Pria Mahadevan

Producer, On Second Thought

Pria is a producer for GPB's program, On Second Thought.

Pria is passionate about using local journalism as a way to strengthen communities. She got her start in radio through KALW's Audio Academy program in San Francisco, but she has a diverse set of professional experiences outside of journalism. She studied cognitive neuroscience and Spanish at Washington University in St. Louis, and later worked as a financial consultant in Boston and taught English at a university in Brazil on a Fulbright scholarship.

After spending years exploring a variety of fields she finds interesting, Pria is thrilled to have found a career that lets her continue to explore new ideas every day. She has always loved storytelling, and she is excited that every day at GPB involves new ideas and challenges. She's eager to bring new voices to airwaves across Georgia. 

Ways to Connect

Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

On Second Thought aired a special broadcast about the story of how Richard Jewell's life changed when The Atlanta-Journal Constitution published his name as the primary suspect in the 1996 bombings at Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park.

In that audio documentary, we learn about how Jewell's legal team sued The Atlanta-Journal Constitution — along with other news organizations — for defamation. The AJC fought the suit, and eventually won. Now, the paper is disputing how it is being portrayed in the film Richard Jewell, which hit theaters Friday.


When Atlanta hosted the 1996 Olympics, terror struck. In the rush for justice, the wrong man was presumed guilty. “Mistaken: The Real Story of Richard Jewell” follows Jewell’s descent from hero to villain in the court of public opinion. Hear this On Second Thought special broadcast featuring interviews with Kent Alexander, U.S. Attorney for the northern district of Georgia at the time of the 1996 Olympics, journalist, Kevin Salwen and Tom Johnson, former head of CNN.


Greg Gibson / AP Photo

In the late 1990’s and early 2000’s, the name Richard Jewell became a newsroom watchword — a code for false accusations and warnings against rushing to judgment when reporting on criminal investigations.

 

When a bomb went off at Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta during the 1996 Olympic Games, Richard Jewell, a security guard hired to man the games, discovered the bomb and helped clear the area. He was initially hailed as a hero. But the tides quickly turned on Jewell, when the FBI and the media together began to circle Jewell as the primary suspect for the bombing.

 

 

 


 

 

John Harrell / AP

Clint Eastwood’s film Richard Jewell is out and, as a piece that is critical of journalists, it generated discussion before the first ticket was even sold. 

Like Eastwood’s film, “Mistaken: The Real Story of Richard Jewell” follows Jewell’s descent from hero to villain in the court of public opinion. And, while "Mistaken" diverges from Eastwood’s film in a number of ways, it is also an invitation to think critically about the role of journalism and how we the public consume it.

 

 

 

 

Konstantin Lazorkin / Creative Commons

People struggling with treatment-resistant PTSD may soon have a new course of care: MDMA. When used alongside psychotherapy, the synthetic substance in the drug more commonly known as ecstasy or molly is currently in phase three clinical trials. It’s even been given “breakthrough designation” by the FDA, a status reserved for treatments with significant potential to improve patient outcomes.

But MDMA isn’t the only kind of party drug experiencing interest for therapeutic potential. Psilocybin, the active ingredient in "magic mushrooms", is being evaluated for its potential in alleviating depression. Guided ayahuasca trips are a growing trend, especially amongst Brooklyn and Silicon Valley elites.


Atlanta Judge Christopher Portis recently launched a court program to help homeless defendats in Atlanta. Hear how the new initiative aims to help people get off the streets and navigate the court system.


Comedian Judah Friedlander is probably best known for his role as Frank Rossitano on NBC’s 30 Rock, but his new stand-up series Judah Friedlander: Future President takes a satirical look at America and its complicated place on the world stage. He performed in Atlanta a few weeks ago and joins On Second Thought to share his approach to stand-up.


It seemed like winter came early this year with record low temperatures dipping below the 20s. As the cold weather continues, cozy up with a blanket, warm cup of tea and a book.

