La'Raven Taylor

On Second Thought Producer

La'Raven was born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, so she’s no stranger to the south. La'Raven developed a passion for storytelling at a very young age. She became a features editor on her high school’s newspaper staff and an anchor on the school’s station. She graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi with a degree in journalism. She started working as an associate producer for WLBT in Jackson, MS. There, she worked her way up to become a senior producer. She also did some reporting. La'Raven is a member of NABJ and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. She loves reading, traveling and spending time with her family. She lives by the quote: “I think, therefore I am” by Descartes.

This week held playoffs for both the Braves and Atlanta United, but for the fans it is not only about wins and losses. On Second Thought delves into the psychology of Atlanta fandom with psychiatrist and researcher, Dr. Seth Norrholm.


Truth The Creator

Music festivals have become vehicles for building real world community and identity in an age when so much communication takes place online.

Afropunk music festival originated in Brooklyn as a fusion of the music and cultural heritage of the African diaspora and the raw “do it yourself” ethic of punk.


Afropunk is a well-known music festival produced by black artists. It is an international festival, but it will be in Atlanta this weekend. Afropunk goes beyond just entertainment. Its "Solution Sessions" are an effort to address and tackle ongoing issues in the black community. On Second Thought speaks to Ashleigh Shackelford, Bridget Todd and Yves Jeffcoat, three of the featured speakers to hear their messages.


Morehouse Film Festival/Be Funky Collage Maker

The Morehouse College Human Rights Film Festival aims to spark to conversation using "artivism" — the combination of art and activism. 

Filmmakers Korstiaan Vandiver and Devin “Egypt” Robinson spoke to On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about the impacts of art and activism in the film industry.  


Little Shop of Stories is bringing best-selling New York Times author Jason Reynolds to Decatur at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Parish on Thursday, Oct. 10 at 7 p.m.  Hear how Reynolds inspires young readers with contemporary stories that deal with real-world issues.


Sr. Helen Prejean is one of the most powerful advocates today for abolishing the death penalty. Her book, Dead Man Walking, has become a movie and an opera. Hear Sr. Helen’s story firsthand.


Premiering tonight, Retro Report on PBS questions the premise that the modern American political divide is a new one. The series explores the historical origins of issues and ideas that continue to replay in our headlines and culture today. On Second Thought got a preview of the series with the hosts, Masud Olafani and former OST host Celeste Headlee. 

Retro Report premieres tonight at 9 p.m. on Georgia Public Broadcasting Television. 


If music is a universal language, then OneBeat has diplomacy down. It’s a group of 25 emerging musicians from around the world who collaborate on writing, producing and performing original music. They also tour select cities. A few of the members, Farid Ghannam, a singer, Ming Qi, a synthesist, Rodney Barretto, a percussionist and Free Feral, a string player and composer, stopped by the studio to talk to On Second Thought.


AJ Mast / AP

Hispanic Heritage Month is a federally designated event that runs Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. It’s a time to celebrate how people with roots in Spanish-speaking countries add to the complex narrative of the American story.  

Hispanic food, fashion, architecture and art – as well as the Spanish language itself – have become essential elements in the American mix. Sometimes those contributions make a pop-culture splash. The song "Despacito" tied Billboard’s record for most weeks at the top spot after Justin Bieber remixed Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee’s reggaeton hit. Other contributions come  from teachers, doctors and families whose contributions grab less attention than athletes and movie stars.


Anotonio Johnson is a photographer and among the contributors for Pop-Up Zine Atlanta.  Johnson's project, You Next, aims to capture the sense of community and transformative power of the black barbershop across America.


An Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigative series has uncovered a chilling reality at some senior care facilities. Get the story from the AJC reporter, Carrie Teegardin.


Senator David Perdue has a new plan to create a clearinghouse of information to help schools enhance security, and Senator Isakson has a new bill that would fund research of mass violence at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Join the director of Georgia State University’s Center for School Safety, School Climate and Classroom Management, Kristen Varjas, and Executive Director of Safe Havens International, Michael Dorn, for a discussion of the plans and the issues that surround them.


“A Night of Georgia Music” continues a collaboration between Mike Mills, bassist songwriter and co-founder of R.E.M.; Chuck Leavell, former member of The Allman Brothers Band, now the music director and keyboardist for The Rolling Stones; and Robert McDuffie, violinist and founder of the Robert McDuffie Center for Strings at Mercer University.

They will be performing at the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra on Sept. 29, but first they stopped by On Second Thought.


John Boydson

Shantih Shantih is a four-piece band founded in Atlanta. The band combines rock 'n' roll with harmonies over twanging guitars — heard in their new single, Radio Dream. 

On Second Thought invited Anna Barattin and Julia Furgiuele from the band to add some tracks to our Georgia Playlist


Pixels.com/Ian Hooten

New and expecting mothers are frequently told that their lives will change once their baby arrives. They don't always hear how, especially when it comes to their careers.

Caitlyn Collins is a sociologist at Washington University in St. Louis. She conducted interviews with mothers around the world and found American moms feel far more stressed out than women in Italy, Germany and Sweden. Collins spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about her research.


