Pria Mahadevan

Producer, On Second Thought

Pria is a producer for GPB's program, On Second Thought.

Pria is passionate about using local journalism as a way to strengthen communities. She got her start in radio through KALW's Audio Academy program in San Francisco, but she has a diverse set of professional experiences outside of journalism. She studied cognitive neuroscience and Spanish at Washington University in St. Louis, and later worked as a financial consultant in Boston and taught English at a university in Brazil on a Fulbright scholarship.

After spending years exploring a variety of fields she finds interesting, Pria is thrilled to have found a career that lets her continue to explore new ideas every day. She has always loved storytelling, and she is excited that every day at GPB involves new ideas and challenges. She's eager to bring new voices to airwaves across Georgia. 

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of We Love BuHi

Buford Highway is an eight-mile stretch of highway between Atlanta and Buford, Georgia that has earned the reputation as the place to seek international cuisine in Atlanta.  But there’s more than just food – Buford Highway is also a thriving center of international cultures. More than a thousand immigrant-owned businesses have laid the economic and social foundations for building community along what the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce has called, “Atlanta’s International Corridor.”

We Love BuHi” started as an Instagram page in 2015 to highlight the local businesses along Buford Highway. Today, it’s a bona fide non-profit that aims to build connections across the various communities thriving there through storytelling, art and community events.


Being diagnosed with HIV is no longer a death sentence. In Atlanta, SisterLove, Inc. focuses on improving access to prevention resources. Tonight, the organization is honoring 20 women from across the country who are living with HIV at its 10th annual awards gala. On Second Thought hears from Dázon Dixon Diallo, the founder and president of Sisterlove Inc., and Cecilia Chung, one of the honorees at the event tonight, Oct. 18.

Rachael Joyce

The Rachel Maddow Show is the biggest draw on MSNBC’s primetime line-up. The show tilts against Fox News’ Sean Hannity in the high stakes battle for cable news viewers. Both hosts have large and obsessive audiences, and both have seen double digit jumps in ratings since congress launched an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

That story was roiling when Rachel Maddow made her way onto the stage, at an event sponsored by A Cappella Books last Sunday, Oct. 13. On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott interviewed Maddow at the Fox Theatre. Today’s episode is part of the interview from Sunday.


David Goldman / Associated Press

Farmers in Georgia have been impacted by a multitude of events in the last few years: hurricanes, stalled aid, trade policy and, on top of that, drought. 

In September, the Southeast saw record heat — with little to no rain. Now, there is lots of rain in the forecast for the coming week. On Second Thought checked in with onion farmer Aries Haygood of A&M Farms in Lyons, Georgia, to hear about the issues impacting farmers.


New data from the American Cancer Society show breast cancer as the number one form of cancer-related death for African American women in Georgia. Principal scientist from the American Caner Society, Carol Desantis, and director of cancer health equity at Morehouse School of Medicine, Dr. Brian Rivers, delve into the reality behind the numbers.


Lynn Savarese

Pat Mitchell has been at the forefront of three media revolutions. She was among the first women reporters and anchors for national television news, a big player in the rise of cable news as president of CNN productions, and the first female CEO and president of PBS during a time when digital media was changing how people consume information.


Pat Mitchell has long been an advocate for women and girls in television. Mitchell’s new biography tells how she advocated for herself as well. She is the former CEO of PBS and the co-founder of TedWomen. She joined On Second Thought to discuss her new book, Becoming a Dangerous Woman: Embracing Risk to Change the World.


This week held playoffs for both the Braves and Atlanta United, but for the fans it is not only about wins and losses. On Second Thought delves into the psychology of Atlanta fandom with psychiatrist and researcher, Dr. Seth Norrholm.


Truth The Creator

Music festivals have become vehicles for building real world community and identity in an age when so much communication takes place online.

Afropunk music festival originated in Brooklyn as a fusion of the music and cultural heritage of the African diaspora and the raw “do it yourself” ethic of punk.


Afropunk is a well-known music festival produced by black artists. It is an international festival, but it will be in Atlanta this weekend. Afropunk goes beyond just entertainment. Its "Solution Sessions" are an effort to address and tackle ongoing issues in the black community. On Second Thought speaks to Ashleigh Shackelford, Bridget Todd and Yves Jeffcoat, three of the featured speakers to hear their messages.


Little Shop of Stories is bringing best-selling New York Times author Jason Reynolds to Decatur at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Parish on Thursday, Oct. 10 at 7 p.m.  Hear how Reynolds inspires young readers with contemporary stories that deal with real-world issues.


Sr. Helen Prejean is one of the most powerful advocates today for abolishing the death penalty. Her book, Dead Man Walking, has become a movie and an opera. Hear Sr. Helen’s story firsthand.


Premiering tonight, Retro Report on PBS questions the premise that the modern American political divide is a new one. The series explores the historical origins of issues and ideas that continue to replay in our headlines and culture today. On Second Thought got a preview of the series with the hosts, Masud Olafani and former OST host Celeste Headlee. 

Retro Report premieres tonight at 9 p.m. on Georgia Public Broadcasting Television. 


Afropunk

Beverly 'Guitar' Watkins Tatum died earlier this week. She was 80 years old. 

Her name might not ring a bell, which is probably why a magazine writer once called her "the greatest living blues guitar artist no one has ever heard of." 


GPB

Boudleaux and Felice Bryant had a deep impact in Nashville, with notable hits like "Bye Bye Love" and “All I Have to Do Is Dream.” Their music has been recorded by artists like The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton and Simon & Garfunkel.

The hit-making couple is the subject of a new exhibit at The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn.


