Architecture

In 1832, playwright and peformer Thomas Dartmouth Rice used theatrical make-up to create a supposedly black character. The character's name was Jim Crow. That name later came to represent a system of extra-judicial terror and racial segregation laws that ended in 1965, but the recent political crisis in Virginia shows dressing up in blackface did not.

A poll published by "The Washington Post" has Virginians split over whether Gov. Ralph Northam should resign after a photo from his 1984 Medical School yearbook surfaced. It shows a character in blackface next to a person wearing a Ku Klux Klan hood. Last week, a Pew Research Center poll found about 34 percent of all Americans say, "Dressing up in blackface is always or sometimes acceptable for a Halloween costume." 

 


Creative Commons / MaxPixel

Without Atlanta legend John Portman, you might never walk into a hotel lobby with a cavernous atrium, an office tower with stacked balconies or a shopping center with transparent elevators whizzing up and down.

Portman revolutionized architecture, turning buildings inward to jaw-dropping effect. To quote his close friend, Ambassador Andrew Young, "Everybody became a country bumpkin when they walked into the Hyatt. You had to say, 'Oh my god, what is this?'"


Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

Let's Face It, Atlanta Has A Teardown Culture

Jun 14, 2017
wallyg / Foter

A recent study finds Atlanta lags behind nearly every large city in the country when it comes to preserving historic architecture. A 1922 building in Vine City was recently slated for teardown, only to be partially saved as a YMCA center.

Ethiel Garlington, executive director of Historic Macon, talks with Josephine Bennett of GPB Macon about what projects the preservation group will take on in 2017.   

Mary Ann Sullivan, Bluffton College

Rickey Bevington looks at the most interesting debates about life in the South’s most prominent city. She is the Atlanta host for NPR's nationally syndicated "All Things Considered" weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m on 88.5 FM.

Should Atlanta's Central Library be saved?

That’s the question before the Atlanta City Council and the Fulton County Commission debating the future of downtown’s Central Library.