game is renowned artist Gilbert Young. His iconic, 40-year old image, "He Ain't Heavy" is now installed in huge scale on the side of Capitol Gateway Apartments in Atlanta. 

Courtesy of Gilbert Young/Facebook

An estimated one million people thronged to Atlanta for the 2019 Super Bowl. When the opposing teams and visiting fans returned home, a series of murals depicting Atlanta's civil rights and social justice journey stayed behind. 

Among the 11 artists who painted murals for the WonderRoot "Off The Wall" initiative surrounding the big game is renowned artist Gilbert Young. His iconic, 40-year old image "He Ain't Heavy" is now installed in huge scale on the side of Capitol Gateway Apartments in Atlanta. 


As peak tornado season bears down on the Southeast, On Second Thought is looking at who gets aid after disasters. A recent NPR investigation found that federal emergency has been a political football played by both parties. Research from Carnegie Mellon and other sources shows that how much people affected by disasters get depennds on how your district votes.

Robert Benincasa is a producer for NPR Investigations. He researched and reported on the thousands of disaster buyouts Federal Emergency Management Agency or FEMA didn't want people to see.


Courtesy of Cherry Blossom Festival, Macon

"On Second Thought" kicked off the first day of spring with a preview of events happening around Georgia.

Theater critic and Arts ATL contributor Kelundra Smith shared her picks for seasonal shows, festivals and events. 


Photo Credit: Jon Snyder

Everyone knows what a magazine looks like on the coffee table or nightstand, but have you ever seen one performed on a stage? Monday night a group of artists and journalists performs Pop-Up Magazine at Atlanta's Variety Playhouse.

The event is described as a combination of a podcast, documentary film, concert, play, comedy show and more. Aaron Edwards, senior story producer and co-host of Pop-Up Magazine, joined "On Second Thought" to explain what the audience can expect to see and how it all came together. We also hear from Atlanta native Josie Duffy Rice, senior reporter for "The Appeal," who is a contributor for the onstage performance.

Yehimi Cambrón, WonderRoot

Dozens of murals celebrating Atlanta’s social justice history are going up before the Super Bowl.

It's part of an intitiative called "Off The Wall" that curated 11 artists to paint the murals around the city.

Courtesy Kemi Griffen Photography

Sit-ins, marches and rallies often come to mind when people think of activism. Atlanta choreographer and dancer Raianna Brown has another spin on it. In 2016, she gained attention online for kneeling during a college football game. Back then, she was a 22-year old member of the Goldrush dance team at Georgia Institute of Technology.

 

Now, Brown is continuing her advocacy with movement. She visited “On Second Thought” to talk about her new dance production, “Skid.” It’s a celebration of the vulnerability and strength of humanity. Komansé Dance Theater takes a look at homelessness and gentrification in the metro Atlanta area and beyond. 

 


Ross Terrell/GPB

Super Bowl 53 gets underway in less than one month. The action will take place at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta on February 3. Before the game and entertainment, the Super Bowl committee and the arts advocacy group, WonderRoot, are collaborating on murals to highlight the city’s civil rights and social justice legacy. The Off the Wall project seeks to elevate key stories from Atlanta’s pursuit of civil and human rights. Eleven muralists were chosen to create designs based on community conversations.

GPB’s Ross Terrell and WonderRoot executive director Chris Appleton joined “On Second Thought” to discuss the Off the Wall initiative.


Some rural Georgia schools will benefit from an infusion of grant money for art education. Twenty-six rural school districts, mostly located south of metro Atlanta, will split $260,000 in grant money.

 

 

La'Raven Taylor

If you're looking to take a break away from holiday shopping, several holiday events in and around Atlanta are attracting friends and families from all over. 

"On Second Thought" invited theater critic and Arts ATL contributor Kelundra Smith to give her picks of holiday performances and shows. Floyd Hall also joined the conversation from Miami, where he's wrapping up work from the 2018 Art Basel show. Hall is also an Arts ATL contributor and co-host of Blklanta podcast. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

When his sons were still in school, Macon artist Charvis Harrell says he was always frustrated by the lack of Black history in their history classes.  

 

“You know, it's just pick cotton and Martin Luther King,” Harrell said. “In between that time nothing else ever happened, you know?” 

 

Which Harrell knew wasn't true. So he made art inspired by overlooked history to keep around the house. The idea was to get his sons thinking, talking and questioning. 

 

In his show “Monuments For Heroes Which Have None” at the Mill Hill Community Center in Macon, Harrell does the same thing for the rest of us. 

 

 

Today we discussed the importance of community input in health issues and art museums.

We spoke with Breana Lipscomb, the U.S. maternal health campaign manager for The Center for Reproductive Rights. The organization works to improve health outcomes for women. We also spoke with Wanda Irving, a consultant and mediator, whose daughter died after giving birth in 2017.

We also spoke to Kevin W. Tucker, chief curator at the High Museum of Art about the re-installation and the museum's efforts to be representative, accessible and inclusive to the community. Floyd Hall, ArtsATL contributor, joined the conversation and discussed similar efforts to embrace diversity through the arts around Atlanta.

