Adrian Miller

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

All this year, we have raised a glass to Southern food. From sweet tea to fried chicken, every Southern dish tells a story. Southern food scholar Adrian Miller and Ashli Stokes of the Center for the Study of the New South helped us dig into the history of mac and cheese, and how the creamy dish helps us understand Southern identity. 

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Since the outset of the American presidency, African-Americans have worked in the White House kitchen, but they’re often left out of the history books. We talked with food historian Adrian Miller, author of the book, "The President’s Kitchen Cabinet: The Stories of African-Americans Who Fed Our First Families, From the Washingtons to the Obamas."

Hurricane Harvey displaced tens of thousands of people and destroyed tens of thousands of homes across the Southeast. Even though the storm has passed, there’s a long road to recovery. Georgia-based MAP International is one of the relief organizations helping the storm’s victims. We check in with the group’s CEO, Steve Stirling.

The history of Southern food is as rich as its flavors. Whether it's red beans and rice, fried chicken, biscuits or potlikker, the history of our region’s fare stretches far and wide – from slave plantations, to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and into our kitchens today. 

University of Georgia Press

Food is an integral part of the South’s identity, and all this year, we’re paying homage to Southern cuisine. It’s a series we call Georgia Eats. A lot of chefs and food writers know the name Mrs. S.R. Dull. In 1928, she wrote the book "Southern Cooking," which has been described as the "bible" of Southern cooking. That got us thinking if there are any other cookbooks that rise to that level.