Leah Fleming

Morning Edition Host

Leah Fleming is an award-winning radio host and correspondent.

You can hear her greet you to each weekday morning on 88.5 GPB Atlanta’s Morning Edition from NPR News.

Leah is a familiar voice on public radio having hosted morning and afternoon programming in Atlanta, Albany, New York, Jacksonville and Miami, Florida.

Leah says her passion for diversity in public radio is what keeps her in the genre.  Her goal for Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Morning Edition is to offer the listener a unique experience of news, culture and trends of interest to African Americans and other diverse groups in the greater Atlanta area.  She believes that listeners, no matter what their ethnic make-up, find value in content that explores and celebrates all cultures.   

Leah joined GPB in 2012 following six years at WLRN-Miami Herald News, in Miami, where she served as All Things Considered anchor before being named deputy news director.

Prior to her time in South Florida, Leah worked as Morning Edition host at WABE Public Radio in Atlanta, Georgia. There she was acknowledged for her work including an award from the National Association of Black Journalists for her interview with professional boxer Laila Ali.

Leah has also worked at NPR in Washington, DC as a producer and served as a mentor with NPR’s Next Generation project.

Raised in New York, Leah holds a Master of Science degree in communication arts.

Ways to Connect

GPB: Taylor Gantt

A new report by the FBI shows that violence against the LGBT community is on the rise.

The agency found that one out of every six hate crimes last year was based on sexual orientation.

And for transgender people living in the South, the statistics are even more grim.

According to the Human Right’s Campaign, 60 percent of violent incidents against transgender people happen in the South.

That includes four deaths this year in Georgia.

  • UGA advances to the College Football Playoff for the first time in school history
  • Atlanta's mayoral candidates prepare for tomorrow's election
  • Keisha Lance Bottoms receives support from senators Cory Booker and Kamala Harris
  • 20 new Bitcoin ATM's are now operational throughout in Atlanta and Athens

In today's headlines:

  • World AIDS Day 2017 brings more awareness to Atlanta's HIV problem
  • UGA and Auburn prepare to face off in Saturday's SEC championship game
  • Kamala Harris travels to Atlanta to support Mary Norwood in next week's mayoral election

In today's headlines:

  • Cathy Woolard endorses Mary Norwood in Atlanta's mayoral race
  • Several Georgia artists are nominated for the 2018 Grammy Awards
  • NSA leaker Reality Winner is denied bail

Today's headlines include:

  • Atlanta's mayoral candidates discuss race and affordability in a GPB debate.
  • Betsy DeVos visits GSU to discuss college costs with students
  • Thousands of banks team up to sue Atlanta based Equifax

In today's headlines:

  • Shirley Franklin endorses Mary Norwood in the Atlanta mayoral race
  • The candidates face off in two debates, including a 2 p.m. discussion on GPB's "Political Rewind"
  • #GivingTuesday raises hundreds of thousands of dollars for charity

In today's headlines:

  • UGA looks ahead to a rematch against Auburn in the SEC Championship Game
  • Early voting starts today for runoffs across the state
  • Shoppers are searching for deals during Cyber Monday

The 'Sweet Auburn' Neighborhood in Atlanta

As cities like Atlanta grapple with Confederate history and what to do with symbols like America’s largest Confederate memorial atop Stone Mountain, there’s a push to recognize places of cultural significance for African-Americans.

The National Trust, in partnership with The Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation and Open Society Foundation, announced the creation of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund.  

Today's headlines include:

  • The Falcons get back in playoff position after beating Seattle on Monday Night Football
  • Atlanta prepares to make key decisions on Confederate monuments and streets
  • Mayoral candidate Mary Norwood releases nine years worth of tax returns
  • Atlanta is set to receive a number of new police officers thanks to the DOJ

In today's headlines:

  • Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance Bottoms square off in their first debate
  • A bump stock ban in Georgia could be on the horizon
  • Preparations for Monday's implosion of the Georgia Dome are moving forward

FLICKR

Today's headlines include:

  • Atlanta's first mayoral runoff debate between Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance-Bottoms
  • A recount is scheduled for Michael Julien Bond's city council seat
  • An event in Lawrenceville invites white people to "Come Meet A Black Person"
  • Mercedes Benz Stadium is recognized as one of the world's most sustainable venues
     

FACEBOOK

For over a century, baseball has been known as America’s pastime.

But not everyone has been able to play organized baseball, especially those with special needs.

That’s where the Alternative Baseball Organization wants to make a difference.

It’s a nonprofit program for teens and adults with autism and special needs who want to showcase their talents on the baseball diamond.

MGR Foundation

 

Studies suggest U.S.-born and foreign-born black donors give about $12 billion to U.S. charities and $11 billion overseas.

 

Altogether, the U.S. black giving economy is about $23 billion each year.

 

Giving Back: The Soul of Philanthropy is a traveling exhibit that has just opened in Atlanta at The Auburn Avenue Research Library.

