Abortion

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A federal judge on Tuesday said that Georgia's abortion law cannot take effect while a larger legal challenge is pending.

The Living Infants Fairness and Equality Act bans most abortions once fetal cardiac activity is detected, around six weeks into pregnancy. The law was slated to take effect Jan. 1, 2020.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A coalition of groups in opposition to the state's tighter abortion law have filed a motion to block it from taking effect.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia, Planned Parenthood and the Center for Reproductive Rights requested a preliminary injunction Tuesday in federal court. 

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Marshae Jones, an Alabama woman charged with manslaughter for allegedly starting a fight that led to her getting shot and having a miscarriage, will not face prosecution after all. The prosecutor has decided not to pursue the charge, but the incident started a conversation about negligence and culpability for pregnant women in an era of increasingly restrictive abortion laws. 

With the potential increase to the liability pregnant women face, legal questions arise surrounding when a pregnant woman is addicted to drugs. On Second Thought looked at how current and pending laws converge with Georgia’s opioid crisis.


The empty courtroom is seen at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the American Civil Liberties Union of Georgia has filed a lawsuit asking the federal court to block implementation of the state’s restrictive new abortion law.  ACLU Director Andrea Young joins us to discuss the basis for the suit.


GPB

Today on Political Rewind, with two recent appointments Gov. Brian Kemp looks to broaden and diversify Republican leadership in the state. 

In the era of “fake news” and “alternative facts,” the focus on language in politics is high. What a bill is or campaign is called can be just as important as the actual contents. With the recent string of “heartbeat” and related bills in several states, we took a look at the role language plays into how we debate issues in public. 

Dr Fern Johnson, professor emerita in English at Clark University, joined us to talk about the power of connotation and the tools legislators use. Her research centers on the discourse surrounding ethnicity, race and gender.

Bob Andres / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

The state of Georgia — and the country — is divided over so-called "heartbeat" bills and other new state laws restricting abortion. Many are confused about who could be prosecuted and what, exactly, constitutes a violation of the law.

On Second Thought leaves the flashpoints of politics behind and attempts to get some clarity on the legal questions raised by HB 481.


Marco Verch / Flickr

A flood of major entertainment companies have issued cautious statements about future filming in Georgia if a new abortion law takes effect, amidst national calls for a boycott and local concern over the state's booming film and television industry.

CBS, Sony, AMC, WarnerMedia, NBCUniversal, Disney and Netflix will monitor what could be a lengthy legal fight over the Living Infants Fairness and Equality Act, which would effectively ban abortions in the state except for cases of rape and incest with a police report, when the health of the mother is in jeopardy or the pregnancy is declared "medically futile."

The law also gives personhood rights to an embryo once cardiac activity is detected.


Emma Nigut

On this edition of Political Rewind, a federal judge has blocked the Mississippi abortion bill that closely resembles Georgia’s new “fetal heartbeat” measure. It is the latest judicial action halting new state laws that severely restrict abortion. What would this mean for Georgia’s new law?

 


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A newly-signed abortion law in Georgia has some district attorneys saying women who have abortions could face criminal charges for their actions. But, others say it's not possible to file charges because of existing statutes and case law, or won't because of prosecutorial discretion.  

A survey of Georgia's 49 elected district attorneys shows a range of reactions to the Living Infants Fairness and Equality Act, which would ban nearly all abortions once cardiac activity is detected in an embryo, usually around six weeks into pregnancy and before many women know they are pregnant.  

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Holding signs reading “Stop the bans,” "Our bodies, our choice" and “You, yes you: run for office!” several hundred people spilled out from the steps to the street outside the Gold Dome Tuesday afternoon.

They chanted, "Abortion is a human right, and we won't go without a fight," and "Hey hey, ho ho, abortion bans have got to go," while speakers from groups such as Sister Song and the American Civil Liberties of Georgia reminded the crowd abortion is still legal in Georgia and urged them to stay involved in their calls for expanded reproductive rights.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

U.S. Senator and 2020 presidential hopeful Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) spoke against a slew of abortion restrictions passed in states across the country Thursday at the Georgia state Capitol.

“Right now, entirely too much of the conversation about what women can do with our own bodies is being driven by a group of right-wing male politicians,” Gillibrand said, flanked by female state lawmakers, health providers and abortion rights supporters. “It’s time for that conversation to be led by the actual experts: women and doctors.”

John Bazemore / AP

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp has delayed an annual trip to Los Angeles to promote Georgia's film industry as movie executives, producers and actors criticize the state's new abortion ban.

Bob Andres / AP

If a new Mississippi law survives a court challenge, it will be nearly impossible for most pregnant women to get an abortion there.

Or, potentially, in neighboring Louisiana. Or Alabama. Or Georgia.

Bob Andres / The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

On this edition of Political Rewind, Gov. Kemp makes good on a campaign promise. He has signed H.B. 481 into law. The measure all but outlaws abortion in Georgia.

