Rickey Bevington

Senior Anchor/ Correspondent

Rickey Bevington is an internationally recognized journalist and speaker who believes that well-informed citizens are the bedrock of democracy. Her 2017 TEDx talk "The Future Of News Media Is In Our Hands" empowers viewers to combat fake news.  Based in Atlanta, Bevington is a mainstay with Georgians as local host of NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Her radio and television stories have drawn honors from Edward R. Murrow Awards (2016, 2014), Southeast EMMYS (2014), Atlanta Press Club, Society of Professional Journalists and the Associated Press.   Prior to becoming Senior Anchor/Correspondent at Georgia Public Broadcasting, Bevington worked in cable entertainment at Sundance Channel and Showtime Networks, local TV news at WFSB-TV 3 (CBS) in Hartford, Conn., publishing at Fodor's and the Hartford Courant, and reporting for NPR and PBS Newshour.  Bevington fosters democractic discourse both locally and globally. Each month, she hosts a live radio program with Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms answering audience questions. In 2019, she trained at the Council on Foreign Relations and then traveled to Ukraine to explore propaganda and civic engagment. In 2018, she received a grant to study media freedoms in Hungary and Serbia.  In 2015 and 2016, Georgia Trend Magazine and the Atlanta Business Chronicle named Bevington among the "40 Under 40" leaders making a positive impact in Georgia. In 2014, Bevington was appointed to a prestigious Marshall Memorial Fellowship by the German Marshall Fund of the United States. She studied public policy and transatlantic relations in Belgium, Sweden, Montenegro, Poland and Germany.  Bevington’s prior experience includes traveling in 2013 with the U.S. Department of State studying political parties of Sri Lanka and India. In 2011, she journeyed to Jordan, Egypt, Israel and Greece with the Middle East Travel Seminar.  Bevington sits on the boards of the Atlanta Press Club and the Associated Press Media Editors of Georgia.

Ways to Connect

In 1970, a riot devastated the African American neighborhoods of Augusta, Georgia. Remarkably, many locals and historians have never heard of this historic event.

Journalist Sea Stachura joined GPB All Things Considered host Rickey Bevington to discuss “Shots In The Back: Exhuming the 1970 Augusta Riot.” It’s a new podcast from Georgia Public Broadcasting and the Jessye Norman School of the Arts.


Jud McCranie

Georgians are again debating what to do with hundreds of public memorials to the Confederacy. It's a disagreement Georgians are accustomed to having. 

In the 1990s Gov. Zell Miller was sued when he tried to remove the Confederate battle emblem from the state flag. A decade later, the state legislature removed it.  A few years ago, Gov. Nathan Deal quietly replaced “Confederate Memorial Day” with “State Holiday” on state employee memos.

Erick Requadt / U.S. Air Force

Georgia's new hate crimes law goes into effect this week. 

It means stiffer penalties for violence against a person based on things such as race, religion, national origin, sex, gender, sexual orientation and disabilities.

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Georgia has received more than $4 billion from the federal government to cover coronavirus-related spending by state and local governments.  Many cities and counties have not received their share of the funding.  

It's outlined in a new report by the Georgia News Lab. Deputy editor Laura Corley joined GPB’s All Things Considered host Rickey Bevington.  

 


   

GPB/Donna Lowry

Georgia state lawmakers return to the Capitol on Monday to finish the legislative session that was interrupted by the coronavirus pandemic.

Only 10 working days remain in the session. In that time, lawmakers need to pass a budget, including an 11-percent cut because of pandemic-related revenue losses.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

All eyes were on Georgia’s election Tuesday, and not in the way officials hoped.  In parts of metro Atlanta, voters waited more than four hours in line as some polling places had issues with a new $104 million dollar voting system.  Now, both Democrats and Republicans want answers about what happened and what can be fixed before November.

BBC World Service

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms responded publicly Wednesday to national calls to "defund the police" after the death of George Floyd.

Answering a question from Councilmember Marci Collier Overstreet, Bottoms told Atlanta City Council that calls to defund the police are actually about re-thinking what gets funded.

Wikimedia jenaragon94 (Flickr)

It’s hard to imagine SEC football stadiums at full capacity this fall as the coronavirus pandemic breeds uncertainty about the future of large gatherings. Sports fans and college athletes are bracing for the heartbreak of potentially not having a season when classes resume later this year.


Family photo

When Georgia was going into effective lockdown in March, Atlanta attorney Parker Sanders and his family opted to spend their coronavirus quarantine in rural Alabama. Since then, between teleworking and homeschooling, Sanders and his wife have been teaching their young sons to embrace life without city comforts. 

