Jesse Nighswonger

Jesse Nighswonger works with On Second Thought and Political Rewind as an engineer and audio editor. 

 

He has a degree in audio production from The Art Institute of Atlanta and a background in freelance sound design and composing. He's worked with clients such as the Atlanta Falcons, Adobe, and Bounce TV. Outside of work, Jesse enjoys making music, biking, and watching beautiful, sad movies.

Courtesy of Will Brown / Kate DeCiccio for Amplifier / Courtesy of Donal Thornton and Tresor Dieudonné

As 2019 drew to a close, protests spilled into cities from Hong Kong to Santiago, Paris to Tehran, and Khartoum to La Paz. People around the world flocked to the streets, often with handmade signs, addressing their objections to policy changes, power grabs and cutbacks.

The power of images to communicate disagreement is the subject of an exhibition now on view at the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA). 


Talent Room Entertainment

Glenn Jones got his start in the music industry at a young age, signing to gospel label Savoy Records at just 17 years old. Later, his single “Here I Go Again” reached the top of the R&B charts in 1991.

Now, Jones is based in Atlanta and releasing new music under his independent label, Talent Room Entertainment.

On Second Thought invited Glenn Jones into the studio to share his additions to the Georgia Playlist.


Greg Gibson / AP Photo

On Tuesday, July 30, 1996, Richard Jewell was praised as a hero by Katie Couric on NBC’S TODAY show. The security guard hired for the summer Olympics spoke about spotting a suspicious knapsack amidst some 50,000 revelers in Centennial Olympic Park. Two people died and 111 were injured when a bomb inside the bag exploded.  Jewell’s vigilance and the evacuation that followed likely save hundreds of lives. 

 

Less than 12 hours after chatting with Couric, Jewell was being questioned by the FBI as the primary suspect in the bombing.

 

 


 

 

John Harrell / AP

Clint Eastwood’s film Richard Jewell is out and, as a piece that is critical of journalists, it generated discussion before the first ticket was even sold. 

Like Eastwood’s film, Mistaken: The Real Story of Richard Jewell follows Jewell’s descent from hero to villain in the court of public opinion. And, while Mistaken diverges from Eastwood’s film in a number of ways, it is also an invitation to think critically about the role of journalism and how we, the public, consume it.

 

 

 

 

Patrick Semansky / AP Images

The impeachment inquiry has moved into the hands of the House Judiciary Committee. The first round of proceedings concluded with questioning the reliability of testimonies brought up in the hearing.

The headlining topics were the use of Hearsay and the U.S. State Department.

We invited lawyer and Pro Hac Judge to the city of Atlanta Municipal Court, Parag Shah to better explain hearsay and its use of admission in court.

  

BILL BOLLING / ATLANTA COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

Bill Bolling knew from his first experience at the community kitchen at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta that he was destined for a life of service.

"I thought wow, this is it. After three college degrees and being a veteran — I even called my mother up and said, 'Mom! This is what God wants me to do,'" Bolling said. "Make soup!"

We spoke with Bill Bolling about founding the Atlanta Community Food Bank in 1979. The food bank has served over 750,000 people each year in Georgia. Bolling retired in 2015, but still actively works with food organizations like the Foodwell Alliance. He is also involved in collaborative efforts to combat poverty and housing inequality in the state.

 

Abrams Press

On Tuesday, July 30, 1996, Richard Jewell was praised as a hero on NBC’s Today Show. The security guard hired for the Summer Olympics in Atlanta spotted a suspicious knapsack at Centennial Olympic Park, where tens of thousands of visitors gathered.

Two people died and 111 were injured when the bomb inside the knapsack exploded. Jewell’s vigilance and the evacuation that followed likely saved hundreds of lives. But less than 12 hours after chatting with Katie Couric, Jewell was being questioned by the FBI as the primary suspect in that bombing.


Skiff Mountain Films

There are more than two million people incarcerated in the United States. Over two-thirds of them lack a high school diploma, and less than 13% have attended college.

But where nearly half of all formerly incarcerated people return to prison within three years, the students working towards associates and bachelor’s degrees through the Bard Prison Initiative, or BPI, have a recidivism rate of just 4%.


Emily Frobos

Sub Pop Records in Seattle has churned out a number of hit-makers. There's The Shins, Sonic Youth, Sound Garden and more. (Who could forget Nirvana?)

And the record label keeps the acts coming. One of the newest additions to their roster: Atlanta locals, Omni.


Courtesy of the High Museum of Art

"There is no exquisite beauty...without some strangeness in the proportion."

That's a line from Edgar Allan Poe, the king of the dark and eerie, the strange and surreal. It could also describe the appeal of an exhibition currently on view at the High Museum of Art, called "Strange Light: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin."


Rachael Joyce

Revisionist History podcast host Malcolm Gladwell's books have opened up new ways to consider human behavior — introducing concepts like "stickiness," the "10,000 hour rule" and The Tipping Point

His newest New York Times best-seller asks why we are so bad at understanding people we don't know. It's called Talking To Strangers. 


There are some stories that bear repeating over and over. One of those stories is Harriet Tubman’s. A new movie about the heroic abolitionist, known as the “Moses of her people”, is coming out Nov. 1.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Kurds are evacuating their traditional homeland in Northeast Syria during a five-day brokered pause in hostility. This pause in military action is set to end today, Oct. 22.

The situation is complicated, violent and unfolding on the other side of the world, but Americans are following the events closely.


Rachael Joyce

The Rachel Maddow Show is the biggest draw on MSNBC’s primetime line-up. The show tilts against Fox News’ Sean Hannity in the high stakes battle for cable news viewers. Both hosts have large and obsessive audiences, and both have seen double digit jumps in ratings since congress launched an impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.

