American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society

The latest data from the American Cancer Society indicate breast cancer is now the most common cause of cancer death for African American women in Georgia even though breast cancer deaths overall have been declining.


New data from the American Cancer Society show breast cancer as the number one form of cancer-related death for African American women in Georgia. Principal scientist from the American Caner Society, Carol Desantis, and director of cancer health equity at Morehouse School of Medicine, Dr. Brian Rivers, delve into the reality behind the numbers.


Everyone knows what a magazine looks like on the coffee table or nightstand, but have you ever seen one performed on a stage? Monday night a group of artists and journalists performs Pop-Up Magazine at Atlanta's Variety Playhouse.

The event is described as a combination of a podcast, documentary film, concert, play, comedy show and more. Aaron Edwards, senior story producer and co-host of Pop-Up Magazine, joined "On Second Thought" to explain what the audience can expect to see and how it all came together. We also hear from Atlanta native Josie Duffy Rice, senior reporter for "The Appeal," who is a contributor for the onstage performance.

 


Courtesy of Susan G. Komen Greater Atlanta

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among Georgia women. The good news is more than half of deaths linked to the disease were prevented in the U.S. over the past three decades; however, there's a big racial gap in Georgia. African-American women are more likely to die from breast cancer than non-hispanic white women. The American Cancer Society released these findings.

Carol DeSantis is the lead author of the study and spoke with "On Second Thought" with the latest statistics. Janice McKenzie-Crayton also joined the conversation. McKenzie-Crayton is a three-time breast cancer survivor and chair of Komen Atlanta's Sisters of Promise.


For Mark Sanchez, being a peach grower means "you pretty much stay worried all year. That's because for peaches to bloom in the spring, peach trees have to stay cold in the winter. At Lane Southern Orchards in Fort Valley, Georgia, that means getting 650-850 "chill hours" — or hours under 45 degrees Fahrenheit — between November and February. But last year, conditions didn't even come within range. By Sanchez's estimate, Fort Valley only got about 550 cold hours. Whereas a typical peach season goes through mid-August, Lane wrapped up operations in early July. So after this year's cold winter, Sanchez, Lane's CEO, is more optimistic. We talked to him about what we can expect from this year's peach season and what makes Georgia the peach state even though other states have surpassed our production levels. 

James Palinsad / Flickr

A new study from the Breast Cancer Research Foundation finds disparities in breast cancer outcomes among African-American women compared to white women.

 

This follows a 2016 Cancer Epidemiology study that found that of any U.S. city, Atlanta had the widest gap in breast cancer mortality rates between African-American women and white women. That’s with 44 black patients per 100,000 residents dying, compared to 20 per 100,000 white women.