 


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Gov. Brian Kemp will be signing a controversial measure Tuesday that effectively bans abortions after six weeks of pregnancy and gives certain personhood rights to a fetus. 

HB 481 will be signed at 10 a.m. in the governor's ceremonial office at the Capitol.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

On the final day of the legislative session, actress Alyssa Milano and several local film and television workers held a press conference in opposition to a bill that would effectively end abortion in Georgia around 6 weeks into pregnancy.

State Rep. Ed Setzler, R-Acworth, asks questions during a committe hearing at the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta.
David Goldman / AP Photo

Georgia is on track to have the toughest abortion laws in the country – and to have that law challenged in court.

Followed by a smattering of “Shame!” from the gallery, the Georgia House gave final passage to HB 481, which would effectively ban abortion once a heartbeat is detected, around six weeks into pregnancy and before most women know they are pregnant.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

The Georgia state senate has passed a bill that would effectively ban abortions and give an embryo certain legal rights.

After nearly five hours of emotional, often personal testimony from several senators, HB 481 passed along party lines 34-18.

Senators read letters from constituents detailing their stories of abortions, shared anecdotes about pregnancy and in one case, a poem written shortly after the birth of their first daughter.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

By the end of the week, the Georgia Senate could join the ranks of other state legislatures when they vote on a so-called “heartbeat bill” that would effectively ban abortions about six weeks into pregnancy.

While the proposed restrictions grab headlines, abortion rights opponents say the aim of this type of bill isn’t only to limit access to the procedure, but also to trigger a Supreme Court challenge to federal protections for abortion.

Both abortion rights advocates and opponents say language in Georgia’s bill could make the case.

 


The Georgia General Assembly session begins on January 14, 2019.
Ken Lund / Creative Commons

By the end of crossover day, bills must be clear of one chamber or the other to remain in play for the rest of the legislative session. The state House and Senate passed a wave of legislation by the deadline, including a "heartbeat" abortion bill. GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler and Capitol correspondent for GPB TV's "Lawmakers," Donna Lowry, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss this week in Georgia politics.


GPB News

The Georgia House passed a bill Thursday that would greatly restrict access to abortions.

HB 481 passed 93-73 after more than an hour of passionate debate from both sides of the issue and the aisle. 

The bill, sponsored by Rep. Ed Setzler (R-Acworth), would ban doctors from performing an abortion once a heartbeat is detected, which is around six weeks into pregnancy, with a few exceptions.

GPB/ Grant Blankenship

Gov. Brian Kemp released a video Thursday urging legislators to pass a so-called "heartbeat" abortion bill before the Crossover Day deadline.

Kemp, who vowed on the campaign trail to sign the "toughest abortion laws in the country" if elected, appears to be sticking to his promise. 

The 2019 legislative session is nearing a pivotal moment: Crossover Day.

Lawmakers have made it through nearly two months of committee meetings, floor debates and votes, but many big-name measures have not yet passed the House or the Senate and crossed over to the other chamber.

Here’s a look at major legislation that has not yet been voted on.

RURAL TRANSPORTATION

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, it’s been some time since legislators have taken a serious look at further restrictions on abortion in Georgia. But now, a move to all but make the procedure illegal is up for consideration and Gov. Kemp has added his voice to the debate. Our panel looks at what might be the most explosive issue of the 2019 session.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A bill that will be filed in the Georgia House would virtually ban abortions if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns its Roe v. Wade decision or if states are allowed to outlaw abortion.

In a press release Thursday, Gov. Brian Kemp announced support for the bill, which provides a maximum penalty of $100,000 fine and 10 years in prison for someone who performs an abortion.

On the campaign trail, Kemp vowed to pass the "toughest abortion laws in the country."

Ezra Morris / GPB

It's a week before Crossover Day, the last day a bill can survive this session without passing either the House or the Senate.

That means it's crunch time for bills that have been filed, as well as a slew of bills that are both new and controversial.

Here's some highlights:

-The House passed the record $27.5 billion FY 2020 budget, which adds a $2,775 raise for teachers - and other school staff. Also included is $150 million for new voting machines, training for local poll workers and other maintenance costs.

State Rep. Ed Setzler, R-Acworth, asks questions during a committe hearing at the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta.
David Goldman / AP Photo

If passed, a law proposed this week in Georgia’s house of representatives would make the state the most restrictive when it comes to abortion regulations.

Republican lawmaker Ed Setzler filed HB 481 titled the “Living Infants Fairness and Equality Act” or the Life Act. The legislation would require “physicians performing abortions to determine the existence of a human heartbeat before performing an abortion.”

GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump’s former lawyer Michael Cohen is continuing his appearance before the House Oversight Committee on capitol hill. Have we learned anything new from his public testimony? Meanwhile, the President is in Hanoi meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.


GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, plans to expand broadband to rural Georgia may be in jeopardy after legislators kill a bill that would pay for the project with a tax on video streaming services. Where will the funds to pay for the project come now?


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