Stefanie Fernández

New year, new playlist. Each week, Alt.Latino brings you top hits and hidden gems from the Latin music world. So far, 2019 has brought a new Ozuna hit, an episode from Locos por Juana's Postcards of Miami series and Juan Wauters singing entirely en español for the first time.

NPR Music's Alt.Latino podcast recently released its year-end list of 2018's best songs and albums. Along the way, the team has done some reading and deep thinking about a trend that started in 2017 has only gained momentum: In the world of streaming music services, Latin artists have been cleaning up.

It's time for the weekly roundup of the best Latin music, thoughtfully curated by Felix Contreras and Stefanie Fernández. This week's playlist features Afro-Caribbean beats from ÌFÉ, Latin trap from Anuel AA & Haze and a dance track from veteran performers Wisin y Yandel.

After a week spent ranking the best Latin music of 2018, it's time to get back to recent releases.

I say this to anyone who will listen: Latin music these days is exploding with so much creativity and inspiration that it is simply overwhelming. Once you get past the billions of views on YouTube of the reggaeton- inspired pop music, you'll find myriad artists who consider their cultural backgrounds a blank canvas on which they express their sense of self and identity.

Kick off the holidays with the best new Latin music, curated right here by Alt.Latino. This week, Cuñao releases the Invierno Tropical EP to warm up your winter, C.

Every week, Alt.Latino lines up the best new Latin music, featuring both global superstars and emerging artists on this rise. For this week's playlist, J Balvin has releases another hit, Helado Negro previews his sixth album, Juracán and Rene Lopez drop new singles and Draco Rosa flexes his rock and roll chops.

Alt.Latino's playlist this week is stacked with heavy hitters. Colombia's Aterciopelados released a music video for their nominated song "Dúo" in advance of the 2018 Latin Grammys on Nov. 15 and Bad Bunny has dropped yet another collab, this time with Jennifer Lopez.

This week, Alt.Latino's playlist features five new songs stretching from Spain to Argentina: Rosalía's sophomore album weds pop and flamenco, L.A.-based Mitre and Argentina's Pipo Rodriguez release stadium-ready anthems, El Alfa teams up with Cardi B for a surprise dance track and Lindi Ortega covers Leonard Cohen.

This week, the five new songs on Alt.Latino's playlist represent a mix of tradition and experimentation. Nancy Sanchez's jazzy rendition of "Angel Baby" has a new video, Gente De Zona reinterprets the Cuban music canon and Nicola Cruz keeps pushing South American rhythms to new spheres. Meanwhile, La Doña and Vicente García (with Juan Luis Guerra) have both released dance-friendly new singles.

Latin forays into the pop realm continued unabated last week, and while Drake rapping en espanol may have commanded most of the attention, it was far from the only noteworthy song. Ozuna and Selena Gomez on the same song? Yes, it happened. We also received music from our favorite garage punks from Mexico and discovered two new tracks from way down south — the Southern Cone to be exact.

This week, there's something new for every corner of the Latinternet. On the pop music front, Nicky Jam brought on Bad Bunny and Arcangel for "Satisfacción," proving themselves some of the busiest Latinos in music this summer. Internet kids Cuco and Clairo teamed up for a sweet trying-to-appear-older track because the law virtually required it, Miguel leaned in further to his Afro-Mexican roots on a Spanish version of "Banana Clip," and Ivy Queen tore a vicious vecina to shreds with a hilarious diss track.

As part of Turning the Tables, NPR Music compiled a list of 200 greatest songs by women and non-binary artists in the 21st Century.

This week, we heard a lot of great music from up-and-comers of every genre, from Puerto Rican trap-makers Bryant Myers' and Bad Bunny's sad boy jam "Triste" to the slow-and-sultry, Barry White-inspired stylings of Jesse Baez.

9 a.m. Friday. Miami. You're stuck on the Palmetto Expressway, already late to your "minimum" "wage" desk job when you get a call: Sofi, your Soulcycling best friend with the ever-perfect manicure. "Muchaaaacha! Where are you?" she says. Her tío is out of town and lent her the boat. Juanchi, the dude you've had your eye on who resembles Maluma in abs, tiny man-bun and net worth, will be there. WYD?

This week, the music got intense. With "Pienso En Tu Mirá," 24-year-old flamenco singer Rosalía is proving to be one of the most inventive young players in Latin music ahead of her second album El Mal Querer, a more polished and produced genre experiment than her strictly acoustic debut album, 2017's Los Angeles.

Jeff Rosenstock has always made music for the slow days after the end-times, and "All This Useless Energy" is a kick-the-can punk ballad for crawling out of aimlessness toward a purpose.

This week, musicians all over Latin America asked a lot of questions. Mala Rodríguez's first solo song since 2013 leads with the question, "Who protects me?" For La Mala, the question comes from an empowered, long-scorned woman. Gaby Moreno asks the same question, but for Central American immigrants. Other truth-seekers this week: New York-based Mexican singer Marrón offers a breezy respite and Cuban reggaeton (read: Cubaton) singer El Micha wants you to stop lying to yourself.

As the temperature outside climbs well into the 90s, we're getting a bit restless. Luckily, this week Bad Bunny released not one but two bangers to keep us moving, and his collaborator, Arcangel's old other-half De La Ghetto, released a love bop with Maluma and Wisin that will make you yearn for the simpler romances of childhood. Meanwhile, L.A. hometown heroes Inner Wave provide a silky synth wave ballad that will make you want to fall in love in someone's Honda Civic.

Friends, a lot happened over the weekend. On Friday, Luis Fonsi proved once again that he can get millions of views with a well-drawled ayyyyy on any given beach in Puerto Rico; this time, he got an unexpected assist from U.K. grime star Stefflon Don. On Saturday, Daddy Yankee recruited the recently reunited old-school duo R.K.M. and Ken-Y for another go at it, now that reggaeton seems to (finally) be having its mainstream moment.

For Latinos all over the world, the arrival of summer can mean a lot of things: piraguas, block parties, backyard-grown tropical fruit sold out of the trunks of cars. This year in the music world, summer means the return of Cuban hip-hop trio Orishas after a 10-year hiatus, la reina Ivy Queen's contribution to reggaeton season, Dos Santos' psychedelic cumbia funk and more.

In the history of world domination schemes, there hasn't been a conqueror that took over the Earth in Spanish since Christopher Columbus. J Balvin is ready to reclaim the music world for his people.

Hell is real and L.A. punk band Hit Bargain has been there. It's in Ohio.

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