American South

Courtesy of the High Museum of Art

"There is no exquisite beauty...without some strangeness in the proportion."

That's a line from Edgar Allan Poe, the king of the dark and eerie, the strange and surreal. It could also describe the appeal of an exhibition currently on view at the High Museum of Art, called "Strange Light: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin."


From the Civil War to the Dust Bowl and from baseball to jazz, Ken Burns documentaries have covered a range of critical events in American history and culture. Now, country music is getting the Ken Burns treatment. 

He and long-time collaborators and producers Dayton Duncan and Julie Dunfey spent eight years researching and making an eight-part, 16-hour documentary called Country Music, which will air in six parts beginning Sunday, Sept. 15 on GPB.


Courtesy of the High Museum of Art

"There is no exquisite beauty...without some strangeness in the proportion."

That's a line from Edgar Allan Poe, the king of the dark and eerie, the strange and surreal. It could also describe the appeal of an exhibition currently on view at the High Museum of Art, called "Strange Light: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin."

Laughlin has been called "Edgar Allan Poe with a camera." He was a Louisiana native and Southern photographer known as the "Father of American Surrealism." A fascinating and irascible character, Laughlin broke boundaries with photographic innovations that linked imagery to the subconscious. 


Courtesy of Sony Music Archives

From the Civil War to the Dust Bowl and from baseball to jazz, Ken Burns documentaries have covered a range of critical events in American history and culture. Now, country music is getting the Ken Burns treatment. 

 

He and long-time collaborators and producers Dayton Duncan and Julie Dunfey spent eight years researching and making an eight-part, 16-hour documentary called Country Music, which will air on PBS stations like GPB in September. GPB is a presenting partner for a preview April 1 at the Atlanta History Center and on Wednesday, April 10, at Savannah's Jepson Center.

 

 


Snowden Wright

Author Snowden Wright is no stranger to a good Southern epic. His new novel, "American Pop," chronicles the fizzy and flat years of a cola empire and the family who built it. The novel pours out American cultural and economic history while wrestling with ideas of legacy and nostalgia.

Wright joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the novel's release on Feb. 5. He shared his experiences growing up in Mississippi and writing the novel inside of his family's old shotgun cottage.


Digital Library of Georgia

Georgia newspapers spanning the years from the end of the colonial period to the start of the Civil War have been made publicly available via the internet.


Joe H. Shipp

The Bitter Southerner recently published its first hardcover book. "A Community in Black & White: A Most Unusual Photo Album of One Southern Community" is a collection of photographs Joe Hardy Shipp took of Hickman County, Tennessee, over several decades in the mid-twentieth century.

 

His grandson, Joseph Shipp, discovered the collection, which includes thousands of black and white photographs of both black and white members of the Hickman County community. The unusual part? These photos were taken at the height of Jim Crow when white-owned businesses only served white customers. 


Courtesy Wildsam

"Wildsam" is not your typical travel guide. Created by LaGrange, Georgia, native Taylor Bruce, the highly-designed, pocket-sized Wildsam Field Guide has no starred ratings or glossy photos. Described as existing between a magazine and a guidebook, each Wildsam is instead filled with illustrations and longform essays, interviews with locals and essential knowledge about a place's history as well as critical issues it faces today. The aim, Bruce said, is to give travelers a true sense of place, regardless of where they're from or where they're going. This time, Wildsam is sending travelers across the American South with its newest Road Trip guide.