On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9 a.m.

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays.

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit our Facebook group.

MARTA

It's hard enough to eat well and stay in shape, but, in several parts of Georgia, residents don't even have access to nutritious foods. 

The Georgia Farmers Market Association is trying to bring awareness to the issue and help overcome barriers to access. Its initiatives connect small growers with communities that don't have good options to buy fresh, high-quality meat and produce. 


WNYC Studios / WNYC Studios

Kay Powell is not easily spooked. The veteran reporter and longtime obituaries editor of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is known as "the doyenne of the death beat." She recently shared on an episode of WNYC's podcast, "Ten Things That Scare Me," that it's not the great beyond she fears, but the great decline.

 

The podcast invites listeners to expose their 3 a.m. ruminations with the rest of the world, which producer Daniel Guillemette said builds people's collective sense of empathy. He and Powell joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the rational and irrational fears people share on the show.

 

We're in the final weeks of the 2019 legislative session, and lawmakers are not going out quietly. They're debating changes to Georgia's abortion laws. House Bill 481, otherwise known as the "heartbeat" bill, already passed the House last week. Republican Rep. Ed Setzler of Acworth, the bill's sponsor, says he aims to prevent doctors from performing an abortion if a fetal heartbeat is detected. 

GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler and "Lawmakers" Capitol correspondent Donna Lowry stopped by "On Second Thought" with an update on that legislation and other bills making their way through the Gold Dome.


Pixabay

Precocious students from around the state gathered in Atlanta on March 15 for the Georgia Association of Educators State Spelling Bee. The winner could advance to the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington in May.

We asked a few of the champion spellers to share their secrets for successful spelling. Braden Flournoy, Ananya Augustine and Abhi Kapaganty also told us their favorite words to spell. 


Dulcé Sloan Facebook

Georgia native Dulcé Sloan is a comedian, actress and correspondent on "The Daily Show with Trevor Noah." Sloan started her stage career at Meadowcreek High School in Gwinnett County. After earning her degree in theater from Brenau University in Gainesville, Sloan was convinced to try her hand at comedy in Atlanta's stand-up circuit. In 2016, she made her big break: a late-night debut on "Conan."

Sloan joined "On Second Thought" from NPR in New York for a conversation about "The Daily Show," MARTA expansion, Waffle House and Georgia politics.


Julie Markes / Associated Press

The '90s sitcom, "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air," ran for six seasons and launched Will Smith as a cultural icon. The show followed Smith as a fictionalized version of himself as he moved from Philadelphia to live with his aunt and uncle in the wealthy neighborhood of Bel-Air in Los Angeles.

An upcoming book series reimagines the story with a new character, a fresh princess named Destiny. Author Denene Millner is writing "The Fresh Princess" series and joined "On Second Thought" to discuss her work as an author.

Courtesy Shepherd Center

In 1973, Atlanta native James Shepherd Jr. graduated from the University of Georgia. He then backpacked through Europe and Africa before heading to Rio de Janeiro in Brazil. There, in the waves off Rio’s famous beaches, Shepherd suffered a near-fatal accident. Teams of doctors in Brazil and the United States said he would never walk again.

Then, he did. After two years of intensive rehabilitation, James; his parents, Alana and Harold; and Dr. David Apple founded Shepherd Center in Atlanta. What began as a six-bed unit with a long waiting list now treats nearly 1,000 patients each year.


Lizzy Johnston

Caroline Ervin and Cristen Conger said they were "printed word nerds" in college and both worked on University of Georgia's esteemed Red and Black newspaper. They reunited years later as hosts of the How Stuff Works podcast, "Stuff Mom Never Told You." Now, they've launched their own podcast, published a book and started a media company.

Ervin and Conger joined "On Second Thought" to discuss founding Unladylike Media, the stories that excite them and the importance of highlighting women's voices and experiences.


Caroline Ervin and Cristen Conger made a splash with their How Stuff Works podcast “Stuff Mom Never Told You.”  Now, the Georgia duo has transitioned to entrepreneurship with a company called Unladylike Media.  The two host a weekly, feminist podcast that shares their company’s name.  Caroline says it’s, “where we investigate what happens when women break the rules.” Along with the podcast, they also have a book out called, “Unladylike: A Field Guide to Smashing the Patriarchy and Claiming Your Space.” Caroline and Cristen talked feminism and journalism with “On Second Thought” host Virginia Prescott.