Caitlyn Collins is a sociologist and author of "Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving."  Collins looks into “Work/Family Justice” for parents, especially as more and more women become the breadwinners of their families.  Her studies show that mothers in the United States are the most stressed of comparable western cultures and speak more about not having enough time to be with their children. Unlike many European countries, such as Sweden, the United States does not have a national support system for mothers. Collins preveiws her research into societal trends and policy with On Second Thought before her speech at the University of Georgia.


Michael Adno

Zora Neale Hurston's novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God, is a staple on high school and college reading lists. Published in 1937, it could have easily disappeared into obscurity if it wasn't for a young Georgia writer named Alice Walker


Suicides are on the rise in jails and prisons, and Georgia has one of the highest rates of inmate suicides in the nation — nearly double the national average. On Second Thought explores the circumstances effecting the numbers.

Atlanta-based freelance reporter Max Blau reported in The Macon Telegraph last month. He spoke to state officials, family members and dug into public records data. He joins On Second Thought to discuss his findings on prison suicides.


Vaping is under fire after a series of deaths and crackdowns on flavors, said to attract children to smoking. The new vaping flavors contain nicotine salts, which deliver nicotine more quickly through the body, increasing the likelihood of addiction. The effects of electronic cigarettes on school-age children have been reported as the cause of eight deaths so far.  On Second Thought speaks with Dean of GSU’s College of Public Health, Michael Eriksen, on the latest news and developments.


GSU Magazine/Ben Rollins

With a hint of fall in the air, India Jackson is still buzzing from a remarkable summer. On Second Thought spoke to the Georgia State University doctoral student and single mother just before she and her daughter left for NASA's prestigious summer internship program in Houston.

The stars aligned for Jackson when strangers from around the world stepped in to raise more than $8,000 through gofundme.com to support her dreams. Jackson is on the cover of the fall issue of GSU Magazine. She stopped back by On Second Thought with shocking details about her internship.


AP Images/Nam Y. Huh

Last week, the FDA disclosed a criminal probe into electronic cigarettes as the number of vaping-related illnesses climbed. The enforcement action dovetails with an ongoing Centers For Disease Control and Prevention investigation into vaping-related illness in the U.S. 

Five hundred thirty people with a history of vaping have been diagnosed with mysterious lung injuries. Eight people have died. Five of those cases are in Georgia, with another being investigated here.


The Youth Climate Strike will take place Friday in Georgia, other U.S. states and about 150 countries. High school and college students are skipping class to demand action on climate change, and they are timing the strike for right before Monday’s UN Climate Action Summit. On Second Thought hears from Andrea Manning and Zeena Abdulkarim, two of the Atlanta organizers and Dr. Kim Cobb, a climate science professor.


Ellen Eldridge / GPB

One year ago, today, On Second Thought was relaunched with a whole new staff.

To celebrate the anniversary, the whole team joined Virginia in the studio to share a guest or conversation that surprised or delighted them.


Today marks one year since On Second Thought relaunched in its current form. The whole team is on air today to share what has surprised and delighted us. Join On Second Thought for the celebration!


The first round of independent test results are due out this week for the Sterigenics plant in Smyrna, and the community’s Air Quality Oversight Committee is scheduled to meet Monday.  Get an update on the story from Georgia Health News’ Andy Miller, and Web MD Brenda Goodman. Plus, take a look at what’s happening on the political side of it from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution ’s Greg Bluestein.


Emory University is hosting a three-day, live reading of The Iliad, and On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott is among the orators. Delve into the classic tale with Stan Lombardo, a professor emeritus of classics at the University of Kansas, who wrote a modern translation of it.

East Point has an urban agriculture plan aimed at improving access to green spaces and minimizing food deserts. GPB’s Ross Terrell went to check it out.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019

Sep 11, 2019

Georgia State University students studying to be sports and entertainment lawyers have a new course available to them: The Legal Life of Ludacris.  GSU law professor Moraima "Mo" Ivory took On Second Thought back to school with a look at why the Georgia superstar’s career is a window into contract law.


AP Images/John Bazemore

This fall, Georgia State College of Law University is offering "The Legal Life of Ludacris" — a course examining the strategic legal decisions and contracts that supported his career as a rapper, actor, philanthropist and restaurateur. 

It's the brainchild of GSU entertainment law professor, Moraima "Mo" Ivory, who's the head of the school's "Entertainment, Sports and Media Law Initiative." Ivory spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about the now full class. 


Emory University

A team of specialists at Emory University will never forget Aug. 2, 2014. That's the day Kent Brantley, an American missionary based in Liberia, became the first of four patients with the Ebola virus to arrive at its Atlanta facility. 

The eyes of the world watched as the Serious Communicable Diseases Unit ⁠— in hazmat suits, successfully treated Brantley and three other patients with the highly infectious disease.


It’s been five years as of this summer since the first U.S. Ebola patient went to Emory University Hospital. On Second Thought looks back on the events that followed with Dr. Colleen Kraft, one of the physicians who helped with care.


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