It’s the topic of our latest audio postcard from quarantine. From the safety of their homes, people are recording themselves on their phones or computers and emailing the audio to GPB’s All Things Considered host Rickey Bevington. 

Parker Sanders sends this audio postcard about taking advantage of quarantine to guide his young sons through the adventure of boyhood.  

Nadia Theodore

During a global pandemic, the work of a diplomat can slow down and speed up. That was case for Consul General of Canada in Atlanta Nadia Theodore, who represents six states in the U.S. Southeast including Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. 

As the coronavirus brought international flights and trade to a near halt in March and April, millions of people living, working and traveling abroad sought help from their nation’s consulates and embassies around the world. 

Consul General Theodore sends this audio postcard in which she reflects on the value of diplomacy and international relationships during the time of coronavirus.


Shyann Swanson

In February, a 25-year-old black man went for a run near his family's home outside of Brunswick, Georgia, when he was shot to death by two white men who said they thought he was a robber.

Now, the case of Ahmaud Arbery is making international news headlines after video reported to be of the shooting went viral.

GPB News

Georgia Public Broadcasting’s new series What You Need To Know: Coronavirus provides succinct, fact-based information to help you get through the coronavirus pandemic with your health and sanity intact.

When it comes to coronavirus, there is a lot of data. Cases change all the time, and that can be very confusing. GPB's Rickey Bevington asks GPB's Grant Blankenship to simplify the numbers.

An "extinction-level event" is how one news industry expert described the potential impact of the coronavirus pandemic on newspapers and other journalism outlets.

As millions of Americans rely on local news sources for coronavirus information, “roughly 36,000 workers at news companies in the U.S. have been laid off, been furloughed or had their pay reduced. Some publications that rely on ads have shut down,” according to the New York Times.

The topic is personal to Atlanta-based journalist Steve Fennessy, whose position as executive editor at Atlanta magazine was eliminated in March.

Fennessy sends this audio postcard to All Things Considered on GPB. This is the latest in our series of personal commentaries by people in quarantine who record themselves on their phones and email the audio to host Rickey Bevington.


Rose Riot Photography

“Being quarantined is somewhat like rabbits being put in the briar patch,” says former Atlanta Mayor Sam Massell in the latest of our series of audio postcard from Georgians reflecting on their lives in quarantine during the global coronavirus pandemic.  

Listeners to All Things Considered on GPB have been hearing voices of people who've recorded themselves on their phones or computers and emailed the audio to host Rickey Bevington. 

Born in 1927 in the Jewish neighborhood of Summerhill (whose modern landmark is Georgia State Stadium), Massell served as Atlanta mayor from 1970 to 1974, before Maynard Jackson took office as the city’s first African American mayor.   

Now in his early 90s, Massell retired in January from more than three decades of leadership at the powerful Buckhead Coalition business group. 

GPB News

Georgia Public Broadcasting’s new series What You Need To Know: Coronavirus provides succinct, fact-based information to help you get through the coronavirus pandemic with your health and sanity intact.

GPB's political reporter Stephen Fowler talks with GPB's Rickey Bevington about the precautions Georgia businesses are supposed to take as they reopen amid the pandemic.

All Things Considered on GPB is bringing you voices of Georgians reflecting on what the coronavirus pandemic and social distancing means to them.

From the safety of their homes where they're sheltering in place, they're recording themselves on their phones or computers and emailing the audio to host Rickey Bevington.

Kyle BlackCatTips Brooks, a folk artist from Georgia, sends this audio postcard reflecting on how disengaging from the world can feel like disconnecting from reality.


Hugh Acheson

All Things Considered on Georgia Public Broadcasting is bringing you audio postcards sent by people reflecting on how the coronavirus pandemic is impacting their lives. We've heard from actors, activists, and CEOs.

From the safety of their homes where they're sheltering in place, they're recording themselves on their phones or computers and emailing the audio to host Rickey Bevington.

Athens Chef Hugh Acheson, who closed his restaurants 5&10, Empire State South and By George, sends this postcard about why he's finding a way to feed thousands of hungry Georgians.  


City of Moultrie

The National Weather Service reports at least three tornadoes touched down in South Georgia this afternoon. Damage is reported in Mitchell, Clinch, Cook and Colquitt Counties.

 

So far no deaths are reported but damage to structures is significant in some places touching everything from farm buildings to homes to even the most sentimental community assets .

 

Chet Powell from Adel said while it may seem insignificant to some, the loss of the iconic "Big Oak" on West Meeting Street in Adel is a "terrible blow" to the community.