 

Angela Morris

The Atlanta Symphony Orchestra unveils its lineup for the 2019/2020 season today. Sarah Zaslaw, who hosts “The ASO on GPB” and “Nightcap,” brings "On Second Thought" this preview of what’s to come with ASO music director Robert Spano.


Courtesy of Big Fibbers Storytelling Festival

The truth never gets in the way of a good story at the Big Fibbers Storytelling Festival in Rome. Comedians, fabulists and tellers of tall tales from all over will gather there Friday. 

Among the unreliable narrators is comedian and storyteller Andy Offutt Irwin. Irwin is a featured fibber at this year's event. He spoke with "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott about the character he will portray at the festival. 


Daylight saving time is behind us, and spring is just around the corner. To celebrate, "On Second Thought" is reflecting on a Southern icon: The Quercus virginiana is Georgia's official tree. It's better known as the live oak tree and has held the title since 1937.

These majestic, ancient trees are symbols of the South in postcards, films and online travel sites. Greg Levine, co-executive director and chief program officer at Trees Atlanta, stopped by the show to explain the history and nature of live oak trees. 


Courtesy of AP Images

Daylight saving time is behind us, and spring is just around the corner. To celebrate, "On Second Thought" is reflecting on a Southern icon: The Quercus virginiana is Georgia's official tree. It's better known as the live oak tree and has held the title since 1937. 

These majestic, ancient trees are symbols of the South in postcards, films and online travel sites. Greg Levine from Trees Atlanta stopped by the show to explain the history and nature of live oak trees. 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that drowning is one of the top three causes of unintentional deaths for people under 29 years old, and the risk for black children between ages 5 and 14 is three times higher than for white children.

Courtesy of AP Images

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show Georgia has the highest rate of new Human Immunodeficiency Viruses (HIV) infections proportionate to population. The problem is especially severe in metro Atlanta. 

President Trump is proposing $291 million in funding to end HIV transmissions in the United States by 2030. "On Second Thought" wanted to know how realistic this goal was, so Dr. Carlos del Rio from the Emory School of Public Health joined the show to discuss the initiative and how it affects Georgia. 


AP Photo/John Bazemore

Collisions that involve cars, pedestrians and bicycles are on the rise across the U.S., including in Georgia. The Atlanta Regional Commission reported a 53 percent jump in such collisions in metro Atlanta between 2006 and 2015. The number of serious injuries or fatalities from these collisions over that time went up by 26 percent.

 

Thomas Wheatley is articles editor for Atlanta Magazine and recently wrote an article covering the issue of rising bicycle and pedestrian fatalities in Atlanta. He joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the causes of increased collisions — and efforts to reduce them.

 

 

Eighteen miles of I-85 could be an on-ramp to the future. The Ray C. Anderson Memorial Highway, or The Ray, stretches from West Point to LaGrange. Named for a carpet manufacturer once called the "greenest CEO," The Ray is now a proving ground for technologies that could make infrastructure safer and more ecologically sustainable. So, how would it work? We asked Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray.


Randolf Rautenberg / Flickr

Eighteen miles of I-85 could be an on-ramp to the future.

The Ray C. Anderson Memorial Highway, or The Ray, stretches from West Point to LaGrange. Named for a carpet manufacturer once called the "greenest CEO," The Ray is now a proving ground for technologies that could make infrastructure safer and more ecologically sustainable.

So, how would it work? We asked Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray.


The Georgia General Assembly session begins on January 14, 2019.
Ken Lund / Creative Commons

By the end of crossover day, bills must be clear of one chamber or the other to remain in play for the rest of the legislative session. The state House and Senate passed a wave of legislation by the deadline, including a "heartbeat" abortion bill. GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler and Capitol correspondent for GPB TV's "Lawmakers," Donna Lowry, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss this week in Georgia politics.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

GPB's series, "Macon Conversations," brings together folks from different backgrounds to have honest conversations about race. Tonja Khabir and Katie Powers were a part of the series. Khabir is the executive director of the Griffith Family Foundation, which provides grants to programs in the Macon community. Powers is the founder of Macon Book 'Em, a nonprofit that provides books to at-risk communities.


