African-American literature

Julie Markes / Associated Press

The '90s sitcom, "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," ran for six seasons and launched Will Smith as a cultural icon. The show followed Smith as a fictionalized version of himself as he moved from Philadelphia to live with his aunt and uncle in the wealthy neighborhood of Bel-Air in Los Angeles.

An upcoming book series reimagines the story with a new character, a fresh princess named Destiny. Author Denene Millner is writing "The Fresh Princess" series and joined "On Second Thought" to discuss her work as an author.

Zora Neale Hurston, the celebrated Harlem Renaissance writer and anthropologist, has a new bestseller out nearly 60 years after her death. She wrote "Barracoon: The Story of The Last 'Black Cargo'" almost a century ago. It’s the nonfiction story of Oluale Kossola, the last survivor of the African slave trade in the United States. Kossola was sold into slavery and taken from West Africa when he was 19.


Rosa Duffy / ForKeepsBooks Instagram

For Keeps, a shop for rare and classic black books, recently opened on Auburn Avenue in Atlanta. Owner Rosa Duffy wants to make the shop a community space to explore the history of black literature and publishing.

"Atlanta already has a sense of appreciation for their blackness. We already have a huge community here," said Duffy. "So I feel very humbled and honored to be on Auburn Avenue, which has such a history behind it."

She stopped by "On Second Thought" to discuss her parents' influence on her reading and the process of opening a used bookstore in the city.