 

Canine Cellmates

 

 

Over the summer, bikers, walkers and runners were treated to some art as they enjoyed Atlanta’s Beltine.  

Included in the display was a group of photos of black men incarcerated at the Fulton County jail.

The four photos feature men in their prison jumpsuits posing with dogs that they trained as part of the Canine Cellmates program.

@PBS

Sports has long been known as the great unifier. But in the NFL, this season feels different.  

Saporta Report

 

For more than forty years, the city of Atlanta has been led by an African-American mayor.

 

Maynard Jackson started the trend in 1974, becoming the first black mayor elected in a major southern city.

The man who preceded Jackson was Sam Massell, who made history of his own in 1970 when he became the first Jewish mayor of Atlanta.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Every day in the United States 91 people die of opioid overdose. That includes prescription opiates and heroin. Over a year, that’s more than ten times the number of people who died on 9/11. On today’s “On Second Thought,” we’re going to hear from some of the people struggling with addiction, those who offer help, and communities caught in the middle.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Imagine that you haven't eaten in several days. What would you be thinking about? Most likely, food would be on your mind!

The craving for sustenance that you would feel is actually the brain’s mechanism that drives you to survive

That's how many people describe what its like to be addicted to opiates.

@jmartNYT

The race for governor in Georgia is well underway.

 

Candidates from both parties are preparing for the 2018 election to replace Governor Nathan Deal.

YOUTUBE

Today's Music Minute highlights a middle Georgia blues legend who inspired a number of influential artists over the years.

You’re listening to "Statesboro Blues" by Blind Willie McTell, who was born in Thomson, Georgia in 1898.

Saturday will be the 58th anniversary of his death in 1959.

WIKIPEDIA COMMONS

Today’s Music Minute features singer Edward Patten, who was born on this day in Atlanta in 1939.

BET

Today’s Music Minute recognizes a rapper who created one of the biggest viral sensations of all time.

On this day in 1990, DeAndre Cortez Way, better known as Soulja Boy, was born.

 

The Atlanta based rapper is best known for his 2007 hit "Crank That Soulja Boy,” which has nearly 300 million views on YouTube .

The smash hit single even earned the rapper a Grammy nomination in 2008.

Despite his early success, Soulja Boy hasn’t been able to find a hit that equaled his first big breakthrough.

Dreamhack Atlanta

The world’s largest video game festival is coming to Atlanta this weekend.

From Friday to Sunday, Dreamhack takes over the Georgia World Congress Center.

WME

If you attend a church service in Atlanta on any given Sunday you may have heard this song: "Break Every Chain."

 

The woman behind this Billboard chart-topping song is Grammy Award winning gospel singer Tasha Cobbs.  

On this day in 1981, Cobbs was born in Jesup, Georgia.

The singer, who was the most streamed gospel artist of 2016, has attracted the attention of another entertainer by the name of Onika Maraj, better known as Nicki Minaj.

Today’s Music Minute features a jazz singer and actress who spent her formative years in Georgia.

Lena Horne was born on this day in 1917. This is the theme song from her 1943 movie, "Stormy Weather."

Although she started in New York City, Horne spent much of her childhood in Fort Valley and Atlanta.

During her induction into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame in 1991, she told the Telegraph that participating in a youth choir in Macon was her start in singing.

thedoctorweighsin.com

A nationwide report measuring child wellness has ranked Georgia near the bottom.

 

According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Kids Count report, Georgia is ranked forty-second in the country.

 

 

We dissect the numbers with Rebecca Rice, the Georgia Kids Count Manager for the Georgia Family Connection Partnership.

 

She tells us how Georgia has improved since last year's rankings and where the state is still coming up short.

 

Today is World Refugee Day, a day recognized by the United Nations in 2001.

 

Resettling in a new land can be difficult for refugee families, so one business in Georgia is trying to make things a little easier.

 

Amplio Recruiting is following through on a pledge to source 100 percent of their talent from the refugee population.

 

We spoke with refugee turned employee Sana Hajizadeh.

GPB

For generations, black women have gathered together to share insights, wisdom, and to encourage one another.

 

Now, Georgia Public Broadcasting wants to bring those candid conversations to TV with a new talk show called "A Seat at the Table."

www.arlington-tx.gov

There’s a water crisis going on in DeKalb County. It’s not a problem of what’s in the water, but what it's costing residents.

 

 

Citizens of DeKalb County have been dealing with exorbitant and incorrect water bills for years.

 

AID Atlanta, the state’s largest HIV/AIDS service organization, has filed a lawsuit against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

 

The group claims the federal agency’s decision to defund it threatens the delivery of services to the communities most at risk of getting the deadly virus: young, black, gay and bisexual men.

We sit down with Nicole Roebuck, the executive director of AID Atlanta, to talk about the lawsuit, infection rates in Atlanta, and lingering stigmas associated with the virus.

Pages