ACLU

The empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia has filed a lawsuit asking the federal court to block implementation of the state’s restrictive new abortion law.  ACLU Director Andrea Young joins us to discuss the basis for the suit.


David Goldman / AP

The American Civil Liberties Union says a Georgia sheriff is violating the rights of inmates at a county jail by prohibiting them from receiving outside books and magazines.

The ACLU sent a letter Wednesday to Chatham County Sheriff John Wilcher asking him to rescind a policy that inmates may not receive books or magazines by mail or from visitors. The policy says inmates must choose reading materials from book carts managed by jail staff.

(AP Photo/Jaime Henry-White)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as qualifying continues for the 2018 Georgia elections, the 6th District Congressional Race draws a surprise Democratic candidate.  The race may now become a referendum on gun control.  At the State Capitol, time is running out for Cobb County leaders to decide whether they want to join a highly-touted regional transit funding plan.  Plus, the ACLU accuses a Georgia sheriff’s office of hosting a conference featuring a known anti-Muslim, a poll that shows one GOP candidate for governor gaining support, and why House Speaker Paul Ryan is coming to Atlanta.

On this edition of Political Rewind, qualifying for every race on the Georgia ballot begins today, and for the first time in recent memory, newly energized Democrats are looking to challenge GOP supremacy in the state legislature and in statewide offices.  Plus, Secretary of State Brian Kemp is bowing to pressure to change what the ACLU calls misleading voter registration forms.  Will questions about the integrity of Georgia elections hamper Kemp in his race for governor? 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

ACLU Of Georgia Names Former DeKalb CEO Burrell Ellis Political Director

Dec 5, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

A former county leader whose convictions on corruption charges were tossed out by the state's highest court has been named political director for the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia.

The organization on Monday announced that former DeKalb County CEO Burrell Ellis would fill the newly created position, which is meant to expand the organization's advocacy infrastructure and help push its public policy objectives.

The U.S. Supreme Court confronts the digital age again on Wednesday when it hears oral arguments in a case that promises to have major repercussions for law enforcement and personal privacy.

At issue is whether police have to get a search warrant in order to obtain cellphone location information that is routinely collected and stored by wireless providers.

Cellphone thieves caught because they used ... cellphones

On Second Thought For Monday, July 31, 2017

Jul 31, 2017

First, 50,000 Fulton County voters received letters saying they may be declared inactive, because they didn’t update the address on their voter registration cards. The Georgia ACLU is threatening legal action against the state, claiming it’s actions are in violation of the Voter Registration Act of 1993. But is this simple housekeeping for an elections system, or part of an effort to make it harder for some people to vote? Joining us is Andra Gillespie, Emory University Political Science Professor.

The highest court in Massachusetts ruled Monday that local law enforcement cannot keep people in custody solely at the request of federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The practice, often known as an "ICE detainer," enabled federal authorities to take a longer look at the immigration status of people whom they suspect might be in the country illegally, even if they were otherwise free to leave.

Branden Camp / AP Photo

Since its passage in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act has become a symbol to civil liberties activists for any law which invades personal freedoms in the name of preventing terrorism. But a new law which went into effect on July 1 has Georgia’s branch of the American Civil Liberties Union saying it’s even broader than the Patriot Act.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Landmark Decision in LGBT Workers' Rights Case

May 16, 2017

For the first time, a federal court has ruled workers can’t be fired for their sexual orientation. A court in Chicago recently extended workplace protections in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to the LGBT community.  A similar case in Georgia is up for appeal. We talk with a lawyer for both cases, Greg Nevins, and with Andrea Young, director of the ACLU of Georgia.

Donald Trump won the presidency back in November, but for many liberal organizations, the battle continues. A loose network of lawyers and watchdogs has dug in to scrutinize issues involving the Trump administration's ethics and transparency.

Key topics include: the conflicts between Trump's business interests and his presidential duties; the constitutional questions raised by his foreign profits; and the performance of his appointees, many of whom now run agencies overseeing the industries they themselves came from.

The American Civil Liberties Union announced on Wednesday that its affiliates had filed 13 coordinated Freedom of Information Act lawsuits, demanding government documents related to implementation of the president's executive orders on travel and immigration.

As the Trump administration considers steps to implement what the president has called extreme vetting of foreigners at the border, one aspect of security screening has already been amped up.

The number of people who have been asked to hand over their cellphones and passwords by Customs and Border Protection agents has increased nearly threefold in recent years. This is happening to American citizens as well as foreign visitors.

Superior Court of Fulton County

According to recent studies, parents are choosing less common names for their children. The Georgia Department of Public Health refused to issue a birth certificate to a couple who chose a unique surname for their daughter.

The numbers, in several cases, are astounding. 350.org, a climate action group, saw donations almost triple in the month after Donald Trump's election. Since Trump's win, Planned Parenthood told NPR it's gained over 600,000 new donors and more than 36,000 new volunteers. And the American Civil Liberties Union has raised more than $80 million since Nov. 8.

In a reversal, the Supreme Court will not decide Gavin Grimm's lawsuit over a school policy that requires students to use the bathroom corresponding to their biological sex. The court was scheduled to hear the case this month.

David Goldman / Associated Press

A challenge to the state law that prohibits the abortion of a fetus after 20 weeks of pregnancy is scheduled to be heard by the Georgia Supreme Court on Monday.  The hearing will determine whether or not a lower court judge’s decision to dismiss the challenge was justified.

The law was passed by the Georgia General Assembly in 2012. It restricts abortions from being performed five months after conception, except when a fetus has a severe defect or the life and health of the mother is being protected. Cases of rape or incest are not considered exceptions.