Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

Lulu Garcia-Navarro is the host of Weekend Edition Sunday and one of the hosts of NPR's morning news podcast Up First. She is infamous in the IT department of NPR for losing laptops to bullets, hurricanes, and bomb blasts.

Before joining the Sunday morning team, she served as an NPR correspondent based in Brazil, Israel, Mexico, and Iraq. She was one of the first reporters to enter Libya after the 2011 Arab Spring uprising began and spent months painting a deep and vivid portrait of a country at war. Often at great personal risk, Garcia-Navarro captured history in the making with stunning insight, courage, and humanity.

For her work covering the Arab Spring, Garcia-Navarro was awarded a 2011 George Foster Peabody Award, a Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club, an Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and the Alliance for Women and the Media's Gracie Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement. She contributed to NPR News reporting on Iraq, which was recognized with a 2005 Peabody Award and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton. She has also won awards for her work on migration in Mexico and the Amazon in Brazil.

Since joining Weekend Edition Sunday, Garcia-Navarro and her team have also received a Gracie for their coverage of the #MeToo movement. She's hard at work making sure Weekend Edition brings in the voices of those who will surprise, delight, and move you, wherever they might be found.

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. She was posted for the AP to Iraq before the U.S.-led invasion, where she stayed covering the conflict.

Garcia-Navarro holds a Bachelor of Science degree in international relations from Georgetown University and an Master of Arts degree in journalism from City University in London.

Kashmir Hill wanted Amazon out of her life, completely.

It was the first week of a six-week experiment in living without tech giants. She had a virtual private network, or VPN, that would keep her devices walled off from any Amazon product. She would avoid Whole Foods and power down her Kindles.

But she had a problem. A small, chipper problem.

Alexa.

She couldn't connect her Amazon Echo to the VPN. But if she just unplugged the smart speaker, someone, like her husband, might forget and plug it back in.

Three years ago, Leah Nobel set out to capture the diversity of human experience and set it to music. After interviewing 100 people in public spaces like the YMCA and coffee shops and through social media, Nobel used these shared stories of joys and vulnerabilities to create her latest album, Running in Borrowed Shoes.

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Children's literature handed out some of its biggest awards this past week. And among those celebrating are not one, not two but three Latina authors.

"Schizophrenia terrifies."

Those are the first two words of The Collected Schizophrenias, Esmé Weijun Wang's new book — part memoir, part scientific chronicle of her journey towards a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder.

In the latest social media craze, people are sharing photos comparing how they looked 10 years ago with how they look today. Dubbed the "10-Year Challenge," the viral fad has attracted everyone from celebrities like Mariah Carey and Justin Baldoni, to environmentalists seeking to highlight the impacts of climate change.

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On his latest album, Outer Peace, Chaz Bear, otherwise known as Toro y Moi, is navigating the spaces of adulthood, technology, genre and identity.

Having recently changed his last name from Bundick to Bear, the artist is finding ways to not only redefine himself, but also his music.

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For more reaction, we are joined now by Greisa Martinez Rosas. She's with United We Dream, a DACA advocacy organization. And she's a DACA recipient herself.

Good morning.

GREISA MARTINEZ ROSAS: Buenas Dias. Good morning.

Bridal shop co-owner Laura Allen didn't think it was a big deal when she had the idea to put a window display mannequin in a wheelchair.

The mannequin, affectionately named Prunella, sits in one of the two storefront displays for The White Collection, a small bridal shop in Portishead, England. Prunella wears a beautiful white wedding dress with a flowery boat neckline and a fabulous pair of Louboutin shoes.

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Let's face it. Email can be exhausting - the notification, the replies, the dreaded reply-alls and so much spam. Here's how a couple of people around NPR deal with their inboxes.

In April 2017, it was marketed as the party of a lifetime. The Fyre Music Festival was billed as a two-weekend, immersive experience in paradise where festival goers would enjoy top musical acts, party with supermodels and stay in lux accommodations on a private island in The Bahamas once owned by Pablo Escobar.

This story is part of our ongoing "Missed Connections" series, and it begins at Southridge High School in Beaverton, Ore.

Greg McKelvey says the day he crossed paths with police officer Andrew Halbert eight years ago left him deeply affected. This month, McKelvey reflected on the incident in a Twitter thread that went viral.

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Ten years ago this past week, Bernie Madoff was arrested.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: The arrest of Wall Street legend Bernard Madoff has clients panicked that their wealth may be gone.

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In 2009, Steve Burrows' mom, Judie, went in for hip replacement surgery. She came out with brain damage and mobility issues after a weeks-long coma that would change her and her family's life.

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(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HO HO HO")

SIA: (Singing) Ho, ho, ho. Bring a bottle of rum...

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The daylight is dwindling away. The solstice arrives on Friday. So let's listen to some warming songs from Eastern Europe that celebrate the season upon us.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MOMCI KOLEDARCI")

KITKA WOMEN'S VOCAL ENSEMBLE: (Singing in Bulgarian).

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The new Netflix comedy Dumplin' is all about Dolly Parton. But she's not in it. And that was deliberate. Instead, Dolly did what Dolly does best — write and sing songs for the movie.

The film follows a young girl, Willowdean (Danielle Macdonald), who lacks confidence, but after being inspired by Parton's music, participates in a beauty pageant in Clover City, Tx., despite her mom's objections. That mom is played by Jennifer Aniston, who also co-produced the film and helped get Parton on board.

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Holiday home decorations can be store-bought or homemade, handed down in a family from generation to generation. But what about from one homeowner to another?

ALISON LAPOINTE: When we were walking through the house for the inspection...

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Wildfires, hurricanes - climate change is making natural disasters more frequent and more fierce.

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Roll over Spot, Buddy and Rover. Say hello to Cardi B, Harry and Groot! These are just some of 2018's popular names for dogs.

Kate Jaffe is a dog name curator for Rover, the dog and cat service provider. She says that this year pop culture dog name names are in.

"We saw the royal wedding surging as inspiration for dog names," she says. "In fact, dogs named Harry and Meghan were both up about 130 percent this year."

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