On today's show, GPB reporters recapped events from crossover day at the Capitol, "Macon Conversations" addressed issues of identity, and the Dining for Women founder helped preview GPB's International Women's Day Panel.

During crossover day, bills must be clear of one chamber or the other to remain in play for the rest of the legislative session. Both chambers passed a wave of legislation by the deadline, including a "heartbeat" abortion bill. GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler and Capitol correspondent for GPB TV's "Lawmakers," Donna Lowry, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss this week in Georgia politics.

Friday, March 8, is International Women's Day. To mark the occasion, "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott is moderating a panel of powerful women at GPB


AP/File

Note: The audio posted of this interview was edited from an earlier version because our guest did not feel he accurately characterized Ben Sidran’s research on some aspects of early Vaudeville and Minstrel shows.

In the United States, Jewish people were denied access to industries, education, neighborhood spaces and opportunities. The burgeoning popular music field in the late 19th and 20th centuries was an ideal space to find freedom and creative expression for Jewish musicians. Artists such as Al Jolson, Irving Berlin, George and Ira Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein wove their traditions into music that was more inclusive and indelibly American.

 

 


Women's educational opportunities in the 19th Century were few and far between. Finishing schools focused on women's socialization and skills like art, music and French, rather than a rigorous academic curriculum.

The Lucy Cobb Institute in Athens aimed to change that. It opened in 1859 and taught women finishing school skills alongside math and science classes. The institute cemented Athens as a place for women's education in the South.

 


AP Photo

Many people will pay for Beyoncé concert tickets, but what about paying for a Beyoncé class for credit?

A group of college students at Valdosta State University is studying the work of "Queen Bey" this semester. The focus is on "Lemonade," the mega-star's sixth studio album accompanied by a visual album on HBO.

Caterina Orr is adjunct instructor of African-American studies at Valdosta State. She spoke with "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott about the course that kicked off this semester.


University Of Georgia

Women's educational opportunities in the 19th Century were few and far between. Finishing schools focused on women's socialization and skills like art, music and French, rather than a rigorous academic curriculum.

 

The Lucy Cobb Institute in Athens aimed to change that. It opened in 1859 and taught women finishing school skills alongside math and science classes. The institute cemented Athens as a place for women's education in the South.

 


Last week, the governing body of the United Methodist Church voted to uphold a ban on same-sex marriage and openly gay clergy.  The “Traditional Plan” won by a narrow margin at the annual meeting of the General Conference.  It defeated the “One Church Plan,” which would have allowed local congregations to make their own decisions on LGBT issues.

Dean of the Emory’s Candler School of Theology, Jan Love, was at the conference.  The school is one of thirteen Methodist seminaries in the country. During “On Second Thought,” Dean Love explored the implications of the vote here in Georgia.

 


(AP Photo/Sid Hastings)

Last week, the governing body of the United Methodist Church voted to uphold a ban on same-sex marriage and openly gay clergy.  The “Traditional Plan” won by a narrow margin at the annual meeting of the General Conference.  It defeated the “One Church Plan,” which would have allowed local congregations to make their own decisions on LGBT issues.

Jan Love, dean of Emory University's Candler School of Theology, was at the conference. The school is one of 13 Methodist seminaries in the country. During “On Second Thought,” Love explored the implications of the vote here in Georgia.


Provided by author, Samantha Allen

Author and journalist Samantha Allen wanted to go beyond the headlines in her new book, "Real Queer America: LGBT Stories from Red States."

"Often the stories we hear are just, 'Oh, this anti-LGBT law got passed' or 'This anti-LGBT law got stopped,' and we're not really seeing what's happening on the ground," said Allen.

From Provo, Utah, to Atlanta, Georgia, Allen's book explores the reasons why LGBT people stay and work for change in their communities, even when said communities might not openly accept or welcome them. Allen joined "On Second Thought" to discuss what her road trip taught her about the meaning of family and home.


A tornado whipped through Southeast Alabama Sunday evening along the Georgia border, causing injuries and property damage through both states. Gov. Brian Kemp declared a state of emergency in Grady, Harris and Talbot counties on Monday due to storm damage. The Lee County sheriff said 23 people have died thus far in the Alabama county where the tornado touched down.

GPB's Grant Blankenship joined "On Second Thought" to discuss his reporting on the storm's impact in Georgia. He said affected areas in Georgia are some of the same ones still recovering from Hurricane Michael.

 


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