That story was roiling when Rachel Maddow made her way onto the stage, at an event sponsored by A Cappella Books last Sunday, Oct. 13. On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott interviewed Maddow at the Fox Theatre. Today’s episode is part of the interview from Sunday.


Morehouse Film Festival/Be Funky Collage Maker

The Morehouse College Human Rights Film Festival aims to spark to conversation using "artivism" — the combination of art and activism. 

Filmmakers Korstiaan Vandiver and Devin “Egypt” Robinson spoke to On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about the impacts of art and activism in the film industry.  


Sara Hanna

Chef Pano Karatassos has emerged victorious. He valiantly represented Georgia on the Food Network show Beat Bobby Flay, clenching the win with his signature lamb pie.

JAE C. HONG / ASSOCIATED PRESS

"The Beverly Hillbillies" introduced audiences to the Clampett family in the 1960s and helped popularize the stereotype of the "Dumb Southerner." The myth persists today, wrapped up with ideas about tolerance, race and intelligence.

Marie T. Cochran, director of the Affrilachia Artist Project, joined On Second Thought to dig into this idea and her experiences growing up in Appalachia. Chuck Reece, host of The Bitter Southerner Podcast, also joined the conversation.


Alexia Webster

While headlines fill with international tensions, a group of artists from around the world aim to garner some cultural diplomacy through the power of music.

OneBeat brings 25 emerging musicians together to collaborate on writing, producing and performing original music, in the hopes of using the universal language of music to encourage cultural exchange.


GPB

Boudleaux and Felice Bryant had a deep impact in Nashville, with notable hits like "Bye Bye Love" and “All I Have to Do Is Dream.” Their music has been recorded by artists like The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton and Simon & Garfunkel.

The hit-making couple is the subject of a new exhibit at The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville, Tenn.


Erika Davidson / AP

The world mourns a Georgia-born music giant today. Jessye Norman, the renowned opera star, passed on Sept. 30, 2019 at the age of 74.

Norman was born in Augusta in 1945 and grew up in the segregated South. In her memoir, Stand Up Straight and Sing!, she remembers listening to opera on the radio as a child.


Ben Mathewson

Grammy-winning jazz saxophonist David Sánchez hails from Puerto Rico, but, these days, he calls Atlanta home. Schooled in jazz by the legends, Sánchez is now schooling others as an artist-in-residence at Georgia State University. Tune in for a sample of his new record, Carib a project about exploring the music of the African Diaspora, beginning in the Caribbean.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Two legendary rock musicians and an innovative classical violinist join On Second Thought to talk about how they are mashing up their respective disciplines. Along with original compositions, these musicians use songs from Georgia’s most beloved musicians and bands and adapt them for an orchestra.


MAX RITTER

Kishi Bashi made a name for himself with the shiny, fantastical indie pop of his first three albums. (The singer and multi-instrumentalist also made a pseudonym for himself: his stage name is a mashup of his first initial – K, for Kaoru – and last name, Ishibashi.) 

Ishibashi's newest record Omoiyari takes a more sober turn. From Japanese, "omoiyari" roughly translates as compassion or kindness shown toward others, which stirred in the Athens-based musician after President Trump's administration placed a travel ban on people from specific, predominantly Muslim countries.


Mandy Wilson

In honor of the Ken Burns series Country Music, Bill Nigut is taking over the On Second Thought Sunday time slot with a special edition of Two Way Street. This episode features his conversation with the legendary Brenda Lee, an artist featured in sections of the documentary. 


wikimedia.org

Before Outkast, Goodie Mobb and T.I. burst out of Georgia, there was Blind Willie McTell and James Brown.  Before Trisha Yearwood, Alan Jackson and Jason Aldean stepped onto the country music scene, Brenda Lee and Chet Atkins were changing the sound of country music altogether.

What unifies those musical giants? Georgia. On Second Thought embarked on an audio tour of the dense and diverse musical roots of Georgia, from Ma Rainey and the Skillet Lickers to Emmett Miller and Otis Redding.


Courtesy of HarperCollins Publishers

Laurel Snyder has made a career of picture books and middle-grade novels that don't shy away from the facts of life. Her newest novel, My Jasper June, follows Jasper and Leah as they embark on a summer of urban adventures and navigate the messy path between childhood fantasy and grown-up realities.


University of Georgia Press

While the origin stories of the barbecue capital of world may vary, Jim Auchmutey has found one thing we can agree on: Barbecue has a Southern accent. 


Neka King and Sarah Emerson

29Rooms has been called a fun house for adults and an Instagram paradise. This immersive art festival has popped up in L.A. and New York, this month 29Rooms is stopping in Atlanta on a five-city tour.

The interactive experience created by the Refinery29 website is as advertised — a collection of 29 distinct rooms with work from artists all over the country. Like the Museum of Ice Cream and Museum of Pizza posted on Instagram, it will be a selfie paradise.


GPB News

Now we add some more songs to our essential Georgia playlist from Avery Gipson. We ask artists to pick two songs written or performed by another Georgian that best represent the state.

At 18 years old, Avery Gipson is already an award-winning singer-songwriter. Her first single, “Look What You’ve Done,” came out earlier this year.


Adult Swim

"Squidbillies" is Atlanta-based Adult Swim’s third longest-running animated series. It’s based on the show creators’ experiences here in Georgia – and features a cast of anthropomorphic redneck squids. The 12th season of "Squidbillies" premieres Sunday on Adult Swim. Hear from the co-creators Dave Willis and Jim Fortier who recently joined us on On Second Thought


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