 


High Museum of Art / Twitter

Atlanta's High Museum of Art looked to the community for inspiration for the re-installation of its collection. The recent rotation of artwork more closely reflects Atlanta's demographics. It features more art by women and people of color.

 

This re-installation is part of the museum's effort to make their environment truly representative, accessible and inclusive.

 

We spoke to Kevin W. Tucker, chief curator at the High Museum of Art about the re-installation and to Floyd Hall, ArtsATL contributor, about similar efforts to embrace diversity through the arts around Atlanta.

 


We spoke with trailblazing artists and explored Georgia's revitalized oyster market on today's show.

Richard Hunt's public art can be seen in places like Augusta's Springfield Park. His abstract sculptures helped redefine shared spaces since his start in the 1950s. "Richard Hunt: Synthesis" is a new exhibit opening at the Georgia Museum of Art honoring Hunt's prolific career. We spoke with Hunt and Shawnya Harris, the exhibit's curator.


Richard Hunt Sculpture Augusta Art Artwork
Richard Hunt

The downtown branch of the Atlanta Public Library and Augusta's Springfield Park are both home to Richard Hunt's sculptures. Hunt changed the look of public art since his start in the 1950s.

 

The Chicago-based artist's work will be on display at the Georgia Museum of Art beginning this Saturday. The exhibit is called "Richard Hunt: Synthesis." We spoke with Hunt and Shawnya Harris, the exhibit's curator.

 


Art Georgia Gallery
Jessica Caldas

Some survivors of sexual assault have chosen to tell their stories through creative mediums. Jessica Caldas is an Atlanta-based artist and activist who tells women’s stories through her artwork. She wants her art to create space for her audience to have difficult conversations about trauma and healing.

We spoke with Caldas about the role of art in processing her own sexual assault.

Allyssa Lewis Talks About Her Animated Life

May 24, 2018
La'Raven Taylor / GPB

Fans of anime, gaming and comics: Prepare to geek out at this year’s Momocon in Atlanta.

 

It’s one of the fastest growing all-ages conventions in the country, with more than 90,000 visitors expected this year.

Young Singer Finds Comfort In Opera

Jun 28, 2017
Katie Atkinson / GPB

 

 

How many sixteen year old opera singers do you know? Well, add Leah Duval to the list.

Duval is a student at Howard High School in Macon who just wrapped up her third year at the annual Otis Redding Music Camp. She may be a veteran camper, but opera is new to her.

Souls Grown Deep Foundation
Stephen Pitkin/Pitkin Studio

The High Museum of Art recently received 54 works made by contemporary African-American artists from the South as part of a gift/purchase from Souls Grown Deep Foundation. This gift will debut in 2018 as part of the museum’s permanent collection reinstallation. We talk with curator Katherine Jentleson about one incoming piece by artist Thornton Dial.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

When Kathryn Mayo decided to pursue an art project in her hometown of Selma Alabama, she was afraid she might not speak the language anymore.

 

“One of the things that's happened since I've moved to California is that I've lost a lot of my accent,” Mayo said.

 

Matt Terrell

If you live in the South, you are more likely to be diagnosed with HIV.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says one in 51 Georgians will contract the virus in their lifetime.

Atlanta is considered to have a "concentrated HIV epidemic," largely due to poverty and high-risk behaviors such as injectable drug use.

A new public art exhibition opening Valentine's Day at Centennial Olympic Park illustrates Atlanta's growing HIV infection rate.

It's called "Atlanta's HIV+ Population Now."

Photo Rickey Bevington

Southwest Georgia’s phantasmagorical homestead known as Pasaquan opens to the public Saturday after a two-year, multi-million dollar restoration.

The seven acre site is the life’s work of eccentric artist Eddie Owens Martin.

Pasaquan is hard to describe. You pull off a flat, tree-lined road down a gravel driveway and the first thing you see is a tall pagoda and long, high wall covered with brightly colored designs.

“Dope,” is the first reaction from University of Georgia art graduate student Katherine Miller.

© Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth captures larger-than-life photographs that take people places they don't normally get to see – like space stations and physics laboratories. His images often focuses on technology and man-made landscapes and he encourages viewers to see the world differently.

Do Southern Artists Get Enough Respect?

Aug 24, 2016
Creative Commons

Paris and New York are considered capitals of the art world, but why not Atlanta? Artists from the South have never received the same level of acclaim as their counterparts in other parts of the U.S. and the world. Starting Saturday, the Atlanta Biennial returns after a nine-year hiatus to shine a spotlight on Southern artists.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Every 107 seconds from now, someone will be sexually assaulted in the U.S, according to federal data analyzed by the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network. Atlanta artist Jessica Caldas is getting beyond the numbers and statistics by taking to the city's streets with a piece of chalk and an important message. She marks the ground with an X every 107 seconds to represent those affected by sexual violence.

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