Leah Fleming

Morning Edition Host

Leah Fleming is an award-winning radio host and correspondent.

You can hear her greet you to each weekday morning on 88.5 GPB Atlanta’s Morning Edition from NPR News.

Leah is a familiar voice on public radio having hosted morning and afternoon programming in Atlanta, Albany, New York, Jacksonville and Miami, Florida.

Leah says her passion for diversity in public radio is what keeps her in the genre.  Her goal for Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Morning Edition is to offer the listener a unique experience of news, culture and trends of interest to African Americans and other diverse groups in the greater Atlanta area.  She believes that listeners, no matter what their ethnic make-up, find value in content that explores and celebrates all cultures.   

Leah joined GPB in 2012 following six years at WLRN-Miami Herald News, in Miami, where she served as All Things Considered anchor before being named deputy news director.

Prior to her time in South Florida, Leah worked as Morning Edition host at WABE Public Radio in Atlanta, Georgia. There she was acknowledged for her work including an award from the National Association of Black Journalists for her interview with professional boxer Laila Ali.

Leah has also worked at NPR in Washington, DC as a producer and served as a mentor with NPR’s Next Generation project.

Raised in New York, Leah holds a Master of Science degree in communication arts.

Ways to Connect

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced it would halt its Legal Orientation Program, which provides legal advice and information to detained immigrants. The DOJ has also suspended a telephone helpline. The Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) says this isn't the only obstacle immigrants face when it comes to legal assistance. In a new lawsuit, the SPLC claims federal immigration officials make it difficult for detainees to communicate with their attorneys. In the lawsuit, the Southern Poverty Law Center calls out two Georgia detention centers as part of the problem. SPLC legal director Lisa Graybill and immigration lawyer Hiba Ghalib talked with us about immigrants' access to legal assistance.  

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Since more than a million people demanded stronger gun control laws in the March for Our Lives, many local governments have proposed tougher restrictions on guns. 

 

But some communities, including a couple in Georgia, actually have laws requiring you to own a gun.

 

LaRaven Taylor / GPB

This week's Breakroom panel looked back at the week in news. Former NPR correspondent Kathy Lohr, film critic Stephen Brown, freelance writer Anjali Enjeti and "Greg's List" host Greg Williams chimed in on Mark Zuckerberg's congressional hearing, mass resignations at Atlanta's city hall and the controversial portrayals of Asian characters on shows such as "The Simpsons." 

Courtesy of "Blindspotting"

From Broadway to the big screen, actors Daveed Diggs and Rafael Casal are in Georgia for the Atlanta Film Festival. They both co-wrote and star in “Blindspotting,” a film that examines social issues like gentrification and police brutality through the eyes of of two men living in Oakland, California. 

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Saturday marks two months since a school shooting killed 17 students and educators in Parkland, Florida. Since then, we’ve heard public outrage transform into ever more urgent calls for reforms to the nation's gun laws. Antoinette Tuff knows first-hand what it’s like to come face-to-face with a school shooter: On Aug. 20, 2013, she was working at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy when a 20-year-old gunman entered with an AK-47 military assault rifle and 500 rounds of ammunition. Tuff talked the gunman down, and no one was injured or killed. She tells us whether teachers should be armed.

Saturday marks two months since a school shooting killed 17 students and educators in Parkland, Florida. Since then, we’ve heard public outrage transform into ever more urgent calls for reforms to the nation's gun laws. Antoinette Tuff knows first-hand what it’s like to come face-to-face with a school shooter: On Aug. 20, 2013, she was working at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy when a 20-year-old gunman entered with an AK-47 military assault rifle and 500 rounds of ammunition. Tuff talked the gunman down, and no one was injured or killed. She tells us whether teachers should be armed.

National Park Service

April 4, 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Martin Luther King Jr. Today, we paid tribute to King's legacy by talking to the people who knew him, portrayed him and were inspired by him. 

Associated Press

Wednesday, April 4, 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee.

So, in the last 50 years, how has the civil rights movement evolved, and where is it headed?

BIOGRAPHY.COM

Today, officials at the state capitol will honor the life of Civil Rights and labor activist Cesar Chavez, who was born on March 31st.

Chavez dedicated his life to improving conditions for hundreds of thousands of farm-workers, who suffered under poor working conditions and low wages.

As the co-founder of the National Farm Workers Association, Chavez was a fierce advocate for agricultural reform.

 

  •   Georgia may soon replace outdated voting machines
  •   Atlanta United sets another attendance record in home opener win
  •   HB 834 offers a way out for victims of family violence

@trapkinghumane

 

If you were to ask, “who is the Trap King of Atlanta," you’d probably get a few different responses, like Gucci Mane or T.I.

