Patricia Murphy

Year started with KUOW: 2000

Patricia Murphy is a feature reporter for KUOW. Patricia is part of two collaborative projects focusing on military and veterans.  The American Homefront Project is a partnership between public radio stations KUOW, WUNC, KPCC and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Back at Base is a collaboration between National Public Radio and seven member stations including KUOW.  

Patricia is an award-winning radio journalist. Prior to covering veterans and military affairs she reported on social issues and criminal justice. Patricia’s first job in radio news was at WBUR Boston in 1994. She’s worked at KUOW since 2000.

Patricia’s series “Less than Honorable,” investigated how the military handles more than 3,000 sexual assault cases each year. Her 2011 collaboration with the Seattle Times, “The Weight of War,” looked at heavy loads carried by troops and the increase in chronic orthopedic injuries as a result; the series won a national award for Excellence in Health Care Journalism from the Association of Healthcare Journalists. She also received a national Edward R. Murrow Award for a documentary on IV drug use and has had her work recognized with awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In 2012, Patricia was inducted into the Dart Society, a network of journalists who cover trauma, conflict and social injustice.

Patricia holds a B.A. from Emerson College in Boston.

(L-R) Rep. David Clark (R-Buford), Hailie Massey, Laurie Wilson, Rep. Jeff Jones (R-Brunswick)
GPB

In 2012, Hailie Massey was raped in her home by a 33-year-old traveling evangelist while her parents slept.  She was 14 years old. 

Even though her attacker was arrested and charged in 2013, his trial was continuously delayed because of the legislative commitments of his attorney, Georgia House Speaker David Ralston. Under Georgia’s “legislative leave” law at the time, state legislators could request a delay in court proceedings if their own legislative duties meant they had a scheduling conflict.  

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Terry England (R-Auburn)
GPB

A key House committee voted Tuesday to reject many of the steep cuts Gov. Brian Kemp had requested for the current budget year, capping off a hectic stretch of adjournment, committee hearings and line-by-line budget negotiations.

The House Appropriations Committee gaveled in at 7 a.m. to begin considering Kemp’s recommended changes to the current state budget, which the governor asked to be cut by roughly $200 million. Committee members voted unanimously to add back full, or at least partial funding, for many of their key priorities including money for rural health, behavioral health and criminal justice reform. 

The Veterans Administration got $2.5 billion to add more doctors, nurses and other staff. An NPR investigation finds that total staff didn't rise much more than it might have without that money. We examine reasons why it's hard to bring new medical personnel into the VA, including a cumbersome hiring process.

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