On Second Thought is joined by three of Georgia’s booksellers, Janet Geddis owner of Avid Bookshop in Athens, Annie Jones owner of The Bookshelf in Thomasville and Charles Robinson co-owner of Eagle Eye Book Shop in Atlanta. They help choose which books to crack open this holiday season.


The impeachment proceedings continue in the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday.  Today, On Second Thought gets the perspective of two Georgia experts pertaining to the possible effects of the hearing. Author, lawyer and Pro Hac Judge to the City of Atlanta Municipal Court, Parag Shah, clarifies hearsay and its admission during the hearings. 


Dee Dee Hibbler now consults for the Dekalb County film commission after being an instrumental figure in establishing Atlanta as the hip-hop capital of the south. Hibbler is also known as “Peaches” most commonly associated with Outkast and Dungeon Family fame. She joins On Second Thought to talk about her work with some of the most notable names in hip-hop. 


Georgia’s foster care system is in crisis with the number of kids in state custody rising significantly. To getter a better understanding of the strain on the system, On Second Thought spoke with Samantha Max, former health reporter for The Telegraph in Macon and current reporter for Nashville Public Radio. Also joining the conversation is foster parent and founder of Never Too Late group home, Dr. John DeGarmo.


Gnats don’t read maps, but the bugs do seem hesitant to cross an unseen, geographic boundary in Georgia. Learn about the disparities north and south of the "gnat line" from Tales from the Gnat Line author and longtime state lawmaker Larry Walker.


New data from the Associated Press reveal more than a thousand failing dams in the U.S. that could have catastrophic consequences if they gave out. Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Grant Blankenship analyzed the information and learned Georgia is one of the most at-risk states. Find out which dams could cause the most damage for surrounding communities.


Dr. Vonda Wright spreads the word on the potential for injury in esports. Learn the similarities between traditional and digital sports, and how Dr. Wright teaches young players how to participate safely.


Stephen Kelleghan

In her new memoir, Samantha Power writes about the “X test.” As she describes it, “in trying for Y, the most I accomplish is X.” In other words, even if “Y” is likely to fail, what “X” can be learned along the way?

Power has experienced some of those failures and made some bold moves in her life. Some weren’t up to her, like moving from Ireland to the U.S. at the age of 9. As a young adult, she jumped into the fray as a reporter during The Balkan Wars, later writing a Pulitzer Prize-winning book that took the American government to task for failing to stop genocides around the world. She would later become Ambassador to the U.N. under President Obama.


Pexels.com

The challenge of finding the right balance of independence and attentive care for long-term senior living can be challenging – even gut-wrenching – for families. And when it comes to private pay senior care, costs can be incredibly expensive.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigative reporter Carrie Teegardin has spent a year looking for what families won’t see on tours of more than 400 private pay senior care facilities in Georgia.  Her investigation found hundreds of safety violations, incidents of physical abuse, and assaults to dignity that often go unreported. GPB TV will air a special on the investigation on Nov. 14 at 7 p.m. called Unprotected: Georgia's Broken Senior Care Industry. 

 


Abrams Press

On Tuesday, July 30, 1996, Richard Jewell was praised as a hero on NBC’s Today Show. The security guard hired for the Summer Olympics in Atlanta spotted a suspicious knapsack at Centennial Olympic Park, where tens of thousands of visitors gathered.

Two people died and 111 were injured when the bomb inside the knapsack exploded. Jewell’s vigilance and the evacuation that followed likely saved hundreds of lives. But less than 12 hours after chatting with Katie Couric, Jewell was being questioned by the FBI as the primary suspect in that bombing.


Health and Human Services Chair Sharon Cooper says she will introduce legislation to improve staffing and oversight of senior care facilities after an explosive investigation from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Hear our conversation with Carrie Teegardin, one of the reporters behind the story.


Skiff Mountain Films

There are more than two million people incarcerated in the United States. Over two-thirds of them lack a high school diploma, and less than 13% have attended college.