 

However, one man has already laid claim to that title. But instead of creating beats or writing lyrics, he’s trapping feral cats.

 

Sterling Davis is the man behind TrapKing Humane Cat Solutions.

 

  •   Repairs continue after Dekalb water pipe break
  •   Facebook announces new Data Center in Stanton Springs
  •   KSU student group launches lawsuit against the university

 

Starting this week, GPB is adding a new radio show to the morning lineup.

1A, which airs weekday mornings at 10,  is a show that tackles the most important stories in this country, while bringing context and insight from a number of diverse voices.

 

Joshua Johnson, who hosts the program, is one of those diverse voices.

 

He’s a seasoned journalist from south Florida, who formerly served as the Morning News host for KQED in San Francisco.  

 

  •   Immigration activists rally at the state capitol
  •   Legislators tackle a number of issues on Crossover Day
  •   The search continues for a missing CDC employee

In today's news:

-Lt. Governor Casey Cagle threatens Delta over NRA snub

-Georgia legislature passes changes to bail bond process

-Braves legend Chipper Jones speaks out on gun control

jimadams.farm

 

In 2015, The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations reported that nearly 20 percent of the world’s food is grown on urban farms.

Georgia has long been known as an agricultural power in rural areas.

 

But now, metro Atlanta is seeing more efforts to grow food inside city limits.

Chuck Meadows is one of the people behind this push.  

  • State lawmakers vote on Eagles Landing separation from Stockbridge
  • House passes gun legislation to prohibit sales or trades with felons
  • Atlanta native sets new world record in the 60 Meter Dash

FLICKR

 

Next week, Marvel’s Black Panther is set to debut in theaters in Atlanta and all across the world.

It will feature a predominantly black cast in a genre that has traditionally had few black superheroes.

FLICKR

Today's Music Minute features the writer of a song that many consider to be the anthem of Atlanta…”Welcome to Atlanta!’

It’s just one of many hits created by writer and producer Jermaine Dupri, who is making history this week as only the second rap artist ever to be inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

In today's news:

  • General assembly tackles major issues, including adoption and opioids
  • GA Black Caucus honors 'Original 33' black legislators
  • Atlanta Dream sign 2-time WNBA champion

FLICKR

February is Black History Month here in the United States. Since 1976, every president has set aside the month to honor and remember African American history.

But is designating one month just for Black History appropriate? We tackle that question in the first part of our series about Black History Month.

We discuss this idea with Daniel Black. Black is an award-winning novelist and an African American Studies Professor at Clark Atlanta University. 

 

In today's news:

  • Lawmakers react to the State of the Union
  • Fort Stewart troops head to the Korean peninsula
  • South Fulton searches for new police chief

FLICKR

 

 

The 60th Annual Grammy awards will take place this Sunday.

 

Atlanta will be well represented, with a number of local artists nominated for awards in a variety of categories.

Freelance entertainment reporter Jewel Wicker joins GPB's Leah Fleming to preview this weekend's awards.

 

In today's news:

  • Atlanta sees record employment numbers from last year
  • Stacey Evans campaign removes ad filmed at Ebenezer Baptist church
  • Film featuring a Decatur woman who averted a school shooting debuts this weekend

In today's news:

  • Atlanta schools and government remain closed after another winter storm
  • Delays at HFJ Airport continue
  • Hypothermia claims multiple lives over the past weeks due to the cold

Today's headlines:

  • Winter weather heading to North Georgia and Metro Atlanta
  • David Perdue denies Trump's derogatory comments towards African countries
  • UGA's Roquan Smith declares for the NFL Draft

Today's news:

  • Governor Deal recaps his time in office in the State of the State of address
  • Falcons prepare for second round playoff matchup against Eagles
  • Gwinnett Commissioner Tommy Hunter threatens lawsuit after public reprimand

In today's headlines:

-Governor Deals says Georgia is a top competitor for Amazon's HQ2

-Gwinnett swears in it's first Latino mayor

-APD faces federal allegations of evidence tampering and excessive force

GPB: Taylor Gantt

 

Gwinnett County is fast becoming one of the most diverse areas in all of Georgia, and even throughout the southeast.

 

The county has been experiencing a cultural shift over the years.  

 

In fact, white residents no longer make up the majority of the county’s registered voters, and last year’s elections are proof of that.

 

In Norcross, councilman Craig Newton became Gwinnett’s first-ever black mayor.

 

 

-Governor Deal speaks at "Eggs and Issue" breakfast this morning

-Agnes Scott College announces new president

-South Fulton will not become "Renaissance" after mayor's veto

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