 

Bijal Shah

All Things Considered on Georgia Public Broadcasting is featuring the voices of people reflecting on what this time of the coronavirus and social distancing means to them. From the safety of their homes where they're sheltering in place, they're recording themselves on their phones or computers and emailing the audio to host Rickey Bevington.

Doug Shipman sends this audio postcard about being a father and a husband to a doctor working on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic.


Marian Liou

As millions of Americans stay at home to prevent the spread of coronavirus, All Things Considered on Georgia Public Broadcasting is bringing you people's personal reflections on this strange period in history and in our lives. From the safety of their homes where they're sheltering in place, they're recording themselves on their phones or computers and emailing the audio to host Rickey Bevington.

Marian Liou sends this audio postcard about how none of us escape the traumas of life but we can choose what we learn from them.


Kevin Gillese

All Things Considered on Georgia Public Broadcasting is launching a new series featuring people reflecting on what this time of the coronavirus and social distancing means to them. From the safety of their homes where they're sheltering in place, they're recording themselves on their phones or computers and emailing the audio to host Rickey Bevington.

In public radio, these first-person narrated essays are called audio postcards.

Atlanta-based writer/performers Kevin Gillese and Amber Nash ponder the purpose of comedians during a global health crisis.


GPB

Gov. Brian Kemp announced Monday Georgia was "on track" to begin reopening sectors of the economy as early as this week, while pledging to continue efforts to address the state’s lag in testing.

The statewide shelter-in-place order will still run through April 30.

In one move, the governor signed an order that would allow gyms, fitness centers, bowling alleys, barbers, cosmetologists and other previously-shuttered businesses to open their doors starting Friday, April 24.


Kerstin Joensson / AP

Getting needed supplies to hospitals has been a major challenge for governments around the world during the coronavirus pandemic.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Foundation and Microsoft launched the Global Health Crisis Coordination Center this week in Atlanta. 

The new collaboration between academia, private businesses and the non-profit sector has been in the works for 18 months. It was prompted to launch early as the coronavirus pandemic hit the U.S. 

Emily Jones / GPB News

New numbers out Thursday showed that nearly one in 10 Georgians has claimed unemployment benefits in the last month as the coronavirus spreads and shuts down much of the economy. The state's seaports are a major economic driver and support some nine percent of jobs in Georgia, while tourism is a key industry on the coast.

GPB Reporter Emily Jones spoke with All Things Considered Host Rickey Bevington about the impact on the coastal economy.


Atlanta History Center

The Atlanta History Center has launched an online platform for the public to help document the history of the coronavirus. 

GPB’s Rickey Bevington spoke with Atlanta History Center CEO Sheffield Hale, who began the conversation by describing what historical artifacts they're looking to collect. 

 


BBC World Service

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is highlighting the impact of the coronavirus on black Americans.

In an appearance Thursday on the BBC World News, Bottoms compared what’s happening in the United States with a saying she grew up hearing as a child.

“When white America catches a cold, black America catches the flu,” Bottoms recounted. “In this case, it is pneumonia in black America.”


GPB News

Georgia Public Broadcasting’s new series What You Need To Know: Coronavirus provides succinct, fact-based information to help you get through the coronavirus pandemic with your health and sanity intact. 

Atlanta Community Food Bank CEO Kyle Waide spoke with Rickey Bevington, host of GPB's All Things Considered, about the impact COVID-19 has had on food banks and the resources available for those who need assistance.

GPB News

Georgia Public Broadcasting’s new series What You Need To Know: Coronavirus provides succinct, fact-based information to help you get through the coronavirus pandemic with your health and sanity intact.

GPB's All Things Considered host Rickey Bevington spoke to Chip Burger about his recovery from COVID-19 and how his life changed since his release from Wellstar North Fulton Hospital.

GPB News

Georgia Public Broadcasting’s new series What You Need To Know: Coronavirus provides succinct, fact-based information to help you get through the coronavirus pandemic with your health and sanity intact. 

Hugh Acheson, celebrity chef and restauranteur speaks with Rickey Bevington, host of GPB's All Things Considered, about the impact COVID -19 has had on the restaurant community and best practices when using takeout.

Rickey Bevington / GPB News

As many of us worry about the health and welfare of ourselves and loved ones right now, people experiencing homelessness are especially vulnerable to the coronavirus. As of January 2019, the federal government estimates Georgia has more than 10,000 people without homes, including veterans, families and unaccompanied young adults.

Gov. Brian Kemp’s coronavirus task force has provided guidelines for communities to help the homeless in their coronavirus emergency planning.

Those recommendations were led by experts in Atlanta.


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