If music is a universal language, then OneBeat has diplomacy down. It’s a group of 25 emerging musicians from around the world who collaborate on writing, producing and performing original music. They also tour select cities. A few of the members, Farid Ghannam, a singer, Ming Qi, a synthesist, Rodney Barretto, a percussionist and Free Feral, a string player and composer, stopped by the studio to talk to On Second Thought.


pexels.com

For more than a century, Georgia cotton farmers helped grow the American economy and the garment industry. The clothing industry has evolved many times over since then — now, it’s easy to pop into a store and walk out with a $5 t-shirt, most likely synthetic and made outside of Georgia and even the United States.

But after decades of increasingly cheap, “fast” fashion, there are signs of change. Sustainable fashion was featured on some catwalks for Spring 2020 collections, and fast fashion giant Forever 21 filed for bankruptcy earlier this week. A growing consumer movement is re-evaluating the social and environmental impacts of the global clothing trade.


Anotonio Johnson is a photographer and among the contributors for Pop-Up Zine Atlanta.  Johnson's project, You Next, aims to capture the sense of community and transformative power of the black barbershop across America.


Topic.com

The birding community tends toward the older, white, and wealthier demographic. But that hasn’t stopped the young, Black, and gifted Jason Ward from keeping his eyes to the sky.

Ward hosts the YouTube series, “Birds of North America” and is an apprentice with the Atlanta Audubon Society. He’s spreading his passion for birding far and wide — and particularly to communities of color.


Pexels.com

The challenge of finding the right balance of independence and attentive care for long-term senior living can be challenging – even gut-wrenching – for families. And when it comes to private pay senior care, costs can be incredibly expensive.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigative reporter Carrie Teegardin has spent a year looking for what families won’t see on tours of more than 400 private pay senior care facilities in Georgia.  Her investigation found hundreds of safety violations, incidents of physical abuse, and assaults to dignity that often go unreported.


An Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigative series has uncovered a chilling reality at some senior care facilities. Get the story from the AJC reporter, Carrie Teegardin.


Senator David Perdue has a new plan to create a clearinghouse of information to help schools enhance security, and Senator Isakson has a new bill that would fund research of mass violence at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Join the director of Georgia State University’s Center for School Safety, School Climate and Classroom Management, Kristen Varjas, and Executive Director of Safe Havens International, Michael Dorn, for a discussion of the plans and the issues that surround them.


“A Night of Georgia Music” continues a collaboration between Mike Mills, bassist songwriter and co-founder of R.E.M.; Chuck Leavell, former member of The Allman Brothers Band, now the music director and keyboardist for The Rolling Stones; and Robert McDuffie, violinist and founder of the Robert McDuffie Center for Strings at Mercer University.

They will be performing at the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra on Sept. 29, but first they stopped by On Second Thought.


Caitlyn Collins is a sociologist and author of "Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving."  Collins looks into “Work/Family Justice” for parents, especially as more and more women become the breadwinners of their families.  Her studies show that mothers in the United States are the most stressed of comparable western cultures and speak more about not having enough time to be with their children. Unlike many European countries, such as Sweden, the United States does not have a national support system for mothers. Collins preveiws her research into societal trends and policy with On Second Thought before her speech at the University of Georgia.


Pexels.com

When Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide last month in a New York Corrections Facility, questions about the state of mental healthcare in America’s prisons briefly dominated the national news.

But suicides in jails and prisons are becoming more and more commonplace – especially in Georgia.  The state has one of the highest rates of inmate suicide in the nation, nearly double the national average.


Suicides are on the rise in jails and prisons, and Georgia has one of the highest rates of inmate suicides in the nation — nearly double the national average. On Second Thought explores the circumstances effecting the numbers.

Atlanta-based freelance reporter Max Blau reported in The Macon Telegraph last month. He spoke to state officials, family members and dug into public records data. He joins On Second Thought to discuss his findings on prison suicides.


Vaping is under fire after a series of deaths and crackdowns on flavors, said to attract children to smoking. The new vaping flavors contain nicotine salts, which deliver nicotine more quickly through the body, increasing the likelihood of addiction. The effects of electronic cigarettes on school-age children have been reported as the cause of eight deaths so far.  On Second Thought speaks with Dean of GSU’s College of Public Health, Michael Eriksen, on the latest news and developments.


The Youth Climate Strike will take place Friday in Georgia, other U.S. states and about 150 countries. High school and college students are skipping class to demand action on climate change, and they are timing the strike for right before Monday’s UN Climate Action Summit. On Second Thought hears from Andrea Manning and Zeena Abdulkarim, two of the Atlanta organizers and Dr. Kim Cobb, a climate science professor.


wikimedia.org

Before Outkast, Goodie Mobb and T.I. burst out of Georgia, there was Blind Willie McTell and James Brown.  Before Trisha Yearwood, Alan Jackson and Jason Aldean stepped onto the country music scene, Brenda Lee and Chet Atkins were changing the sound of country music altogether.

What unifies those musical giants? Georgia. On Second Thought embarked on an audio tour of the dense and diverse musical roots of Georgia, from Ma Rainey and the Skillet Lickers to Emmett Miller and Otis Redding.


@69.mov
Mario Chui / mariochui.net

From Vincent Van Gogh to Charli XCX, many accomplished artists are thought to have synesthesia, or the blending of two or more senses. Atlanta-based sensory artist Siana Altiise also has synesthesia, and she feels compelled to use her unique perspective to create musical experiences meant to relax people.

Siana joined On Second Thought to share how she builds her meditative tracks based on both the psychology of attention and her personal experiences with synesthesia. 


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