But where nearly half of all formerly incarcerated people return to prison within three years, the students working towards associates and bachelor’s degrees through the Bard Prison Initiative, or BPI, have a recidivism rate of just 4%.


Milkweed Editions

Each year, The Georgia Writers Hall of Fame inducts new members to its growing list of authors who have made significant literary contributions to the state. This year’s inductees – John T. Edge, A. E. Stallings, and Julia Collier Harris – will all be celebrated at the University of Georgia Special Collections Library in Athens on Nov. 17.

Author Janisse Ray was inducted to the Georgia Writers Hall of Fame in 2015. Her expansive body of creative works range from nonfiction to poetry, and her memoir, Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, came out with its 15th anniversary edition last year.


Governor Kemp recently announced his proposals for Medicaid waivers for the state. To help breakdown what the proposals could mean for your pocketbook, On Second Thought was joined by Andy Miller from Georgia Health News and Ariel Hart from the Atlanta Journal Constitution.


President Trump comes to Georgia this week. On Second Thought speaks to organizers and members of the black GOP about their efforts in recruiting other black voters. Kaaryn Walker from the Black Conservatives for Truth and Leo Smith from the Minority Engagement Specialist for the GOP join the show.


A case study of three metro Atlanta cities looked into the increase of tickets and fees to bolster municipal revenue - or what The Institute for Justice calls “taxation by citation.”  On Second Thought learns more from Senior Research Analyst Jennifer McDonald.


Daryn Kagan covered everything from wars to the red carpet at CNN. Now, she chases down positive news stories. She joined On Second Thought to unpack some uplifting news stories to head into the weekend.


BreeAnne Clowdus

For a short time, Edgar Allan Poe is haunting the halls of a fabled Atlanta home. 'The Edgar Allan Poe Experience’ at the Wren’s Nest is an immersive theatrical production evoking the final days of Poe’s life, when he’s said to have wandered the streets in a haggard state, crying out the name of a man no one could ever identify.

The ‘choose-your-own-adventure’-style production taps into scenarios inspired by Poe classics like The Raven, The Fall of the House of Usher, The Tell-Tale Heart, and The Mask Of The Red Death.


Meet scream researcher Harold Gouzoules, an Emory psychologist, and hear how goats yell, frogs screech and humans use screams as nonverbal forms of critical communication. 


pexels.com

More than half of all homeless youth in Atlanta have experienced some form of human trafficking. The ‘Atlanta Youth Count’ – a Georgia State University study – surveyed over 500 young people who are homeless on everything from personal demographic information to childhood trauma to their relationships with their peers. 

The new study paints a harrowing – and, at times, hopeful – picture of the young people living on Atlanta’s streets.


Halloween week might be a time for imaging run-down, decrepit buildings, but they don’t scare photographer Jeff Hagerman. Having ventured inside these abandonded beauties with a camera, a flashlight and some gloves – Herman's resulting images now comprise his second book. Find out what he sees behind the closed doors you may pass on your daily commute.

Fugees Family, Inc.

When Luma Mufleh moved from Jordan to the United States in 1994 to attend Smith College, she didn’t imagine she’d ever be running a full-fledged school for refugees. But today, she’s founder of Fugees Academy in Clarkston, a school specifically tailored for the refugee population that uses soccer and a unique curriculum to help students adjust to life in the United States.

It has a 100% graduation and college acceptance rate, and it was recently named the “Nicest Place in Georgia” for 2019 by Reader’s Digest. Mufleh joined On Second Thought to discuss her journey building educational opportunities for refugee children.


As speculation spreads over the potential mid-season replacement of Atlanta Falcons coach Dan Quinn, we get an update on all things happening in Atlanta Sports. On Second Thought speaks with Jon Nelson, host and correspondent for GPB’s Football Friday, and Taylor Gantt, GPB’s Morning Edition producer to hear about the Atlanta Falcons, Hawks and Atlanta United.


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